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    im worried. i think i have learnt from my mistakes while taking my gcses. are they as important as people (mostly teachers) say? what if you perform well in as/a levels? does that count for anything? are they just needed for uni or are very important in finding a good job?
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    of course you need them!
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    (Original post by & i'м so glaмoяous. ♥)
    im worried. i think i have learnt from my mistakes while taking my gcses. are they as important as people (mostly teachers) say? what if you perform well in as/a levels? does that count for anything? are they just needed for uni or are very important in finding a good job?
    GCSEs aren't THAT imprtant. You need them to get into college and in some cases, you'll need maths and english to get into uni. Obviously, A-levels overpower them, so a uni would be very likely to forgive a D in biology, if you have an A grade at A-level in biology for example.
    I needed 5 GCSEs to get into college, and I had to have maths and english. I think I needed maths and english for my uni offer aswell.
    Make sure you get yer maths 'n' english-at grade C at least. My mate failed GCSE maths, and they made him do it again at college (although he didn't have to do key skills, so he was a bit chuffed actually).

    You need goodish GCSEs if you're going straight from school into a job though.
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    Depends on your university choices, e.g. where and what course. Oxbridge? GCSEs are important. Medicine, Law etc? GCSEs important. If you want to study basketweaving at, say, a no. 50 university, then not so much.
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    For a solid chance of a "good" career, yes they are.
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    I'm not disputing the fact that GCSEs are important...but a friend (well, I say friend, more aquaintance) got all A* at GCSE and As in Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Chem and Econ at A level and got turned down by Imperial and Cambridge and a few other good universities (I think he wanted to study Economics or something). It just goes to show that you really need that something extra...this guy was boring as hell, no personality and just...wasn't easy to talk to. He also was the classic 'nerd' type in that he spent all his day with his computer but had next to no people skills. I know he is a rather extreme example, but I think that, while GCSEs are important, a few slip ups can be covered with good A levels and a 'good' personality. No idea what 'good' means, but another friend got a few As and a B at GCSE and still got into the Oxford economics and management course and she's pretty fun to talk to and can hold a conversation...so it's not the end of the world if you messed up an exam or two.
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    (Original post by clasigirlcs)
    I'm not disputing the fact that GCSEs are important...but a friend (well, I say friend, more aquaintance) got all A* at GCSE and As in Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Chem and Econ at A level and got turned down by Imperial and Cambridge and a few other good universities (I think he wanted to study Economics or something). It just goes to show that you really need that something extra...this guy was boring as hell, no personality and just...wasn't easy to talk to. He also was the classic 'nerd' type in that he spent all his day with his computer but had next to no people skills. I know he is a rather extreme example, but I think that, while GCSEs are important, a few slip ups can be covered with good A levels and a 'good' personality. No idea what 'good' means, but another friend got a few As and a B at GCSE and still got into the Oxford economics and management course and she's pretty fun to talk to and can hold a conversation...so it's not the end of the world if you messed up an exam or two.
    really?

    Imperial don't do Economics btw, but by the looks of it, this guy wouldve been their ideal student!

    TBH i just think this is a freak example. I'm not sure about the personality thing, since most uni's don't interview, and with Oxbrdige interviews they want to see how smart you are, not if you have a good personality.

    Alot of people are getting straight A's at A level, therefore GCSE's have become more important to differentiate people, especially for the top uni's (e.g. for LSE Economics you need at least 6A*'s and no more than 1 B to even be considered.
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    Ooops, it may have been LSE. I'm not sure (sorry, friends are going all over the place, can't keep track)...but the girl who got the few As and a B got into the oxford economics and management course and the LSE plain economics course (and she is taking the LSE place) but the guy who got all A* and all A def got turned down by 'good' universities. As I said, I'm not saying that GCSEs are pointless and that they don't matter, but if you're faced with two people who applied for a course at, say cambridge, both with all A* and all A, but one of them, you know, took an interest in say drama or music and can actually communicate well, whereas the other one is lacking (or not displaying) personality...I'd have thought the former would have got the place. But then again cambridge may as well put ONLY PEOPLE WITH ALL A* ARE ALLOWED TO APPLY cos seriously, most of the people I know (well, who took science courses anyways - I want to take natural science) got all A*. With the notable except of Neha who got the 2 A and B, but she applied to oxford anyways.
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    (Original post by clasigirlcs)
    I'm not disputing the fact that GCSEs are important...but a friend (well, I say friend, more aquaintance) got all A* at GCSE and As in Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Chem and Econ at A level and got turned down by Imperial and Cambridge and a few other good universities (I think he wanted to study Economics or something). It just goes to show that you really need that something extra...this guy was boring as hell, no personality and just...wasn't easy to talk to. He also was the classic 'nerd' type in that he spent all his day with his computer but had next to no people skills. I know he is a rather extreme example, but I think that, while GCSEs are important, a few slip ups can be covered with good A levels and a 'good' personality. No idea what 'good' means, but another friend got a few As and a B at GCSE and still got into the Oxford economics and management course and she's pretty fun to talk to and can hold a conversation...so it's not the end of the world if you messed up an exam or two.
    I have a friend just like this. He got 12 A*s at GCSE, he's doing 5 A levels (and I have no doubt he will get AAAAA) but he is the most untalkative and uninteresting person you can possibly imagine.

