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    Am I the only one in the country that's going to uni because I want to learn more about a subject I find interesting?? Seriously, when did it become all about the money?

    I have to agree that some more traditional subjects like Law will probably lead to higher earning jobs, but to be honest, I'd prefer to be in an average paid job enjoying myself than working ridiculous hours to make more money doing something I don't enjoy.

    I have a friend doing Surf Studies, and although I think it's a bit of a strange degree and I'd accept it's probably not as hard as something like Law, I'm glad my friend is doing something he's interested in. Like me. By the way, I'm doing Psychology.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    without recognition of their skills and knowledge and without anything to show for their learning ...

    also some of the people doing some of these jobs would be doing so with a HE qualification which covered part of the role e.g. a business qualification or a agricultural qualification ...
    Well yes, maybe these people did have a business qualification, but it is hardly as limiting as a 'golf course' degree. What if there are no golf courses to manage? What then...?! At least with a business qualification (and even that is considered a soft option now), you would have more options open to you.
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    (Original post by pete-the-sparrow)
    Am I the only one in the country that's going to uni because I want to learn more about a subject I find interesting?? Seriously, when did it become all about the money?

    I have to agree that some more traditional subjects like Law will probably lead to higher earning jobs, but to be honest, I'd prefer to be in an average paid job enjoying myself than working ridiculous hours to make more money doing something I don't enjoy.

    I have a friend doing Surf Studies, and although I think it's a bit of a strange degree and I'd accept it's probably not as hard as something like Law, I'm glad my friend is doing something he's interested in. Like me. By the way, I'm doing Psychology.
    Exactly right. Once I graduate, I'll be working for little/no money for a long time, until I can work my way up. That's if I get the job I'd like anyway, but it's a tough industry to get into so even that's not guaranteed.
    I'll know though, whatever happens after I graduate, that I've done what I enjoy, and that I'll be able to get a job I enjoy, rather than working solely to make money.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Exactly right. Once I graduate, I'll be working for little/no money for a long time, until I can work my way up. That's if I get the job I'd like anyway, but it's a tough industry to get into so even that's not guaranteed.
    I'll know though, whatever happens after I graduate, that I've done what I enjoy, and that I'll be able to get a job I enjoy, rather than working solely to make money.
    My thoughts exactly.
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    I dont think its snobby to say that some subjects just shouldnt be degree subjects. Not because they're too easy or they're not traditional - but there are other channels for other things.

    As far as I'm concerned its the government's fault for setting their silly target that 50% of teenagers should go to University. All this does is make people who do not go for whatever reason feel inadequate and it belittles non-University qualifications like BTECs, NVQs, etc. which for some professsions and some areas are the best route and often more respected route.

    For example, think of the Accountancy profession. For years, it wasnt the norm for Accountants to go to University, they got their qualifications through other more vocational means which were highly recognised within the industry. Are we saying Accountancy is an 'easy' non-academic career path? Of course not. These days , its the total opposite, aspiring accountants feel they must go to University, when in the past this wasnt the case at all.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Qualifications that are only useful for a very few jobs, that there are far too many already qualified to do those jobs in and for which the jobs are either not important, or not in demand.

    For example, sociology, psychology, film studies, media studies, English Literature etc.

    If I was in government, I would give heavily subsidised university fees for degrees in demand (sciences, engineering) to remedy this.

    There is absolutely no point in making everyone pay to go to univiserty only to end up in loads of debt with little hope of a job at the end of it on mickey mouse courses.
    Very true well said. Sociology and psychology and lit. can lead you into a career, with lit. particularly journalism or if you have the talent writing books, but I take your point.

    I know someone who did a Mickey Mouse PhD, in brewing? You know alcohol, now not only is that not worth a PhD, but let's face it it's hard to advance the subject as many people have an interest in it, and are probably experts without the need to study.

    Zilly 50% is unachievable, although it has been achieved in some countries, this one included I think? Without free grants it's a pipe dream.

    I agree totally about NVQs and BTECs they are underrated sadly. Worse Apprenticeships are under exploited if you ask me.

    Give a chav a few alcopops and he will get an ASBO, give him/her a career option and he/she might get a job.
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    the best has to be...

