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British universities vs Dutch universities

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    Right so I'm applying for 5 British universities here in the UK (Nottingham/Glasgow are my aspirational unis but I'd go for Notts since its closer to my hometown). I'm also applying to Dutch universities as well which I've read about a lot and really like the ones I've applied to.

    My mind ends up changing every other day and there's pros and cons of going to either a British or a Dutch uni.

    Pros of going to a Dutch uni- It's much cheaper, it has my course taught in English, they do internships at publishing houses (which is what I want to go into) and my aspirational Dutch uni is in an amazing city.

    Cons of going to a Dutch uni- Holidays are way shorter, workload is incredibly intense in the first year, uni starts on the 1st September and I don't get any student loans (so basically would have to rely on my family for income)


    My friends are saying that I'd probably be better off at a Dutch uni but I'm honestly torn between a British uni or a Dutch one. I've applied to my Dutch unis and just need to put in my grades. I'm sending off my UCAS next week.


    Any opinions?



    Josb
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    I already told you to go to the Netherlands. Speaking another language is very recommended for the job you want. And Dutch unis are respected everywhere in Europe.

    Starting your career free of debt is also enjoyable.

    That said, European unis are indeed harder than Anglo-saxon due to lighter selection, so you must be motivated.

    Moreover, it is possibly your last chance to enjoy the EU before Brexit.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    I already told you to go to the Netherlands. Speaking another language is very recommended for the job you want. And Dutch unis are respected everywhere in Europe.

    Starting your career free of debt is also enjoyable.

    That said, European unis are indeed harder than Anglo-saxon due to lighter selection, so you must be motivated.

    Moreover, it is possibly your last chance to enjoy the EU before Brexit.
    Oh yeah you did! Yeah my course is Linguistics and Dutch (if I was fluent in Dutch I could learn French ). What do you mean by the bolded bit though?
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    What do you mean by the bolded bit though?
    In many countries in Europe, entry requirements are fairly low. It's easy to get into a course (even at the best national unis), but very hard to graduate without a **** degree or being kicked out of the course.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Right so I'm applying for 5 British universities here in the UK (Nottingham/Glasgow are my aspirational unis but I'd go for Notts since its closer to my hometown). I'm also applying to Dutch universities as well which I've read about a lot and really like the ones I've applied to.

    My mind ends up changing every other day and there's pros and cons of going to either a British or a Dutch uni.

    Pros of going to a Dutch uni- It's much cheaper, it has my course taught in English, they do internships at publishing houses (which is what I want to go into) and my aspirational Dutch uni is in an amazing city.

    Cons of going to a Dutch uni- Holidays are way shorter, workload is incredibly intense in the first year, uni starts on the 1st September and I don't get any student loans (so basically would have to rely on my family for income)


    My friends are saying that I'd probably be better off at a Dutch uni but I'm honestly torn between a British uni or a Dutch one. I've applied to my Dutch unis and just need to put in my grades. I'm sending off my UCAS next week.


    Any opinions?



    Josb
    Would you be happy being so far away from home? You say Nottingham is your first choice UK uni due to being closer to your hometown, yet you are also looking at unis in the Netherlands! Also have you confirmed with your parents that they would be able to fund you fully.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    In many countries in Europe, entry requirements are fairly low. It's easy to get into a course (even at the best national unis), but very hard to graduate without a **** degree or being kicked out of the course.
    Yeah I have to get over 80% or something at a Dutch uni to pass. It seems so daunting :/

    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Would you be happy being so far away from home? You say Nottingham is your first choice UK uni due to being closer to your hometown, yet you are also looking at unis in the Netherlands! Also have you confirmed with your parents that they would be able to fund you fully.

    Yeah I'd be fine. I like the unis I'm looking at and my other reason for liking Nottingham over a Scottish uni is that it's cheaper.

    I've spoken to my dad and he said that he doesn't mind helping me too much.
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    I'm not sure I buy into the 'European universities are harder' myth. It is different, certainly, but not harder. I believe Dutch universities have a lot of group work and peer-to-peer learning (students teaching classes, giving talks etc) - if you enjoy that kind of learning environment then go for it.

    Other than relying on your parents to support you financially, I can't think of any disadvantage of studying in the Netherlands. Can they afford it?
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    You should also check the Dutch welfare system because they may give support to students, like in some other EU countries.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I'm not sure I buy into the 'European universities are harder' myth. It is different, certainly, but not harder. I believe Dutch universities have a lot of group work and peer-to-peer learning (students teaching classes, giving talks etc) - if you enjoy that kind of learning environment then go for it.

    Other than relying on your parents to support you financially, I can't think of any disadvantage of studying in the Netherlands. Can they afford it?
    Yeah they can. I'm planning to work over the summer too.

    (Original post by Josb)
    You should also check the Dutch welfare system because they may give support to students, like in some other EU countries.
    I did do that yeah and they don't give any loans (apart from a tuition fee one) to British students. You get a grant if you work 8 hours a week or something but they don't recommend it because of workload :/
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    I don't think there's much comparison between the percieved reputation of top UK unis vs top Dutch unis, but if you can see past that, and accept that Holland offers some excellent universities (relative to the continent) I think it becomes a no-brainer.

    Second language, internships, reputable university (I hope!) and debt free...

