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    (Original post by Schokis)
    That's where employers use GCSE and A-level grades, to see if you're a good all-round achiever. Having 11 As at GCSE shows you have a good grip on all aspects of education, from maths to biology to english to art to business studies (for example). Likewise, at A-level. That's why it's beneficial to take a variety of A-level types, social AND science subjects.
    Yes that is one yardstick by which to measure someone's general capability but it does not discredit the value of a humanity/social science degree which goes far beyond the depth of a fairly simplistic GCSE or A Level qualification. I'm not attacking Science degrees by any means, I have already stated they have a far greater general workload I just simply do not think as a general rule that they better equip you for the workplace than other degrees. For example, humanities like History and English are more highly regarded by most than the social sciences when in fact they are on the same level of depth and difficulty in my opinion - attitudes are simply skewed by lack of understanding and general ignorance. Personally the science students that I have met (two of which I have lived with for the past two years) would be intellectually incapable of studying these subjects. It simply takes different skills.

    Having a media studies or science degree doesn't automatically make you more/less suited to a 'general' job (probably it'll end up being 'admin'). It all depends on the individual person and their skills- you are not defined by your degree subject. The truth is, humanities graduates rarely have any other choice than to consider 'a wide variety of fields'; they are not qualified to do anything in particular. Here I'm not referring to Economics, which I consider to be more of a science, i.e. Econometrics. This is where a science degree is more beneficial employment-wise than a humanity subject- you have the BSc, the qualification required to walk straight in to a lab job, and then work your way up. But, of course, science graduates have that opportunity or the same 'general' opportunities as humanities graduates.
    I agree to an extent. A science based degree, particularly if you pursue postgraduate research is very useful for carving out a career path. However, I think that relatively few science graduates do go into employment directly related to their field or postgraduate work. Furthermore, there are several direct potential paths for humanities students to pursue, particularly teaching if they had their career choice firmly in mind. I simply think it's a generalisation to discredit those degrees on that point. Also, as I already pointed out, not everyone takes a degree puely for the employment oppurtunities, some do it for love of their subject or for the university experience in itself.

    By the way Laika, you would have to be deluded to think that science degrees do not provide an analytical background. In fact they provide one that is highly analytical. Science undergraduates use their knowledge and research skills to think their way round complex real-life problems. I'll bet almost all (there are always exceptions- it depends on the person) could downsize their abilities to address the more meagre and mundane issues raised in a 9-5.
    Granted I don't take a science degree. I am not saying their is no analysis involved, which would obviously be stupid, but many humanities subjects are based fundamentally around critical analysis whereas in general science subjects lean towards knowledge acquisition.
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    would journalism at undergrad level be considered a mickey mouse subject then?
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    (Original post by choco6)
    would journalism at undergrad level be considered a mickey mouse subject then?
    You'd be much, much better off doing English.
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    What about Marketing???
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    Some people would consider Sociology and Psychology to be "mickey mouse". But I want to teach either or both of these two at a further education institution. And I know that having a degree in either of them would bloody help me get there. So, I don't really care what people think, lol. Because it's not like I haven't got a career in mind.
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    Why are media and film studies considered 'less worthy' than the likes of English (and by English I presume you mean Literature and Language)? In each subject you are doing almost exactly the same thing - analysing a text in terms of its context and language/layout etc... and applying different theories to help you do this.

    The only difference is the medium - films/magazines/adverts/tv programmes or novels/short stories/poems!

    I only hope that the reason for this prejudice is because of the fact that media and film studies are reletively new subjects compared to English which has been taught for many years.
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    not to be rude but I don';t media will ever be seen as good as English....
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    lol.. at every1s comments!
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    This article caught my eye.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6955701.stm

    "If 'non-courses' were abolished, all the other students could save over £100 on their tuition fees or buy an extra pint of beer a week."

    :eek2:
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    (Original post by SuperDaz)
    "If 'non-courses' were abolished, all the other students could save over £100 on their tuition fees or buy an extra pint of beer a week."
    Ah, appealing to the average student's fondness for alcoholic beverages, very cunning. :p:
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    Would a combined hons in English Lit and Philosophy be considered a mickey mouse degree?
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    Ah... apparently with my 'mikey mouse degree' I should be unemployed right now, because it's useless and won't help me get a job.. *looks around her* nope, i'm definetely still working at the BBC *checks the date*, yup it's definetely been just over two years to the day that I graduated and started working the day after.
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    (Original post by Laus)
    Would a combined hons in English Lit and Philosophy be considered a mickey mouse degree?
    I wouldn't say so, I took additional philosophy in my A2 year and it was very challenging. English lit is also very well respected.

    Obviously, if you do media you can't get a job at the National Physics labs, but equally with a maths degree you can't really go and do film production, someone who did that degree would be much more suited.