    ''Coin Slot Technology''

    lmao
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    I am SERIOUSLY considering declining my offer to study Medicine and take up

    Outdoor adventure, at Marjon, the College of St Mark and St John in Plymouth

    Cos obv theres no such thing as a mickey mouse degree, only people's interests right?
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    Go for it.
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    (Original post by pete-the-sparrow)
    Am I the only one in the country that's going to uni because I want to learn more about a subject I find interesting?? Seriously, when did it become all about the money?.
    there are loads of people who love the subject they do. but for me uni is a necessity for getting my dream job - the annoying thing being there isnt really a degree thats very relevant to the position or one they recommend. also i actually hate everything about fulltime education (lectures, deadlines, exams, lifestyle etc) and im doing what im good at (computer science) rather than what i would probably find alot more interesting (eng) but also a lot harder. Part Time jobs are keeping me sane

    i would have much rather quit after dragging myself through alevels, but then i would have had little chance of going where i want to go
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    Exactly right. Once I graduate, I'll be working for little/no money for a long time, until I can work my way up. That's if I get the job I'd like anyway, but it's a tough industry to get into so even that's not guaranteed.
    So you'd rather enjoy three years of your life and then face stress and possible hard times for decades to come, rather than say, go for a degree such as law which, lets face it, is always going to land you in a well paying job of some description? Especially with the waves of litigation going on at the moment. How odd.
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    (Original post by ssk2)
    So you'd rather enjoy three years of your life and then face stress and possible hard times for decades to come, rather than say, go for a degree such as law which, lets face it, is always going to land you in a well paying job of some description? Especially with the waves of litigation going on at the moment. How odd.

    Exactly, I'd rather enjoy my life, yes. These three years, and any after where I use the skills I've learnt; if that happens to be in my dream career, all the better.
    If I end up graduating and then being unable to find work within that career, then I'll take up an office job or something similar and use what I've learnt as a hobby; since I'll be able to make films, I'll enter them into competitions or start up my own small company. No, I don't expect to make big money that way - but I'd much rather be poorer and happier, than spend my life using a law degree when that really doesn't interest me.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Exactly, I'd rather enjoy my life, yes. These three years, and any after where I use the skills I've learnt; if that happens to be in my dream career, all the better.
    If I end up graduating and then being unable to find work within that career, then I'll take up an office job or something similar and use what I've learnt as a hobby; since I'll be able to make films, I'll enter them into competitions or start up my own small company. No, I don't expect to make big money that way - but I'd much rather be poorer and happier, than spend my life using a law degree when that really doesn't interest me.
    That's really the whole issue with some of these degrees.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Qualifications that are only useful for a very few jobs, that there are far too many already qualified to do those jobs in and for which the jobs are either not important, or not in demand.

    For example, sociology, psychology, film studies, media studies, English Literature etc.

    If I was in government, I would give heavily subsidised university fees for degrees in demand (sciences, engineering) to remedy this.

    There is absolutely no point in making everyone pay to go to univiserty only to end up in loads of debt with little hope of a job at the end of it on mickey mouse courses.
    The sciences fees are already far more subsidised than the ones your examples. They do experiments and are generally in for 20 hours a week, where as in artsy subjects hours are generally around the 10 mark.
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    (Original post by pete-the-sparrow)
    Am I the only one in the country that's going to uni because I want to learn more about a subject I find interesting??
    That is loser talk for "I am doing a mickey-mouse degree".
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    (Original post by pete-the-sparrow)
    Am I the only one in the country that's going to uni because I want to learn more about a subject I find interesting?? Seriously, when did it become all about the money?
    I find my subject very interesting too but then one cannot just live on passions alone.
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    nah, any degree
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    In my parents' days University was free because so few people got in.

    Now with all these halfwits getting in (I'm not saying I'm not potentially one of them, mind you) doing rubbish subjects that is no longer possible.

    That is why I think that students who do real subjects should be paid through uni.
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    "Mickey Mouse" degrees are ones that won't get you very far in the 'world of work', are not respected by employers or society in general, or generally don't require as much determination, intelligence and dedication as more traditional subjects.

    But that said, a large number of degrees are (IMHO) wrongly labeled Micky Mouse subjects; Film Studies, Philosophy, Sociology to name a few. Just because something does not directly relate to a career does not make it worthless. In the end, do what you want but don't expect to be employed as a war-correspondent with a degree in 'American Studies and Disney'.
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    no idea but i lke the name 'mickey mouse' degree. lol
 
 
 
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