Join TSR now and get answers to all your questions about uniSign up now

Want to do a post graduate in medicine... (Funding issues)

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm considering doing biomedicine as an undergraduate and then taking a postgraduate in medicine. However, I have no idea how I'm going to fund it
    So far, what I have gathered is that student loans can only be taken out on undergraduate courses and that postgraduates can only get a fund of £6000 for the 4 year course. However, tution fees are £9000 × 4 years (£36000). I'm really passionate about doing medicine but now I feel like I can't do it

    P.S Before anyone asks there's no way I can do any other paths into medicine
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scarlett1975)
    I'm considering doing biomedicine as an undergraduate and then taking a postgraduate in medicine. However, I have no idea how I'm going to fund it
    So far, what I have gathered is that student loans can only be taken out on undergraduate courses and that postgraduates can only get a fund of £6000 for the 4 year course. However, tution fees are £9000 × 4 years (£36000). I'm really passionate about doing medicine but now I feel like I can't do it

    P.S Before anyone asks there's no way I can do any other paths into medicine
    1. Its not a postgraduate in medicine. It is still an undergraduate level degree but it is graduate entry.
    2. Graduates currently do not get tuition fee funding if they apply to the 5 year course (until year 5 when the NHS pays). However, they do get funding for the graduate entry, 4 year programmes. You need £3465 up front the first year and get loans for the rest. The NHS pays that amount for the final 3 years.

    if you can get the grades now, then apply for medicine straight off. GEM is not a route to aim for if you can help it. Why can you not aim for medicine now?

    Those funding terms are how it is now. But 1. tuition fees are increasing and 2. NHS funding is stopping for other healthcare courses so this is all liable to change by the time you get there.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForestCat)
    1. Its not a postgraduate in medicine. It is still an undergraduate level degree but it is graduate entry.
    2. Graduates currently do not get tuition fee funding if they apply to the 5 year course (until year 5 when the NHS pays). However, they do get funding for the graduate entry, 4 year programmes. You need £3465 up front the first year and get loans for the rest. The NHS pays that amount for the final 3 years.

    if you can get the grades now, then apply for medicine straight off. GEM is not a route to aim for if you can help it. Why can you not aim for medicine now?

    Those funding terms are how it is now. But 1. tuition fees are increasing and 2. NHS funding is stopping for other healthcare courses so this is all liable to change by the time you get there.
    I don't take the subject Chemistry, so I don't have the entry requirements for ANY medical schools.
    Why is GEM not a good route?
    (THANK YOU for replying)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scarlett1975)
    I don't take the subject Chemistry, so I don't have the entry requirements for ANY medical schools.
    Why is GEM not a good route?
    (THANK YOU for replying)
    GEM is more competitive than undergrad entry for medicine
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Might be easier if you take up chemistry now? Doesn't biomedicine need some chemistry?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I don't know much about medicine, but couldn't you do a gap year to do Chemistry privately? I doubt it would count as taking three/fours years to sit your A-Levels as its you taking up a new subject. I could be wrong though, as I'm not a medic! Good luck :-)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scarlett1975)
    I'm considering doing biomedicine as an undergraduate and then taking a postgraduate in medicine. However, I have no idea how I'm going to fund it
    So far, what I have gathered is that student loans can only be taken out on undergraduate courses and that postgraduates can only get a fund of £6000 for the 4 year course. However, tution fees are £9000 × 4 years (£36000). I'm really passionate about doing medicine but now I feel like I can't do it

    P.S Before anyone asks there's no way I can do any other paths into medicine
    They do pay your tuition fees - you just have to come up with £3500.

    The main barrier is just how competitive graduate entry is - way more than undergrad. It such a shame that you can't apply to courses with a foundation year - the ones set up specifically for people who didn't have the right subjects - they would have seemed perfect for you. Its also a shame that its impossible for you to take a gap year to take up chemistry, although this option would need you to contact individual unis to make sure they're ok with that.

    But you've said graduate entry is the only option you can do and you wouldn't say that for no reason I'm sure!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForestCat)
    NHS funding is stopping for other healthcare courses so this is all liable to change by the time you get there.
    I rang student finance the other day, and apparently all NHS Bursarys have been scrapped and are likely to be replaced by SFE for 2017 entry. :O
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Last year the Govt have introduced a student loan system for masters courses almost identical to the undergraduate student loans, based on the fact that longevity is increasing, and people are working to age of 70-75. One thing that would disallow this option is if a potential student is over 60, which I am sure you are far from (!!)

    Second thing to check is if a second undergraduate degree (in your case, medicine) would fall within the criteria required for this new type of loan. It is mainly for MSc and MA, as PhDs are usually funded.

    (Specialist A level Science tutor for Entry into Medicine)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Newcastle doesn't require chemistry JS


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by macpatelgh)
    Last year the Govt have introduced a student loan system for masters courses almost identical to the undergraduate student loans, based on the fact that longevity is increasing, and people are working to age of 70-75. One thing that would disallow this option is if a potential student is over 60, which I am sure you are far from (!!)

    Second thing to check is if a second undergraduate degree (in your case, medicine) would fall within the criteria required for this new type of loan. It is mainly for MSc and MA, as PhDs are usually funded.

    (Specialist A level Science tutor for Entry into Medicine)
    Graduate Medicine is an UNDERGRADUATE 4 YEAR COURSE.

    The PG Loans are for ONE YEAR POSTGRADUATE TAUGHT MASTERS COURSES. There is no such thing as a 1 year course that qualifies you as a doctor.