    My brother did what some of you may consider a Mickey Mouse degree, Interactive Media Design, however he got a first and is now doing a Phd. In that Phd he is working on creating voice simulators for those with general but no fine motor control. At present only a very small amount of feeling can be conveyed with current ones, think about how many ways you say the word 'yes'. How much meaning can be conveyed with a single word, now imagine how frustrating it would be to only be able to use a voice simulator to say it two ways. The parents of the kids he's been working with have said how grateful they are that they're finally being able understand exactly what they're child means, without the child getting frustrated or having to be asked lots of questions.

    I'm sure many people would dismiss that degree out of hand, but if any of you know someone who would be benefitted by the research then it could be wonderful for you all in the future.

    I myself study law, but it was a toss up between law or fashion design. Fashion is tough, you all wear clothes, someone has to design them.
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    Qualifications that are only useful for a very few jobs, that there are far too many already qualified to do those jobs in and for which the jobs are either not important, or not in demand.

    For example, sociology, psychology, film studies, media studies, English Literature etc.

    If I was in government, I would give heavily subsidised university fees for degrees in demand (sciences, engineering) to remedy this.

    There is absolutely no point in making everyone pay to go to univiserty only to end up in loads of debt with little hope of a job at the end of it on mickey mouse courses.
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    (Original post by Accident-&Emergency)
    I wouldn't say so, I took additional philosophy in my A2 year and it was very challenging. English lit is also very well respected.

    Obviously, if you do media you can't get a job at the National Physics labs, but equally with a maths degree you can't really go and do film production, someone who did that degree would be much more suited.

    My brother did what some of you may consider a Mickey Mouse degree, Interactive Media Design, however he got a first and is now doing a Phd. In that Phd he is working on creating voice simulators for those with general but no fine motor control. At present only a very small amount of feeling can be conveyed with current ones, think about how many ways you say the word 'yes'. How much meaning can be conveyed with a single word, now imagine how frustrating it would be to only be able to use a voice simulator to say it two ways. The parents of the kids he's been working with have said how grateful they are that they're finally being able understand exactly what they're child means, without the child getting frustrated or having to be asked lots of questions.

    I'm sure many people would dismiss that degree out of hand, but if any of you know someone who would be benefitted by the research then it could be wonderful for you all in the future.

    I myself study law, but it was a toss up between law or fashion design. Fashion is tough, you all wear clothes, someone has to design them.
    Thanks for you response. I also took Philosophy and English Literature at A2 level so at least I'll have some background knowledge for both subjects.

    I'm also interested in Law so I might go on to take a GDL at postgraduate level. Do you think English Literature and Philosophy would be good preparatory subjects for a career in Law?

    I think it's absolutely amazing what your brother has achieved. What a fantastic thing to be doing. I'd love to do something that makes a real difference to someone's life. To think of the difference that those simulators will make to that child's life.

    Research is paramount and it shouldn't be dismissed.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Qualifications that are only useful for a very few jobs, that there are far too many already qualified to do those jobs in and for which the jobs are either not important, or not in demand.

    For example, sociology, psychology, film studies, media studies, English Literature etc.

    If I was in government, I would give heavily subsidised university fees for degrees in demand (sciences, engineering) to remedy this.

    There is absolutely no point in making everyone pay to go to univiserty only to end up in loads of debt with little hope of a job at the end of it on mickey mouse courses.
    I thought English Literature was a well respected degree amongst employers?
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)

    There is absolutely no point in making everyone pay to go to univiserty only to end up in loads of debt with little hope of a job at the end of it on mickey mouse courses.

    It's up to people what degree they choose to pay for though.

    That point you made about subsidising 'academic' degrees. As much as I hate that idea, as it encourages academic snobbery, and I don't think it's fair that some people should have to pay more for their education just because they want to learn different things; I've got to admit that I'd still pay the extra money to do my 'Mickey Mouse' course, so I can't say that it wouldn't work as an idea...
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    (Original post by schmeeble)
    Ah... apparently with my 'mikey mouse degree' I should be unemployed right now, because it's useless and won't help me get a job.. *looks around her* nope, i'm definetely still working at the BBC *checks the date*, yup it's definetely been just over two years to the day that I graduated and started working the day after.
    Good on you. I used to dream of working as a researcher for the BBC...
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    *Resists the urge to rant

    But seriously, these degrees only exist for statistical reasons, the UK government needed to increase the percentage of degree graduates among school leavers so that it diddn't look quite so inferior in the eyes of Europe and China.
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    (Original post by Laus)
    Thanks for you response. I also took Philosophy and English Literature at A2 level so at least I'll have some background knowledge for both subjects.

    I'm also interested in Law so I might go on to take a GDL at postgraduate level. Do you think English Literature and Philosophy would be good preparatory subjects for a career in Law?

    I think it's absolutely amazing what your brother has achieved. What a fantastic thing to be doing. I'd love to do something that makes a real difference to someone's life. To think of the difference that those simulators will make to that child's life.

    Research is paramount and it shouldn't be dismissed.
    Yeah, English and philosophy will put you in good stead for law. They show you have research skills, can think things through both logically and in a more abstract fashion, and Lit shows creativity, which is always a good thing!

    Thanks for saying that, what he's doing is incredible! He's only 23, the cleverclogs.
 
 
 
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