Will I Be Able to Handle French Distance Learning Fast-Track A-Level?

Announcements Posted on
How helpful is our apprenticeship zone? Have your say with our short survey 02-12-2016
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello! My question is about distance learning, how hard it is to do so for French, and how I can keep my level of French up.

    Since always, I've been a dedicated French learner. However, after moving schools (to a much better grammar school sixth form), I discovered I couldn't fulfil my want of continuing French to A-Level. This might have been for the better: the French class at my 6th form is a massive 20 students. Still, after I discovered that the majority of universities don't let students do a year abroad in Europe - or even do Language SSCs! - unless they have a qualification (preferably A-Level) in that language, I feel like I have to take things into my own hands if I want to continue into fluency.

    Although, I only just missed the A* at GCSE French, I'm taking Chemistry, Biology, History and EngLit for A-Levels - which are pretty serious subjects that require dedication.

    I've always wanted to grow my fluency by going to France for my year abroad - I'd rather go to a completely different uni than do a course without a year abroad (I want to do medicine).

    As a result, I've done a lot of research into distance learning, online courses, out-of-school tuition, fluency tests and evening classes. My question is, due to the intensity of my A-Level subjects, should I get a (preferably UCAS-recognised) qualification while I'm just out of GCSE French or wait until I potentially drop one? Should I get a tutor or could I do learn well with it just online? Would it be more realistic if I did a Short Course/AS Level rather than a 2-year A-Level, and if so which is better? Maybe I should fast-track over summer holidays? Do I simply get a tutor and see if I can raise my fluency, without getting a certificate, and hope I can prove that I can speak French well enough?

    Are there any people who have done either an A-Level language (whether in school or otherwise) or a Distance Learning/Fast Track course (whether French or otherwise) who could help?

    Thanks,
    Sharon

    P.S - My main aim here is to keep my French levels up, and going to another country/doing classes on-campus are the most foreseeable ways of doing it. I want to be as able as possible to prove to the uni that I am able to do this, and an A in GCSE French isn't enough.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by siggystardust)
    Hello! My question is about distance learning, how hard it is to do so for French, and how I can keep my level of French up.

    Since always, I've been a dedicated French learner. However, after moving schools (to a much better grammar school sixth form), I discovered I couldn't fulfil my want of continuing French to A-Level. This might have been for the better: the French class at my 6th form is a massive 20 students. Still, after I discovered that the majority of universities don't let students do a year abroad in Europe - or even do Language SSCs! - unless they have a qualification (preferably A-Level) in that language, I feel like I have to take things into my own hands if I want to continue into fluency.

    Although, I only just missed the A* at GCSE French, I'm taking Chemistry, Biology, History and EngLit for A-Levels - which are pretty serious subjects that require dedication.

    I've always wanted to grow my fluency by going to France for my year abroad - I'd rather go to a completely different uni than do a course without a year abroad (I want to do medicine).

    As a result, I've done a lot of research into distance learning, online courses, out-of-school tuition, fluency tests and evening classes. My question is, due to the intensity of my A-Level subjects, should I get a (preferably UCAS-recognised) qualification while I'm just out of GCSE French or wait until I potentially drop one? Should I get a tutor or could I do learn well with it just online? Would it be more realistic if I did a Short Course/AS Level rather than a 2-year A-Level, and if so which is better? Maybe I should fast-track over summer holidays? Do I simply get a tutor and see if I can raise my fluency, without getting a certificate, and hope I can prove that I can speak French well enough?

    Are there any people who have done either an A-Level language (whether in school or otherwise) or a Distance Learning/Fast Track course (whether French or otherwise) who could help?

    Thanks,
    Sharon

    P.S - My main aim here is to keep my French levels up, and going to another country/doing classes on-campus are the most foreseeable ways of doing it. I want to be as able as possible to prove to the uni that I am able to do this, and an A in GCSE French isn't enough.
    If your current A-Levels depend on what you want to do in the future then to be honest you shouldn't take French A-Level. The reason is whilst doing your current A-Levels and French you might run into the chance of missing out on grades because you might have focused on one too much than the other.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oxidation)
    If your current A-Levels depend on what you want to do in the future then to be honest you shouldn't take French A-Level. The reason is whilst doing your current A-Levels and French you might run into the chance of missing out on grades because you might have focused on one too much than the other.
    You make a good point, an A-Level would be way too intense. Still, an oral tutor, Cambridge short-course or a simple AS level might be survivable alternatives... Which one is the real question.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by siggystardust)
    You make a good point, an A-Level would be way too intense. Still, an oral tutor, Cambridge short-course or a simple AS level might be survivable alternatives... Which one is the real question.
    Yeah, that's possible just remembe your the one who will have to put in more work. It shouldn't be too hard at AS so it is possible at this level.
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: October 12, 2016
TSR Support Team
Today on TSR
Poll
Would you rather have...?
Useful resources
Study resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.