How important do you think university prestige is to employers? Watch

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thesard
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#21
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#21
OP: What do you actually want to do? I mean, are you just having last-minute jangles at the thought of living so far outside of your comfort zone? If so, you're likely to, in a sense, replace your friends (you'll still have your hone friends though!). Ypur parents are only a train ride away and they could always visit you, or you-them.

I would definitely choose Warwick, if only to take the opportunity. Otherwise, I'm of the mind that preference should come first over 'what might attract employers' but that's because I'm aiming for a first which, I hope, should be enough for employers.
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smallteapot
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#22
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To be honest I'm still not sure what area I want to go into, which is partly why I chose English as a course, simply because I have a real love for it. But publishing/civil service/finance jobs are the options I'm thinking about. And I know in particular that the publishing environment is highly competitive.

I do have a fear about moving out of my comfort zone, but it's also a worry that my performance might suffer if I'm cut off from everything I know for very long periods of time...However from the comments in this thread, that's going to be a very common experience and something I might have to push myself to do.

As a result I think I feel more comfortable about taking the step to becoming more independent as in the end it's going to be me on my own in the job market.:eek:
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Bleached
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#23
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a few of my friends moved away to do Dentistry, she is absolutely loving it right now, maybe you will too, but there are some people who get home sick etc and commuting home reguarly is not practical.
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simon123
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#24
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(Original post by smallteapot)
To be honest I'm still not sure what area I want to go into, which is partly why I chose English as a course, simply because I have a real love for it. But publishing/civil service/finance jobs are the options I'm thinking about. And I know in particular that the publishing environment is highly competitive.

I do have a fear about moving out of my comfort zone, but it's also a worry that my performance might suffer if I'm cut off from everything I know for very long periods of time...However from the comments in this thread, that's going to be a very common experience and something I might have to push myself to do.

As a result I think I feel more comfortable about taking the step to becoming more independent as in the end it's going to be me on my own in the job market.:eek:

Thats more like it! Just go for it everyone worries and you will think to yourself that you were daft to be so worried once you have settled in after a few weeks. Warwick is a great university that will give you the opportunities to move into any career area that you wish, and the student union is huge so you dont need to worry about not meeting people.
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swallows
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#25
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I would say go to Warwick - it has a certain pulling power employment-wise as a lot of people have said. It also seems silly to go through school and to get top grades only then to decide at the last minute not to go to the best uni that you can - why bother trying at school at all? If you thought that Warwick itself wasn't right for you and that Essex etc. have more to offer then I would advise differently, but it seems that your main worry has nothing to do with the uni itself, just that you are nervous about being too far from home. A lot of people experience that and as I say, it would be silly to turn down the chance to do English at Warwick out of fear.

If, after a year, you feel like you'd like to change then it should be relatively simple to transfer from Warwick to somewhere closer to home, but I would say definitely give it a go!
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Good bloke
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#26
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(Original post by Lolly-88)
No I'm not wrong. I wasn't talking about banking or financial institutions because the OP hasn't referred to wanting a career in that industry and her degree choice suggests that she probably doesn't want to do something like that anyway. Therefore it's of no relevance what employers in those industries do.

People on TSR are so obsessed with financial institutions. :rolleyes:
You are wrong. The original question was couched in very general terms about employers generally rather than the ones the OP was interested in; and, of course, she is potentially interested in a financial career as evidenced by her own statement and the economics A level.

In any event, my discussion of the financial services industry was only an example. Other industries take just as much interest in where you went to university when considering applicants for the top jobs. It is much better, in most subjects, to be a Warwick graduate than a UEA graduate or a Portsmouth graduate.
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Lolly-88
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(Original post by Good bloke)
You are wrong. The original question was couched in very general terms about employers generally rather than the ones the OP was interested in; and, of course, she is potentially interested in a financial career as evidenced by her own statement and the economics A level.

In any event, my discussion of the financial services industry was only an example. Other industries take just as much interest in where you went to university when considering applicants for the top jobs. It is much better, in most subjects, to be a Warwick graduate than a UEA graduate or a Portsmouth graduate.
If you seriously think that alot of employers ( in all types of indusries) would throw an application in the bin based purely on university reputation alone or care that much about it then personally I think you are seriously delusional.
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philyb
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#28
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Depends on the degree, and what you want to do. I think you have a better chance if you go to a better uni, but it really does depend on the degree. I know that for some of the stuff I want to do, if I have an impressive portfolio which demonstrates my skills and abilities, then people are more likely to hire me.
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Arminius
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#29
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i think with your academic background warwick would suit you better. Theres alot to be said for being with people on a similar level, you will gain alot of motivation, contacts etc.

