What to do afterwards?

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    I have just started a part time taught MA in history. I am 33, mum of 3 and have been a stay at home mum for 5+ years, and my career pretty much died 7 years ago when I had my first little boy.

    Since starting this process people have constantly asked what will be next and it's getting to me. It's a 2year course and I have daydreams about academic life but let's face it really it's highly competitive so I have to be realistic and have a plan B, c and D lol. I also don't know if I can even pass yet having been out of academia for over a decade.

    Is there anyone else in a similar position? I really have no clue and while I know I have a year at least before I need to have some idea, this does keep coming back to haunt me.

    I think my other options are:
    Market research (did 2years in attractions Mr and loved it but the technical bits are dull as dishwater!)
    Childcare/education - due to my boys I need a job that will work around my kids so need to be on an academic timetable.
    Of course there's always phd but I would like to actually earn some money at some point if only to give my poor hubby a bit of a break!! L
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    This is really something you need to think about based on what you enjoy and your circumstances. For a realistic shot at academia you need to do a PhD but financially that may not be viable for 3-4 years. Maybe consider doing it part time and working part time? If I were you I'd work for a bit after the masters and get yourself back into the swing of managing a (young?) family and working and then consider the PhD.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    This is really something you need to think about based on what you enjoy and your circumstances. For a realistic shot at academia you need to do a PhD but financially that may not be viable for 3-4 years. Maybe consider doing it part time and working part time? If I were you I'd work for a bit after the masters and get yourself back into the swing of managing a (young?) family and working and then consider the PhD.
    Thanks for your reply. Yes, my family is young. My eldest will be 7 in a few days and my youngest is 3 and due to start school next September, hence my ability to take on the MA as he now gets his funded hours. I would be reliant on funding either from a grant or a postgraduate loan which would see me massively indebted to the government but would get me the opportunity to gain qualifications. My main concern is obviously my boys but having spent the past few years 'a lady of leisure' I would enjoy earning and helping the family pot. However with 3i am limited to school hours as otherwise childcare will wipe out earnings. I had hoped my MA would help this conundrum but currently I am more confused than ever!!
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    Most mums find they never really reach the same salary point they used to be at before having kids. The time out of employment significantly decreases your value in the labour market.

    A lot of back to work mums go into basic admin jobs or marketing. You could also look at flexible supermarket roles.
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    (Original post by Anthonyuk95)
    Most mums find they never really reach the same salary point they used to be at before having kids. The time out of employment significantly decreases your value in the labour market.

    A lot of back to work mums go into basic admin jobs or marketing. You could also look at flexible supermarket roles.
    While I appreciate the help, this is what i am resigned to but I feel like my family shouldn't hold back my ambition and aspirations. I have worked 'mum jobs' in call centres and as a night time receptionist at a leisure centre and it brought in money but it certainly didn't stretch me. This is why this is such a conundrum. I understand I am pretty low down the employment ladder but still need to push as that's just who I am. The MA may open doors but equally the answer of 'oh, well I will just go and be a dinner lady' doesn't sit well with most anyone except my hubby and myself lol. Just wondered if anyone else was in a similar position and maybe had a career plan they would like to share.
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    (Original post by aimlou83)
    I have just started a part time taught MA in history. I am 33, mum of 3 and have been a stay at home mum for 5+ years, and my career pretty much died 7 years ago when I had my first little boy.

    Since starting this process people have constantly asked what will be next and it's getting to me. It's a 2year course and I have daydreams about academic life but let's face it really it's highly competitive so I have to be realistic and have a plan B, c and D lol. I also don't know if I can even pass yet having been out of academia for over a decade.

    Is there anyone else in a similar position? I really have no clue and while I know I have a year at least before I need to have some idea, this does keep coming back to haunt me.

    I think my other options are:
    Market research (did 2years in attractions Mr and loved it but the technical bits are dull as dishwater!)
    Childcare/education - due to my boys I need a job that will work around my kids so need to be on an academic timetable.
    Of course there's always phd but I would like to actually earn some money at some point if only to give my poor hubby a bit of a break!! L
    I can't think of many jobs outside of a school that are term time only. Even teaching can require you to be at school some evenings and come in early. My Mum is a teacher, she used childcare as have all the other Mums shes worked with and there were always times when our holidays weren't exactly the same.
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    (Original post by aimlou83)
    I have just started a part time taught MA in history. I am 33, mum of 3 and have been a stay at home mum for 5+ years, and my career pretty much died 7 years ago when I had my first little boy.