    We meet regularly, my inner circle of friends of whom he is a member, and on the night (which lasts maybe 4-5 hours on a saturday, every week) and during that period he (seriously) only says "hello" and later "goodbye"... But he's a good guy, if untalkative, which is why we like him.

    However, we have (slight) worries about his chances getting into a top flight University... If he gets an interview god knows what will happen; in general if you ask him a question that can possibly be responded with a nod or a one liner followed by a nod, he'll do it... And as for personal statements, other than the fact he's a hard working son of a ***** at school he doesn't really have much to talk about.
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    Nah, they're not as important as is being made out on this thread. But then, nor are A-Levels or degrees.
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    (Original post by Vesta)
    Depends on your university choices, e.g. where and what course. Oxbridge? GCSEs are important. Medicine, Law etc? GCSEs important. If you want to study basketweaving at, say, a no. 50 university, then not so much.
    Bullcrap :p:

    (Original post by calcium878)
    For a solid chance of a "good" career, yes they are.
    more bullcrap :p:
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    (Original post by clasigirlcs)
    Ooops, it may have been LSE. I'm not sure (sorry, friends are going all over the place, can't keep track)...but the girl who got the few As and a B got into the oxford economics and management course and the LSE plain economics course (and she is taking the LSE place) but the guy who got all A* and all A def got turned down by 'good' universities. As I said, I'm not saying that GCSEs are pointless and that they don't matter, but if you're faced with two people who applied for a course at, say cambridge, both with all A* and all A, but one of them, you know, took an interest in say drama or music and can actually communicate well, whereas the other one is lacking (or not displaying) personality...I'd have thought the former would have got the place. But then again cambridge may as well put ONLY PEOPLE WITH ALL A* ARE ALLOWED TO APPLY cos seriously, most of the people I know (well, who took science courses anyways - I want to take natural science) got all A*. With the notable except of Neha who got the 2 A and B, but she applied to oxford anyways.
    Well he mustve either got a terrible reference and written a really bad personal statement or he may have just been really unlucky.

    As for the girl who got accepeted, it seems very strange considering she has hardly any A*'s at GCSE. Did she go to a very bad school? Because i know that LSE do place a great emphasis on GCSE's, especially for straight Economics since the competition is so fierce for domestic students. You sure it wasnt for a combined honours course?

    You are right to some extent, but its more about how intelligent you are. I mean that is why you are going to Cambridge - to study, not to socialise.

    I think natural sciences is one of the easier courses to get into. My friend missed his offer by 2 grades but they still accepted him.
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    (Original post by ba_ba1)
    Because i know that LSE do place a great emphasis on GCSE's, especially for straight Economics since the competition is so fierce for domestic students..
    Yep, LSE are notorious for offering on pure grading....They should introduce some sort of standards for offers really.
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    (Original post by samba)
    Bullcrap :p:



    more bullcrap :p:
    Uh, excuse me? On the Oxford/Cambridge website it says they rarely interview people with less than 5 A*s at GCSE.

    If you look at the GCSE requirements for some courses, they're higher than for others. A top 10 university may not accept you for medicine with 10 As at GCSE, but maybe if you applied for Sociology or Politics or something they'd consider you.

    Next time you decide to 'bullcrap' an argument you should back it up with some evidence or an explanation in the very least. :rolleyes:
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    It depends what you want to do. For universities they're quite important, especially when considering the top universities as they give points for them such as 1.0 for an A* and 0.6 for an A at Oxbridge (not exact figures lol).

    GCSEs will show your competence in subjects that you haven't chosen to study further. So for instance, you should have a GCSE in English. If you plan on going into Computer Science at uni, you're probably a lot less likely to be taking A-Level English, so it shows how good you are at subjects you're not interested in that might be important to your further courses or career paths.

    A lot of colleges, sixth forms and so forth want you to get a minimum set of grades as well, but they're generally around 5 A*-C or something.

