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FP1 Complex numbers (argument) query Watch

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    Should I express the argument of a complex number in radians or degrees? My teacher said it should always be in radians but a past exam question refers to the answer in degrees.
    Many thanks.
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    (Original post by Youngey4)
    Should I express the argument of a complex number in radians or degrees? My teacher said it should always be in radians but a past exam question refers to the answer in degrees.
    Many thanks.
    usually radians, unless the question says degrees lol

    just read the question
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    (Original post by dnr_23)
    usually radians, unless the question says degrees lol

    just read the question
    Ok thanks. The question I was doing didn't specify and it said give A0 for radians
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    (Original post by Youngey4)
    Ok thanks. The question I was doing didn't specify and it said give A0 for radians
    oh i seee thats so bad of them not to specify?!
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    (Original post by Youngey4)
    Ok thanks. The question I was doing didn't specify and it said give A0 for radians
    Post a picture of the question please. That's so sad, people could lose marks.
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    (Original post by Youngey4)
    Should I express the argument of a complex number in radians or degrees? My teacher said it should always be in radians but a past exam question refers to the answer in degrees.
    Many thanks.
    It really doesn't matter.

    The definition of the argument of a complex number is given in radians and most text books and sources concerning complex numbers will use radians. However, degrees can be used in most simple situations too.

    Most questions I have written and have seen in exam papers specify whether or not to give your answer in degrees or radians - and I think it would be quite harsh if they didn't and then didn't award full marks for correct answers in either degrees or radians (as it would be like accepting an answer in cm but not m!).

    For security, I'd say to give your answer in radians but always read the question and check that it is not asking for an answer in degrees. These questions are not trying to 'catch you out' in any way, but that you are actually reading the question and not just applying a mechanistic technique on single sight of the word 'argument'.
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    (Original post by Youngey4)
    Should I express the argument of a complex number in radians or degrees? My teacher said it should always be in radians but a past exam question refers to the answer in degrees.
    Many thanks.
    You could always give it in both. Then the right answer is assured. The more diminished your headspace devoted to the "answer", the wiser you are (assuming you actually know what the answer is).
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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    It really doesn't matter.

    The definition of the argument of a complex number is given in radians and most text books and sources concerning complex numbers will use radians. However, degrees can be used in most simple situations too.

    Most questions I have written and have seen in exam papers specify whether or not to give your answer in degrees or radians - and I think it would be quite harsh if they didn't and then didn't award full marks for correct answers in either degrees or radians (as it would be like accepting an answer in cm but not m!).

    For security, I'd say to give your answer in radians but always read the question and check that it is not asking for an answer in degrees. These questions are not trying to 'catch you out' in any way, but that you are actually reading the question and not just applying a mechanistic technique on single sight of the word 'argument'.
    Oh wow, my man done some sexy analysis on the argument.
    A* English kicking in.
 
 
 
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