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    (Original post by Foobso)
    That's good that you're not bothered about earnings then. I wonder if the people that do these 'micky mouse degrees' will feel that way in twenty years time. My point really, was that so many people are being pressured into uni now, that many people are just opting for these easy degrees. I'm sure that's not the case for everyone, but for the others, is it really worth it?
    That is true, I do feel that people are pressurised into uni nowadays, but instead of choosing a subject because it is 'easy' it might be that they choose these 'mickey mouse' degrees because they enjoy the subject.
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    That's good that you're not bothered about earnings then. I wonder if the people that do these 'micky mouse degrees' will feel that way in twenty years time. My point really, was that so many people are being pressured into uni now, that many people are just opting for these easy degrees. I'm sure that's not the case for everyone, but for the others, is it really worth it?
    Nope, it's not.
    Nobody should feel pressurised into it.
    See what you mean there.
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    (Original post by lea164)
    But how can you compare ANY subject? They are all different. The point is that its all at degree level, so anyone studying at degree knows their own individual subject to the same level.
    Then why are entry requirements lower for these 'easy' degrees. Yeah, a subject could be at 'degree' level, but that is hardly a justification for its existence. Just because its 'a degree' does not make it the same level of difficulty or as useful as other subjects.
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    I've always thought a 'mickey mouse' degree to be these new less traditional courses especially at universities that aren't well respected. I suppose it just depends on what you want to do in life, those more traditional subjects such as English give you more scope to do a range of jobs.

    I'm not really sure what I want to do after I get my degree which is why I'm doing a Business (BA) at Durham (aslong as I get the grades). A lot of people seem to turn their noses up at Business degrees though, do you think it would be respected by employers and not a 'mickey mouse' degree of sorts?
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    An Econminist would say a business degree is now a good degree becuase thats the way the UK is heading...we deal in money now not product...so business is a very useful degree...

    but you would only take it if you were to go a big business for 3-5years and then leave it to start your own...if not you would be better off doing a maths/english/science/humanities degree...
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    To be honest - I've never studies film studies, and I'm sure I'd find it interesting; I even once considered studying it as a minor with English Lit. - but I can't see it comparing academically to subjects like medecine, History, or anything seen as traditional. You may think that I am being obstinate or whatever, but you're free to tell me what you study in film studies that's so damn hard and I'll happily re-evaluate my opinion.
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    Well nothing in ANY circumstance is 'certain', but you seem to be clutching at straws here. For a degree such as medicine, law, maths etc, your prospects of employment are very good, but for degrees such as 'surf studies', or 'golf course management' the employment and earning potential are undeniably lower, at least for the majority. When did it become that there has to be a degree for everything? It just seems pointless.
    I'm not clutching at straws at all. I'm just pointing out that after uni if nobody is guaranteed a job then who are we to judge everyone else's degrees?
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    (Original post by nanananabatman)
    I'm not clutching at straws at all. I'm just pointing out that after uni if nobody is guaranteed a job then who are we to judge everyone else's degrees?
    I don't think anyone should 'judge' anyone elses degrees and I'm sorry if I implied that, but it's true that some subjects are looked upon more highly than others, and employment prospects ARE higher. If you're doing a degree you really enjoy and think worthwhile (whatever the subject), then that's all that matters, but I think these 'micky mouse degrees' are widely taken by people who see it as a way to get an 'easy' degree, and nothing more, which is a shame. If you have no passion for the subject, just don't do it.
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    (Original post by lilac spooge)
    Firstly economics and maths are different subjects...I have a friend who is expected to get a A at Alevel in maths but is going on to take economics...

    Economics is a degree for human geographers who like a bit more of a mathmatical challenge...

    and for the psycholgy argument...its a waste of time...theres to many people taking it for you to get a job and employers dont take it seriously enough as a degree if you want to try another type of undergrad job...

    and the only way to get a job from it is to go into medicine first...yes that means 9years of university....have fun...
    Economics is much more than human geography with maths. It's one of the more respected degree disciplines out there (pretty much an "elite" vocational degree like medicine and law). Economists go on to work in finance, just like many mathematicians and science graduates, in many ways they are better suited to the role because they specialise on economic modelling which isn't covered in a mathematics degree (since they're concentrating on so many other things). I have a friend doing maths who'd probably be much better off having done economics given that he wants to go into financial employment.

    Secondly, I must disagree about psychology too. I concede that as a stand-alone degree it has relatively little value to graduate employers, however, when combined with postgraduate study and professional qualifications, it is the major route into psychotherapeutic professions. A relative of mine went through this path and is paid around £100 per hour and one of his senior colleagues was self-taught and is probably earning more. Most top universities offering medicine probably wouldn't consider someone for medicine as a path to psychology. Medics are simply too expensive to train (£250,000 per medic through university or some such) for them to go on to do anything but become doctors. Most places are extremely selective when it comes to selecting candidates for medicine and the remainder of places don't produce the same calibre of doctors.
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    I should really avoid reading threads like this, they wind me up so much, especially as I wade through reading for my dissertation.

    Since my course is so easy, I might as well just not bother since I am clearly guaranteed to pass and then will end up unemployed anyway.
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    (Original post by strawberry_wise)
    I should really avoid reading threads like this, they wind me up so much, especially as I wade through reading for my dissertation.

    Since my course is so easy, I might as well just not bother since I am clearly guaranteed to pass and then will end up unemployed anyway.
    I'm glad you've finally realised your fate.
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    I'm glad you've finally realised your fate.
    It's alright. I've always fancied the UB40 lifestyle. Drinking bitter in pubs at ten in the morning. Raising a herd of uncouth children. Hassling the well-to-do general public for a "ciggie".

