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what exactly is a 'mickey mouse' degree? watch

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    (Original post by ChrisRH)
    *Resists the urge to rant

    But seriously, these degrees only exist for statistical reasons, the UK government needed to increase the percentage of degree graduates among school leavers so that it diddn't look quite so inferior in the eyes of Europe and China.

    They don't only exist for statistical reasons; they exist to give people the education they want/need.
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    Not at all true, had they not needed to appear to have more 'degree' graduates you'd be studying at a polytechnic for an HND right now.
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    I wouldn't :p: I'd probably have gone to another country to get my degree because that's what I'd need to do.
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    Thanks A&E. Good luck with Law I hope it gets you where you want to be. Do you think a GDL is a good idea (Graduate Diploma in Law... but you probably already know that already). I know it's expensive but hopefully I'll be able to save up some money this year and while at uni. I'm entitled to a full bursary, grant etc. so that takes some of the pressure off.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Qualifications that are only useful for a very few jobs, that there are far too many already qualified to do those jobs in and for which the jobs are either not important, or not in demand.

    For example, sociology, psychology, film studies, media studies, English Literature etc.
    You'd be surprised at the lack of mental health practitioners in this country. The problem is, is not so much the degree per se, but the lack of people who go down the route of clinical psychology. Similarly you can make the argument that those people who study the Arts are not going into teaching (again an area that we are crying out for.)

    There is absolutely no point in making everyone pay to go to univiserty only to end up in loads of debt with little hope of a job at the end of it on mickey mouse courses.
    Word to the wise though, getting yourself an engineering, law or bio-med degree is not a fast-track to getting a job. Sorry 'well-paid' job.
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    (Original post by Laus)
    Thanks A&E. Good luck with Law I hope it gets you where you want to be. Do you think a GDL is a good idea (Graduate Diploma in Law... but you probably already know that already). I know it's expensive but hopefully I'll be able to save up some money this year and while at uni. I'm entitled to a full bursary, grant etc. so that takes some of the pressure off.
    Yep, it lets you decide what you want to do later rather than committing yourself now, it leaves a lot of doors open if it's not your thing, and if it is then it's another stepping stone to being a lawyer (if that's what you want). Apparantly employers really like non law graduates, as they have skills from other disciplines which law grads don't have.
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    Here is a report that I couldnt resist throwing into the mix, from the Taxpayers Allience:
    http://tpa.typepad.com/waste/files/n...eport_2007.pdf
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    AHAHAHA :eek: That has to be the pure deffinition of a MM degree:
    "Outdoor adventure with philosophy" omg :eek::eek:
    oh, oh and wait for it.... "Fashion Buying" :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
    Wait, theres more:
    "Model Making" thats just hillarious..
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    (Original post by ChrisRH)
    AHAHAHA :eek: That has to be the pure deffinition of a MM degree:
    "Outdoor adventure with philosophy" omg :eek::eek:
    oh, oh and wait for it.... "Fashion Buying" :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
    Wait, theres more:
    "Model Making" thats just hillarious..
    I quite liked the science degree:

    The University of Glamorgan also offers a BSc (Hons) to those who wish to
    study “Science: Fiction and Culture”:
    “Science fiction revolutionised the 20th century as the genre that dealt with
    scientific and technological progress and their relation to human society
    and ambition. It influenced our visions, dreams and deeds in all areas of
    science, society and culture and few areas of academic study are able to
    boast the broadness of education that a study of science and SF allows…
    On this unique degree, you will gain an understanding of the nature and
    evolution of science, and its social, political and cultural context, through
    the study of complementary strands of science, science fiction and
    culture.”
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    Derides the good name of science, i demand that the combination of characters 'science' is stricken from that degree immediatley!
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    (Original post by eDDeboo)
    Ancient History or Surf studies?
    Kinda obvious
    who is more likely to get a degree relevant and reasonably well paid job?

    i think the boys and girls building surfboards, running successful specialist retailers and surf schools might have an answer for that...
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    who is more likely to get a degree relevant and reasonably well paid job?

    i think the boys and girls building surfboards, running successful specialist retailers and surf schools might have an answer for that...
    Could be so kind as to introduce us to one of those people doing it, that actually went on a Surf Science degree. Thanks.
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    (Original post by Tasha89)
    but then why are they popular if it's difficult to get a decent job after studying them at uni?
    people want to work in those sectors - even though they haven't necessarily got the creativity or chutzpah to do so

    the government want peopel to go to uni

    the courses are 'low overhead ' courses so if the HEI in question wants to run the course the government powers that pebe will let the HEI and sod the fact that there aren't many jobs compared to students
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    (Original post by lilac spooge)
    <snip>
    and for the psycholgy argument...its a waste of time...theres to many people taking it for you to get a job and employers dont take it seriously enough as a degree if you want to try another type of undergrad job...
    becasue a psychology undergraduate degree i only part of the preparation for practice as a psychologist - you need work experience and post graduate studies to get chartered status and be eligable for HPC registration

    and the only way to get a job from it is to go into medicine first...yes that means 9years of university....have fun...