    Since starting this process people have constantly asked what will be next and it's getting to me. It's a 2year course and I have daydreams about academic life but let's face it really it's highly competitive so I have to be realistic and have a plan B, c and D lol. I also don't know if I can even pass yet having been out of academia for over a decade.

    Is there anyone else in a similar position? I really have no clue and while I know I have a year at least before I need to have some idea, this does keep coming back to haunt me.

    I think my other options are:
    Market research (did 2years in attractions Mr and loved it but the technical bits are dull as dishwater!)
    Childcare/education - due to my boys I need a job that will work around my kids so need to be on an academic timetable.
    Of course there's always phd but I would like to actually earn some money at some point if only to give my poor hubby a bit of a break!! L
    You're essentially talking about being a working mother, which isn't exactly a peculiar or special situation. Perhaps somewhere like Mumsnet might be better able to help with the practicalities? Plenty of people do it, so there must be a pool of experience there you can draw from.

    As for a PhD, that's not a cure-all. My PhD contract gave me five weeks holiday a year and there is now a standard employment-style formal leave booking and authorisation system. Once you're past undergrad level and studying full-time, you're on a normal working timetable. Having said that, if you could land a funded PhD, that would give you around £15k a year which would help with the household bills.

    After a PhD, full-time academics certainly don't get university holidays as leave. That's the time when they concentrate on the funding/grant-generating research which sustains their place in the department. Although as a post-doc, you're the lowest member of the faculty and you'll have to pay your dues before getting a long contract. You'll hop from short contract to short contract, probably having to move around the country chasing the opportunities. I'm not sure your view of 'the academic life' is entirely up with current events.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    You're essentially talking about being a working mother, which isn't exactly a peculiar or special situation. Perhaps somewhere like Mumsnet might be better able to help with the practicalities? Plenty of people do it, so there must be a pool of experience there you can draw from.

    As for a PhD, that's not a cure-all. My PhD contract gave me five weeks holiday a year and there is now a standard employment-style formal leave booking and authorisation system. Once you're past undergrad level and studying full-time, you're on a normal working timetable. Having said that, if you could land a funded PhD, that would give you around £15k a year which would help with the household bills.

    After a PhD, full-time academics certainly don't get university holidays as leave. That's the time when they concentrate on the funding/grant-generating research which sustains their place in the department. Although as a post-doc, you're the lowest member of the faculty and you'll have to pay your dues before getting a long contract. You'll hop from short contract to short contract, probably having to move around the country chasing the opportunities. I'm not sure your view of 'the academic life' is entirely up with current events.
    Thank you for your reply. Maybe so. I suppose I am asking a very generic question. I think the issue I have will be that of 'over qualification'. I wonder about doing a PhD even part time but I worry that will leave me even less employable. My alternative route is to go back 100% and retrain in childcare and work in a preschool or school. But...... Then why (apart from selfish bucket list type reasons) am I doing this degree and wasting 2years?

    Thanks everyone for taking the time to reply.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I can't think of many jobs outside of a school that are term time only. Even teaching can require you to be at school some evenings and come in early. My Mum is a teacher, she used childcare as have all the other Mums shes worked with and there were always times when our holidays weren't exactly the same.
    I wouldn't become a teacher. My husband just quit the profession due to stress and lack of balance. He is now a bus driver. Much much better
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    (Original post by aimlou83)
    But...... Then why (apart from selfish bucket list type reasons) am I doing this degree and wasting 2years?
    It's absolutely fine to study for the sheer joy and intellectual challenge of it. It doesn't have to directly lead to anything. Don't let the preconceptions of others, cloud your enjoyment of your course. There are plenty of working options when you're ready and your course will get your brain in gear and develop your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving skills. Just enjoy your Masters for what it is. I don't see how it's either selfish or a waste of time. It's certainly nobody else's business.
 
 
 
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