Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now

Deprotonation and Ligand exchange question.

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I have a question from my "Inorganic Complexes" workbook.

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide solution is added to a solution of iron (II) chloride. A dirty-green precipitate appears which is insoluble in excess sodium hydroxide. Write an equation to show the reaction taking place, and state the type of reaction taking place.

    Yeah, I don't really know if I am overthinking this because it's a topic I'm new with, but I am not sure whether to write the iron (ii) chloride as a complex ion, and I don't know what type of reaction it would be. I know it could be acid-base (deprotonation) or ligand exchange. I'm also pretty sure that the precipitate is Fe(H2O)4(OH)2

    Help/explanation is greatly appreciated, as I'm feeling slightly out of my depth here.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jamesthelam)
    I have a question from my "Inorganic Complexes" workbook.

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide solution is added to a solution of iron (II) chloride. A dirty-green precipitate appears which is insoluble in excess sodium hydroxide. Write an equation to show the reaction taking place, and state the type of reaction taking place.

    Yeah, I don't really know if I am overthinking this because it's a topic I'm new with, but I am not sure whether to write the iron (ii) chloride as a complex ion, and I don't know what type of reaction it would be. I know it could be acid-base (deprotonation) or ligand exchange. I'm also pretty sure that the precipitate is Fe(H2O)4(OH)2

    Help/explanation is greatly appreciated, as I'm feeling slightly out of my depth here.
    Yes, proton abstraction from the iron(II) hexaaqua complex ion.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charco)
    Yes, proton abstraction from the iron(II) hexaaqua complex ion.
    Thanks. Would I write the FeCl2 in a different way because it's in solution, and is a complex? Or is it simply written as [Fe(H2O)6]3- and the chlorine not considered?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jamesthelam)
    Thanks. Would I write the FeCl2 in a different way because it's in solution, and is a complex? Or is it simply written as [Fe(H2O)6]3- and the chlorine not considered?
    In solution iron exists as the hexaaqua ion ... the chlorides are balancing ions.
 
 
 
Poll
Which party will you be voting for in the General Election 2017?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.