F2 specialties advice

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    Hey all,

    I am an F1 doctor currently on a busy surgical firm, with two busy medical jobs coming up later this year. I would quite like a more relaxed and well-supported F2 year having realised the error of my ways. I was wondering if anyone had any advice with regards to what jobs they recommend for F2?

    I am defs gna try for a GP or Psych job (ideally wanted both - but unfortunately my trust next year doesn't allow you to do both in the same year). So i'm now thinking paeds/o+g/A+E. I know that A+E can be very busy, but i've heard often very well supported? Any advice would be hugely appreciated.
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    Paeds and A&E are definitely the better supported specialties. Anything quite specialised generally is too.

    I wouldn't necessarily say psych is well supported. It sounds like being the psych on call can feel pretty lonely, if your hospital makes F2s be on call.

    But bear in mind that as an fy2 you'll be expected to step right up in terms of your independence. I'll never forget the reaction the Fy1s had to me arriving on the ward for my first day as fy2 in ortho. They were so glad we were there to 'take over', bearing in mind that I had no more ortho knowledge than them (it in fact had been a whole extra year since we did it in med school) but you're expected to fulfil that role so that's what you have to do.
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    Paeds is a generally well supported specialty - daily consultant ward rounds, good SpR support. *Can be very busy - varies depending on where you do it and what time of year. *In many places you are expected to cross cover neonatal unit as well. *

    I think paeds is a great job in FY2 - you're on the SHO rota and are expected to do everythng, but there is good support. *Some people take to paeds and love it, others find it a bit intimidating doing paediatric procedures / going to deliveries / reviewing babies. *But even people who were a bit overwhelmed at the beginning usually love it by the end. *I would particularly recommend paeds if you're thinking of GP for ST, as lots of GPs don't get to do a paeds job during their training. *

    Also, you get to play with toys and will learn lots of skills like making animals out of glove balloons *I can now do a pretty good elephant...*
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    None of those jobs are relaxed...although they are probably more supported than medicine/surgery.
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    Paeds and A&E are very well supported in most good hospitals. I personally found A&E quite a relaxing job - you end up sharing all the patients that come through the door with lots of SHOs, SpRs, consultants, nurse practitioners, etc. It's not just you with a ward of sick patients and a list of jobs you know you can't possibly complete... The hours are often anti-social but working long shifts often means compensatory time off. You also leave as soon as your shift finishes... there's no pressure (or reason to) to hang around after handover.

    I suspect that A&E in a DGH would be a less fulfilling experience as it might not be as well-supported and there are fewer colleagues with which to share the load. I am happy to be corrected about this, though!
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    Maybe you should talk to the colleagues doing those jobs in the specific hospital you will be working. I have found my peads job in FY2 to be unsupported and very scary. Good experience, I learnt a lot but was pushed to my absolute limits. I found AE much more relaxed.
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    GP is definitely very relaxed, and very well supported. I'm doing GP as an F2 at the moment and I don't see a single patient who I don't then discuss with one of the GPs, and you get longer to see them (at least to start with) so it's all very manageable compared to being an actual GP. There's also less pressure in GP generally in that people are less acutely unwell (on the whole!) so you've got time on your side and can always just give people a ring if you've more to add. Only thing I dislike is home visits but it's a service that has to be provided, so. I wouldn't say I'm enjoying it but it's definitely worthwhile experience. Honestly I'm learning loads, it's the most interaction I've ever had with a senior colleague by a million miles! I would actually describe this job as 'training' :P

    I've learnt more useful medicine in the last 2 months than I feel I learnt in all of last year, there is something great about exposure to truly general medicine.
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    Hi Folks,

    Thanks for the replies - very useful. Seems like a mixed bag of responses, but I guess inevitably each rotation and how well supported etc it is very much depends on the hospital.

    I can barely cannulate adults, let alone be doing practical procedures on children!!

    I think the medical SHO rota is hard and it sounds like there's a definite step up in terms of responsibility and expectation...I've hated surgery as an F1 and really don't want to do any more of it! So maybe a year of paeds and O+G, whilst equally demanding - may be a nice change?

    If anyone else has any suggestions or advice, I would be v.grateful!
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    I loved my foundation job in paeds, there is ready recognition that you wont have had much experience in undergrad, so you get loads of support, and you aren't expected to be able to independently do procedures from the beginning. I also find paeds consultants (and nurses) more friendly than on average and there's a great team atmosphere. Its also a gold mine in terms of learning generic skills like prioritisation, emergency/chronic management, communication skills.....
 
 
 
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