    Vs getting caught up in the RG bubble here in the UK and sacrificing your salary for your education. Of course, I'd look where (geographically) you want to work after uni, and see what prospective firms value (as ultimately, it's about getting a job).
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    I don't think there's much comparison between the percieved reputation of top UK unis vs top Dutch unis, but if you can see past that, and accept that Holland offers some excellent universities (relative to the continent) I think it becomes a no-brainer.

    Second language, internships, reputable university (I hope!) and debt free...

    Vs getting caught up in the RG bubble here in the UK and sacrificing your salary for your education. Of course, I'd look where (geographically) you want to work after uni, and see what prospective firms value (as ultimately, it's about getting a job).

    I'm kind of worried the workload at the Dutch university is going to be too intense and I end up getting kicked out or something. Also I don't really want to rely on my parents too much for uni so on the other hand at least I'd have student loans to fall back on if I went to uni here.
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    Workload is too intense? If others have done it in the past then you can do it, and it seems like a call to adventure
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    Workload is too intense? If others have done it in the past then you can do it, and it seems like a call to adventure
    I think it's because I'll be in a country I've never been to. It's annoying because I say to myself that I'll defo go to a Dutch uni and then I change my mind the next day
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    I'm kind of worried the workload at the Dutch university is going to be too intense and I end up getting kicked out or something. Also I don't really want to rely on my parents too much for uni so on the other hand at least I'd have student loans to fall back on if I went to uni here.
    I wouldn't worry about the work load. That's more about organization and time management than capability... And your parents are there to help believe it or not! I'm sure they'd rather you relied on them for three short years than landed yourself with £40K worth or debt between student loands and tuiton... That's if they can afford it of course, if they can't, then come to Glasgow instead... We're a great city, fantastic uni and you'll enjoy it all the same.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    I think it's because I'll be in a country I've never been to. It's annoying because I say to myself that I'll defo go to a Dutch uni and then I change my mind the next day
    You might be salty later on if you dont go. But I can understand why you would be worried I changed schools which is not that similar but still I was nervous af days before joining
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    I wouldn't worry about the work load. That's more about organization and time management than capability... And your parents are there to help believe it or not! I'm sure they'd rather you relied on them for three short years than landed yourself with £40K worth or debt between student loands and tuiton... That's if they can afford it of course, if they can't, then come to Glasgow instead... We're a great city, fantastic uni and you'll enjoy it all the same.
    Yeah I think if I kind of revise regularly in small doses getting through exams should be okish. I don't really want to rely on my dad too much but I think I would consider getting a job during my time at uni to keep myself going.

    Glasgow accents are pretty adorable too
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Yeah I think if I kind of revise regularly in small doses getting through exams should be okish. I don't really want to rely on my dad too much but I think I would consider getting a job during my time at uni to keep myself going.

    Glasgow accents are pretty adorable too
    Yep, the workload will be more than manageable. I've heard from students who have went to Europe as part of ERASMUS that the work load seems more intense but it's easier to score higher grades - of course this will vary from uni to uni, but maybe worth noting.

    A job is a good shout and not to brag, but I do think we have the best accent this side of the border... The rest make me cringe (sorry Edinburgh!).
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    Yep, the workload will be more than manageable. I've heard from students who have went to Europe as part of ERASMUS that the work load seems more intense but it's easier to score higher grades - of course this will vary from uni to uni, but maybe worth noting.

    A job is a good shout and not to brag, but I do think we have the best accent this side of the border... The rest make me cringe (sorry Edinburgh!).

    I hope so! I've applied for Linguistics and Dutch and I honestly hope I do well enough to pass and get through the years!

    Money's my main worry going abroad.

    Yes you doo
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    You might be salty later on if you dont go. But I can understand why you would be worried I changed schools which is not that similar but still I was nervous af days before joining
    Yeah I guess. If the Dutch government offered student loans then I would pick that in a heartbeat.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Right so I'm applying for 5 British universities here in the UK (Nottingham/Glasgow are my aspirational unis but I'd go for Notts since its closer to my hometown). I'm also applying to Dutch universities as well which I've read about a lot and really like the ones I've applied to.

    My mind ends up changing every other day and there's pros and cons of going to either a British or a Dutch uni.

    Pros of going to a Dutch uni- It's much cheaper, it has my course taught in English, they do internships at publishing houses (which is what I want to go into) and my aspirational Dutch uni is in an amazing city.

    Cons of going to a Dutch uni- Holidays are way shorter, workload is incredibly intense in the first year, uni starts on the 1st September and I don't get any student loans (so basically would have to rely on my family for income)


    My friends are saying that I'd probably be better off at a Dutch uni but I'm honestly torn between a British uni or a Dutch one. I've applied to my Dutch unis and just need to put in my grades. I'm sending off my UCAS next week.


    Any opinions?



    Josb
    I am also applying to Dutch universities and English universities, for the sciences. Granted I am a non-EU international student so money is less of a concern for me because my parents will probably have to pay approximately the same amount whereever I choose to go. (Other than in America because education there is way too expensive) I believe you should follow what your heart whatever decision you make. But like the people who said this above, graduating in debt is not really ideal and enjoying EU membership while it lasts is a wonderful thing.
 
 
 
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