Job prospect wise warwick will help, it will make things easier in most jobs and for certain sectors you would need to be from warwick-level unis to even have a chance.

People will say that it does not matter too much, and they have some valid point s. I would say go where you like the most, but you don;t seem to have raised any reason to dislike warwick apart from some normal pre-uni nerves.
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goodmen
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#30
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I'm sure university prestige does matter to alot of employees but people who are saying alevel grades do are completley out of their minds
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simon123
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#31
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(Original post by goodmen)
I'm sure university prestige does matter to alot of employees but people who are saying alevel grades do are completley out of their minds
Well they do actually matter as for the top graduate jobs they have A Level requirements stated. For Investment Banks and I think TCs with city law firms anything less than ABB and your going to be struggling.
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swallows
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#32
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Yup, for quite a few jobs I've had a random look at, minumum A level grades are specified, usually in the ABB-BBB range - which is really rather interesting and very much linked to this discussion. Apparently, to weed out candidates who may well have a good degree grade but who went to less reputable unis, they make this stipulation. It's based on the assumption that if you went to a less 'prestigious' uni you are likely to have grades of lower than BBB. It's basically a way of slashing all of the applicants from lower ranked unis without having to hear cries of 'discrimination!' Does that make sense?
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Agamemnon
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#33
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(Original post by swallows)
Apparently, to weed out candidates who may well have a good degree grade but who went to less reputable unis, they make this stipulation. It's based on the assumption that if you went to a less 'prestigious' uni you are likely to have grades of lower than BBB.
Hmm... that's wrong, if it does happen. As people can change at university, and develop intellectually.
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Bleached
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#34
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(Original post by Agamemnon)
Hmm... that's wrong, if it does happen. As people can change at university, and develop intellectually.
no offense, are you saying that because your arnt going to one? following on from what you just said, wouldnt the other people also develop?

Edit: Looking at your list of potential universities. and i mean you said people develop intelectually, would others so the difference will be proportional?
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Agamemnon
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#35
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(Original post by Bleached)
no offense, are you saying that because your arnt going to one? following on from what you just said, wouldnt the other people also develop?
I'm sorry I don't understand. Because I'm not going where? What other people?
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simon123
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#36
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(Original post by Agamemnon)
I'm sorry I don't understand. Because I'm not going where? What other people?
I think he means because you are not applying to a top 10 university.
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SFC_FOREVER!
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#37
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Whilst a 1st Class Honours in Maths from Oxford can only be beneficial, many employers are looking for more than just a degree. Relevant work experience in your chosen field and other experiences apart from academic are vital.

A degree from any University is good, it shows you can learn. Mix that with some experience (which many students don't have) and you will be fine.
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Agamemnon
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#38
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(Original post by simon123)
I think he means because you are not applying to a top 10 university.
I should be going to a top 20 university though, and the ABB-BBB range the poster mentioned, would include my university and my grades, so my personal circumstances do not cloud my judgement on this issue as he suggests.
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ChemistBoy
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#39
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Why do people have such a downer on UEA? It's a very good university (top 20 in the sunday times). The most important thing is getting a 2:1 and that is best achieved by being at a university you are happy with.

(Original post by Bleached)
no offense, are you saying that because your arnt going to one? following on from what you just said, wouldnt the other people also develop?

Edit: Looking at your list of potential universities. and i mean you said people develop intelectually, would others so the difference will be proportional?
Not everyone develops in a linear fashion and yes, people can overtake other people. I beat a lot of people who had much better A-level grades than me at St Andrews.
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JohnyJ
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#40
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Whilst a 1st Class Honours in Maths from Oxford can only be beneficial, many employers are looking for more than just a degree. Relevant work experience in your chosen field and other experiences apart from academic are vital.
Unfortunately, its a vicious circle that can be hard to penetrate. Getting relevant work experience is extremely difficult, and because of the competition for internships etc, you need to have strong A-levels and a good university just to get that experience. Thus university reputation is important.
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