    Can I suggest you do your homework before you even think about advising anyone about 'Entry to Medicine'?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scarlett1975)
    I don't take the subject Chemistry, so I don't have the entry requirements for ANY medical schools.
    Why is GEM not a good route?
    (THANK YOU for replying)
    Probably too late for this year, but if you have other A Levels which meet the criteria (normally A*AA or AAA) most admissions departments are fine with you applying with pending A level Chemistry, so long as you do the full course in 1 year, and you will get a conditional offer based on your result. Just make sure to email all the admissions departments before applying.
    If funding is a problem, I heavily recommend not going for graduate entry medicine.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Useful website : http://www.money4medstudents.org/med...-second-degree
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hi Migrant (From E Europe??),

    Correct, the PG loan is for PG Masters, as I have clearly pointed out - for your info, there is such a thing as a discretionary loan, which excellent students can be awarded, just like I was awarded a discretionary grant in my day as I had broken a 150 year old Chemistry record at a leading public school at A level.

    I don't need to "think about advising on entry to medicine" since I have physically taught and successfully helped hundreds of A level students into medicine in practice.

    BTW. anyone can type a few boolean search criteria into google! - my apologies if you have any outstanding achievements, such as my being top student in the whole of Kenya at GCSE.

    Thanks for the comment!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by macpatelgh)
    Hi Migrant (From E Europe??),

    Correct, the PG loan is for PG Masters, as I have clearly pointed out - for your info, there is such a thing as a discretionary loan, which excellent students can be awarded, just like I was awarded a discretionary grant in my day as I had broken a 150 year old Chemistry record at a leading public school at A level.

    I don't need to "think about advising on entry to medicine" since I have physically taught and successfully helped hundreds of A level students into medicine in practice.

    BTW. anyone can type a few boolean search criteria into google! - my apologies if you have any outstanding achievements, such as my being top student in the whole of Kenya at GCSE.

    Thanks for the comment!
    Can you provide details of this discretionary loan, as I have never heard about it before. Nor would I imagine it would apply to medicine.

    There is a lot of misinformation floating around about medicine. You said to check whether medicine would apply and returnmigrant was pointing out that by its very definition it is not a postgraduate course and thus at the same level as existing degrees, automatically disqualifying GEM applicants.

    I really have no idea why your personal achievements were relevant to this discussion, except perhaps as a humble brag. Nor does returnmigrant's nationality, though I suggest you pay better attention to their name.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Apologies for the diversion and incidental bragging, but when an apparently inexperienced person attempts to advise a person who has been through a gruelling 6 year training schedule in medicine as to the content of a medical degree, the discussion tends to stray.

    As for your question regarding discretionary awards, although everything in life has become automated and compartmentalized via the advent of technology, fortunately a very infinitesimal fragment of a human touch has been retained, so if you were to write a letter, superbly phrased and drafted, by (Royal Mail) to the Student Loan decision makers, it is remotely possible for them to bypass the laid down rules for an exceptional student. This is in a similar vein to getting a loan from a bank with a bad credit record, if you can convince the bank that you are not going to run away with their money (this is, of course, only possible by personal communication, but impossible by just applying digitally.

    Good luck!
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by macpatelgh)
    Hi Migrant (From E Europe??),
    just like I was awarded a discretionary grant in my day as I had broken a 150 year old Chemistry record at a leading public school at A level.

    Stop showing off. It's very un-British.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by macpatelgh)
    Apologies for the diversion and incidental bragging, but when an apparently inexperienced person attempts to advise a person who has been through a gruelling 6 year training schedule in medicine as to the content of a medical degree, the discussion tends to stray.

    As for your question regarding discretionary awards, although everything in life has become automated and compartmentalized via the advent of technology, fortunately a very infinitesimal fragment of a human touch has been retained, so if you were to write a letter, superbly phrased and drafted, by (Royal Mail) to the Student Loan decision makers, it is remotely possible for them to bypass the laid down rules for an exceptional student. This is in a similar vein to getting a loan from a bank with a bad credit record, if you can convince the bank that you are not going to run away with their money (this is, of course, only possible by personal communication, but impossible by just applying digitally.

    Good luck!
    That really isn't how it is done in this country. There are strict criteria about student loans, to try and ensure fairness to all. Writing a letter is not going to make you exempt from these rules. And even if there were such a thing, it wouldn't be available for all of the thousands of excellent students who apply to graduate entry medicine each year.


    At no point was returnmigrant discussing the content of a medical degree. They are experienced and knowledgable about university admissions and make a number of helpful posts in this area across the site. Nor did your humble bragging relate in any way to the topic being discussed.
    Online

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by macpatelgh)
    Apologies for the diversion and incidental bragging, but when an apparently inexperienced person attempts to advise a person who has been through a gruelling 6 year training schedule in medicine as to the content of a medical degree, the discussion tends to stray.

    As for your question regarding discretionary awards, although everything in life has become automated and compartmentalized via the advent of technology, fortunately a very infinitesimal fragment of a human touch has been retained, so if you were to write a letter, superbly phrased and drafted, by (Royal Mail) to the Student Loan decision makers, it is remotely possible for them to bypass the laid down rules for an exceptional student. This is in a similar vein to getting a loan from a bank with a bad credit record, if you can convince the bank that you are not going to run away with their money (this is, of course, only possible by personal communication, but impossible by just applying digitally.

    Good luck!
    This is not North Korea, or even India.

    Regardless of any letter written and sent, either by Royal Mail or Carrier Pigeon, the application for student support would be assessed by the same criteria as any other application: against the relevant legislation and statutory instruments. As it should be.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Point taken guys: if you elect to take the crooked politicians' bullying lying down, that is your prerogative, and your destiny. I don't!
 
 
 
Poll
Which party will you be voting for in the General Election 2017?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.