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Deprotonation and Ligand exchange question. Watch

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    I have a question from my "Inorganic Complexes" workbook.

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide solution is added to a solution of iron (II) chloride. A dirty-green precipitate appears which is insoluble in excess sodium hydroxide. Write an equation to show the reaction taking place, and state the type of reaction taking place.

    Yeah, I don't really know if I am overthinking this because it's a topic I'm new with, but I am not sure whether to write the iron (ii) chloride as a complex ion, and I don't know what type of reaction it would be. I know it could be acid-base (deprotonation) or ligand exchange. I'm also pretty sure that the precipitate is Fe(H2O)4(OH)2

    Help/explanation is greatly appreciated, as I'm feeling slightly out of my depth here.
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    (Original post by jamesthelam)
    I have a question from my "Inorganic Complexes" workbook.

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide solution is added to a solution of iron (II) chloride. A dirty-green precipitate appears which is insoluble in excess sodium hydroxide. Write an equation to show the reaction taking place, and state the type of reaction taking place.

    Yeah, I don't really know if I am overthinking this because it's a topic I'm new with, but I am not sure whether to write the iron (ii) chloride as a complex ion, and I don't know what type of reaction it would be. I know it could be acid-base (deprotonation) or ligand exchange. I'm also pretty sure that the precipitate is Fe(H2O)4(OH)2

    Help/explanation is greatly appreciated, as I'm feeling slightly out of my depth here.
    Yes, proton abstraction from the iron(II) hexaaqua complex ion.
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    (Original post by charco)
    Yes, proton abstraction from the iron(II) hexaaqua complex ion.
    Thanks. Would I write the FeCl2 in a different way because it's in solution, and is a complex? Or is it simply written as [Fe(H2O)6]3- and the chlorine not considered?
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    (Original post by jamesthelam)
    Thanks. Would I write the FeCl2 in a different way because it's in solution, and is a complex? Or is it simply written as [Fe(H2O)6]3- and the chlorine not considered?
    In solution iron exists as the hexaaqua ion ... the chlorides are balancing ions.
 
 
 
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