    im sorry about my spelling....
    i think you have confused Clinical Psychology with the medical speciality of Psychiatry ... Clinical Psychologists are NOT registered medical practitioners


    http://www.bps.org.uk/the-society/st...-questions.cfm

    http://www.prospects.ac.uk/cms/ShowPage/Home_page/Explore_types_of_jobs/Types_of_Job/p!eipaL?state=showocc&pageno=1&i dno=122

    http://www.psyclick.org.uk/
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    I'm sure people managed to run golf courses before this degree existed.

    And surely you'd also want to earn enough to cover the pointless debt you'd just got yourself in. If, as you say, education is not all about 'earning', then why go to uni at all? There are other ways of learning without the debt.
    without recognition of their skills and knowledge and without anything to show for their learning ...

    also some of the people doing some of these jobs would be doing so with a HE qualification which covered part of the role e.g. a business qualification or a agricultural qualification ...
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    Then why are entry requirements lower for these 'easy' degrees. Yeah, a subject could be at 'degree' level, but that is hardly a justification for its existence. Just because its 'a degree' does not make it the same level of difficulty or as useful as other subjects.
    point score is less to do with the content of the course and more to do with the popularity of the institution and the competition for places ...

    courses at 'popular' institutions ( i.e. old , red bricks and plate glass plus the ex poly 'tigers' e.g.g somewhere like Sheffield Hallam for quite a few of it;s subjects) will have higher points scores than Peckham Polytechnic ...

    a course with a shortage of places compared to places can pick and choose students hence the higher indicative points score, unless the law has changed, HEIs are still free to give people a "2 E offer" which was the way of giving people who were still studying at A level (equivalent) an unconditional offer
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    (Original post by ChrisRH)
    Not at all true, had they not needed to appear to have more 'degree' graduates you'd be studying at a polytechnic for an HND right now.
    a valid point

    if you look at many of the graduate entry roles in technical and professional areas people of our parents' and grandparents' generation did these jobs via apprenticeships and a HNC/D from nightschool at an FE college or poly ...

    however elsewhere in the world the equivalent qualification would be considered a degree hence the push to turn vocational HE qualifications into degrees whether foundation or bachelors
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    (Original post by ChrisRH)
    AHAHAHA :eek: That has to be the pure deffinition of a MM degree:
    "Outdoor adventure with philosophy" omg :eek::eek:
    the 'with philosophy' bit is typical of some HEIs who like the major /minor combination where it can be used

    the number and scope of 'problems' in the outdoor activities industry with people who are less than suitabily qualified for the roles is what leads to specific courses like this - historically the outdoor activities industry has been dominated by three groups of backgrounds - school teachers who have sought refuge from the hassle that teraching in schools brings, ex forces people who have a slew of NGB qualifications , demonstrable experience as SNCOs and officers in leading and managing ( but not necessarily working with young people or the niceties of H+S or business admin) and people who see NGB instructor qualificatiosn as a route to gettign paid for doing their hobby...


    oh, oh and wait for it.... "Fashion Buying" :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
    Wait, theres more:
    "Model Making" thats just hillarious..
    fashion buying - who is responsible for commissioning manufacturers, organising the manufactutrer ( and other aspects of the supply chain) to get this seasons fashions on the rail in your local shops? - oh yes that would be 'buyers' working in the fashion industry ... just like their buyers working for anyone who turns raw materials in products, combines componentsinto a product or searches out products to put on the shelves and rails or their employers shops...

    'model making'

    bespoke models are used in

    - prototyping + product design
    - planning and architecture
    - forensics
    - emergency planning
    - training and education for all sorts of things
    - museums etc.

    now tell me you don't need technical bods who can produce models for these purposes ...

    some of what industrial model makers did is now all computerised, but other times you just can't beat a physical model ...

    also industrial model makers will do things like produce the cutaway models of engines

    there's a job called 'engineer's toolmaker' which is very similar but is aobut producing fullscale prototype artefacts and there are also the 'production engineers' who turn prototypes and designsin producable products - are these roles 'mickey mouse' as well becuase they will be doing similar things
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    Mickey mouse degrees? Golf Management, wine tasting, surf studies :laugh:
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    who is more likely to get a degree relevant and reasonably well paid job?

    i think the boys and girls building surfboards, running successful specialist retailers and surf schools might have an answer for that...
    :laugh:
 
 
 
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