    Plus you get concession rate at the cinema. Bonus!
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    These threads are so tedious. Everyone here is completely obsessed with career prospects...not everyone goes to University to earn a ticket to an instant job on graduation - there's also the general desire for education or the general university experience, staying on to postgraduate level etc. Besides, the only degrees that are really tunnels into a direct careers are law, medicine and maybe computer sciences...very few science based students that I have met know what they want to do when they graduate and few will go into a career related to their degree.

    I think science based subjects have bigger workloads than humanities but are not objectively 'harder' than other degrees since the difficulty of any given course is down to both your personal abilities, your previous education and the amount of hours/effort you put in. Furthermore there is not objectively more academic value to the sciences than to humanities. Psychology, Sociology, Media Studies etc are all valid academic pursuits and are arguably more useful than science based subjects for the workplace. (I'm not talking about fringe speciailist subjects that are more vocational like the 'Surf Studies' so beloved of TSR.)
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    Then why are entry requirements lower for these 'easy' degrees. Yeah, a subject could be at 'degree' level, but that is hardly a justification for its existence. Just because its 'a degree' does not make it the same level of difficulty or as useful as other subjects.
    The entry requirements are often lower because they are less popular and because applicants are of lower ability, not because the subject is necessarily easier.
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    Furthermore there is not objectively more academic value to the sciences than to humanities. Psychology, Sociology, Media Studies etc are all valid academic pursuits and are arguably more useful than science based subjects for the workplace. (I'm not talking about fringe speciailist subjects that are more vocational like the 'Surf Studies' so beloved of TSR.)
    No-one said that there was more value to a science subject than a humanity (in fact, I study a humanity), but some are more traditional than other; history, politics and english are all examples. It is in NO way correct to say that media studies is more useful for the workplace. I've been to many marketing and PR placements over summers and easters where I've never even been asked about my degree....the only thing difficult about getting one of these jobs is the sheeer numbers of graduate with random degrees. If you think your BA Media Studies will help you, then you're in for a shock....
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    One cannot objectively, realistically or successfully compare the different degree subjects because one can only really know about one's own subject.

    This aside, It's not the degree subject that will get you a job, it's how you sell it to potential employers- and it's you and your value to them as a worker that'll count when it comes down to it.

    Or one can run one's own business, as I'm going to do myself.
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    (Original post by ssk2)
    No-one said that there was more value to a science subject than a humanity (in fact, I study a humanity), but some are more traditional than other; history, politics and english are all examples. It is in NO way correct to say that media studies is more useful for the workplace. I've been to many marketing and PR placements over summers and easters where I've never even been asked about my degree....the only thing difficult about getting one of these jobs is the sheeer numbers of graduate with random degrees. If you think your BA Media Studies will help you, then you're in for a shock....
    Well employers suffer from the same elitism that is being offered here...if there is a heirachy of respected degree courses then that is going to affect the employers outlook as to what degrees are more valuable. But in reality the skills acquired through a Media Studies or social science degree will better equip someone for a wide variety of fields than the knowledge aquired through a science based degree in my opinion. Science degrees in my experience are more intensely knowledge based rather than based on skills like critical thinking or analytical skills which are technically more appplicable to day to day life.
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    (Original post by Laika)
    Well employers suffer from the same elitism that is being offered here...if there is a heirachy of respected degree courses then that is going to affect the employers outlook as to what degrees are more valuable. But in reality the skills acquired through a Media Studies or social science degree will better equip someone for a wide variety of fields than the knowledge aquired through a science based degree in my opinion. Science degrees in my experience are more intensely knowledge based rather than based on skills like critical thinking or analytical skills which are technically more appplicable to day to day life.
    That's where employers use GCSE and A-level grades, to see if you're a good all-round achiever. Having 11 As at GCSE shows you have a good grip on all aspects of education, from maths to biology to english to art to business studies (for example). Likewise, at A-level. That's why it's beneficial to take a variety of A-level types, social AND science subjects.

    Having a media studies or science degree doesn't automatically make you more/less suited to a 'general' job (probably it'll end up being 'admin'). It all depends on the individual person and their skills- you are not defined by your degree subject. The truth is, humanities graduates rarely have any other choice than to consider 'a wide variety of fields'; they are not qualified to do anything in particular. Here I'm not referring to Economics, which I consider to be more of a science, i.e. Econometrics. This is where a science degree is more beneficial employment-wise than a humanity subject- you have the BSc, the qualification required to walk straight in to a lab job, and then work your way up. But, of course, science graduates have that opportunity or the same 'general' opportunities as humanities graduates.

    By the way Laika, you would have to be deluded to think that science degrees do not provide an analytical background. In fact they provide one that is highly analytical. Science undergraduates use their knowledge and research skills to think their way round complex real-life problems. I'll bet almost all (there are always exceptions- it depends on the person) could downsize their abilities to address the more meagre and mundane issues raised in a 9-5.
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    Well, I don't particularly care whether a degree is arts/sciences etc, i dont think that has much relation to whether its MM or not, however, people who have time to go out every other night at uni and have less than about 10 hours of lectures a week (come on, thats less than you had at two days of SCHOOL a week) are definitely more generally speaking in the MM category of degree. Many of them don't admit it till years later when they are in a dead end job and resigned. I know a guy with Film Studies from York uni still working in Sainsbury's shelf stacking on nightshift while he chases his 'dream job' at the BBC...after 10 interviews and rejections, hes still waiting. Also know a guy with theology from Durham who is a waiter for minimum wage...
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    Is Marketing a mickey mouse degree?
 
 
 
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