    They don't mean as much as A-Levels for universities though, even the top universities. the short story above about a straight A*/A student not getting into university is probably because they don't have anything else to show other than their grades. Most universities are just as interested in what you do in your spare time, any activities you participate in related to your course and getting to know the person you are as they are in your grades. My sister for example didn't do quite as well as she could have with her courses at A-Level, especially in the first year, but because she's done work experience in her area, she's attended loads of air shows, spoke to the PM over the a380 and so forth, they can see she's interested in Engineering.

    If you don't plan on going into further/higher education, then they're obviously going to be quite important because they're pretty much the only qualifications you've got. But again, if you get a grade U in History and you're going into a retail job, just don't put it down on your application form. The same can go for colleges, but I think universities have access to your grades, so there's not much you can hide from them.

    Really though, as long as you get a grade (A*-G), it's a pass. And you can work it up from there. You could even take re-sits or study the subject again to understand it more.

    If you don't do as you wanted, it's not the end of the world
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    (Original post by ba_ba1)
    Well he mustve either got a terrible reference and written a really bad personal statement or he may have just been really unlucky.

    As for the girl who got accepeted, it seems very strange considering she has hardly any A*'s at GCSE. Did she go to a very bad school? Because i know that LSE do place a great emphasis on GCSE's, especially for straight Economics since the competition is so fierce for domestic students. You sure it wasnt for a combined honours course?

    You are right to some extent, but its more about how intelligent you are. I mean that is why you are going to Cambridge - to study, not to socialise.

    I think natural sciences is one of the easier courses to get into. My friend missed his offer by 2 grades but they still accepted him.
    The girl who got accepted, she got 1 B (in art, god only knows why she took it though), and an A in RS and an A in English Lit...but she got A* in triple science, history, the other english, maths, etc...so she got 8 A*.

    And I never meant that Oxbridge or Imperial or wherever want to see whether you'll win the social butterfly of the year award or whatever, I'm just saying that if there's an interview and you sell yourself well, you can make up for a few stupid mistakes. I'm going to st pauls girls school for sixth form, about 90 girls applied (both in the october test and the march (well, around march anyways) test and 17 got in. I made a fair few errors on the entrance exams, but I think my interviews went well and I think that interviewing well made up for some of the errors on the test. Now, I know that obviously it would be different for university, more people wanting a place etc...but all I was trying to say to the question 'are GCSEs important' that yes, they are, but if you work hard at AS and A2 and, you know, generally interview well, then that could make up for a few slip ups, for instance, getting an A in French and English Lit (which I'm scared I will) if you're applying for a science course, but still getting A* in the rest of your GCSEs.
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    Uh, excuse me? On the Oxford/Cambridge website it says they rarely interview people with less than 5 A*s at GCSE.
    um, no, i don't think so.

    Straight from cam website:

    Matriculation requirements

    These are the minimum entrance requirements for all applicants regardless of course and age, and are designed to ensure you have had a sufficiently broad general education.

    Qualifications are required in:

    * English
    * a language other than English
    * an approved mathematical or scientific subject
    * two other approved subjects.

    For applicants with GCSEs and GCE A levels, at least two of these subjects must be at GCE A level and the others at GCSE (grades A, B or C).

    If there are good reasons why you expect not to be able to satisfy the matriculation requirements, for example if you have not taken a language other than English at GCSE, you should consult the Admissions Tutor of your preferred College, to find out if they would be able to waive any part of the requirement in your individual circumstances.

    However, you should note that most applicants will be expecting to achieve high grades in three or four subjects at GCE A level or equivalent.
    voila. no mention of any A*s, except you need 3 As minimum for alevels just chill everyone, if you do 'badly' in gcses but get As for alevels that proves that you've been 'improving', no? although yes, that doesn't happen in all cases...
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    (Original post by calcium878)
    For a solid chance of a "good" career, yes they are.
    ^o) Explain?

    I can't see how . Once you've started AS, GCSEs become insignificant.
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    this helped alot but kinda confused me lol
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    I think what the people who are saying 'gcse's are important' (and I'm one of those people) is that although if you do mess up a few GCSEs then a good interview, good A levels, and a generally 'nice' UCAS might be able to make up for it. However, if you look at the track record of people who have gotten into Oxbridge, Imperial etc. a lot of them will have gotten all/nearly all A* at GCSE and all As at AS. Therefore, you have very much improved your chances of getting into a 'top university' if you do have very good GCSE results. Not saying that it's impossible to get in otherwise, just that the track record of recent years suggest that most people who get into a top uni will have all A* and all A.
 
 
 

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