Newly qualified and registered nurses wanted to create resources for job applicants!

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    I'm currently in the process of creating a series of resources for nurses applying for their first post as a qualified nurse. As part of this, it would be really useful to have short testimonials from nurses in posts to raise awareness of different areas applicants might like to consider when looking at jobs. These will be posted on the TSR wiki.

    Please comment here or send me a PM if you would be willing to write a small summary (around 300-500 words, or more if you'd like!) about how you became interested in your area of nursing, why you have chosen that position, the process of applying, and any other info you think people might find interesting/useful about your experiences. You don't need to have been in your post for a long time to contribute.

    If that's something you would like to be involved in then I'd really appreciate it, and it would mean you have contributed to a really useful resource that will be hopefully used by lots of applicants.

    There is no pressure to do this immediately, but it would be great if you could let me know if you intend to write something
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    I'm currently in the process of creating a series of resources for nurses applying for their first post as a qualified nurse. As part of this, it would be really useful to have short testimonials from nurses in posts to raise awareness of different areas applicants might like to consider when looking at jobs. These will be posted on the TSR wiki.

    Please comment here or send me a PM if you would be willing to write a small summary (around 300-500 words, or more if you'd like!) about how you became interested in your area of nursing, why you have chosen that position, the process of applying, and any other info you think people might find interesting/useful about your experiences. You don't need to have been in your post for a long time to contribute.

    If that's something you would like to be involved in then I'd really appreciate it, and it would mean you have contributed to a really useful resource that will be hopefully used by lots of applicants.

    There is no pressure to do this immediately, but it would be great if you could let me know if you intend to write something
    Perhaps not quite what you're after but I thought I would talk about a couple of areas i worked and try to big them up.
    My route in to them was a little unorthodox so I won't go in to that too much. But what I would say, is that job applications are now very much points based. Download the person specification and find the desirable and essential skills section. Tailor your statement to hit as many points on these lists as possible. If you don't have something like mentorship, talk about how keen you are to work with students and how you would aim to complete this as soon as you were able.

    Acute stroke
    I must admit that this was not my first choice of job and I ended up in it because of certain circumstances, but I soon grew to enjoy it immensely.
    Stroke gave me such a strong start to my career and really built upon the fundamentals of nursing and interdisciplinary team working. You're heavily involved with physios, OTs, speech therapists and i learned so many valuable techniques from them that I still apply to this day. You really learn how to build patients up again and help them regain their independence.
    Stroke can often have a poor reputation. Yes, it is hard work, but I have so many cases where I have seen amazing progression from my patients, e.g. from having dense weakness to being able to walk with a frame etc. It is truly a speciality where you can come in after a few days off and barely recognise your patient because they have improved so much. You also learn to celebrate the milestones. Being upgraded from fluids only to puree diet and seeing patients starting to eat again, you really learn to appreciate the small things.
    In terms of practical skills there was ample opportunities to place NG tubes, to care for PEGs, we were trained to do basic swallow assessments. In my trust we thrombolysed patients so there were many opportunities to progress to being a specialist nurse in thrombolyasis and triage and manage patients on their initial presentation to hospital.

    Oncology
    Again, another speciality that is often misunderstood. We hear cancer and think its always devastatingly sad. I don't know what it is about oncology, but in my experience it tends to attract the bubbliest, happiest nurses, who mean that it is an enjoyable place to work. Patients often have long stays or frequent readmissions, and so you really get to build some amazing nurse-patient relationships.
    It certainly isn't always sunshine and roses. But I feel it is also a great honour to support patients, and their families, at the end of their lives. Good palliative care is essential and is often overlooked as a vital role within healthcare. There is a lot of fulfilment in supporting someone to have a peaceful death and helping them and their families to come to terms with it.
    For the practical side oncology is also very hands on. Long lines, drains, different methods of feeding... there are lots of skills to be learnt. If you're in the area long enough you can learn to administer chemotherapy, or become a specialist nurse and help patients through their cancer journeys.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    Perhaps not quite what you're after but I thought I would talk about a couple of areas i worked and try to big them up.
    My route in to them was a little unorthodox so I won't go in to that too much. But what I would say, is that job applications are now very much points based. Download the person specification and find the desirable and essential skills section. Tailor your statement to hit as many points on these lists as possible. If you don't have something like mentorship, talk about how keen you are to work with students and how you would aim to complete this as soon as you were able.

    Acute stroke
    I must admit that this was not my first choice of job and I ended up in it because of certain circumstances, but I soon grew to enjoy it immensely.
    Stroke gave me such a strong start to my career and really built upon the fundamentals of nursing and interdisciplinary team working. You're heavily involved with physios, OTs, speech therapists and i learned so many valuable techniques from them that I still apply to this day. You really learn how to build patients up again and help them regain their independence.
    Stroke can often have a poor reputation. Yes, it is hard work, but I have so many cases where I have seen amazing progression from my patients, e.g. from having dense weakness to being able to walk with a frame etc. It is truly a speciality where you can come in after a few days off and barely recognise your patient because they have improved so much. You also learn to celebrate the milestones. Being upgraded from fluids only to puree diet and seeing patients starting to eat again, you really learn to appreciate the small things.
    In terms of practical skills there was ample opportunities to place NG tubes, to care for PEGs, we were trained to do basic swallow assessments. In my trust we thrombolysed patients so there were many opportunities to progress to being a specialist nurse in thrombolyasis and triage and manage patients on their initial presentation to hospital.

    Oncology
    Again, another speciality that is often misunderstood. We hear cancer and think its always devastatingly sad. I don't know what it is about oncology, but in my experience it tends to attract the bubbliest, happiest nurses, who mean that it is an enjoyable place to work. Patients often have long stays or frequent readmissions, and so you really get to build some amazing nurse-patient relationships.
    It certainly isn't always sunshine and roses. But I feel it is also a great honour to support patients, and their families, at the end of their lives. Good palliative care is essential and is often overlooked as a vital role within healthcare. There is a lot of fulfilment in supporting someone to have a peaceful death and helping them and their families to come to terms with it.
    For the practical side oncology is also very hands on. Long lines, drains, different methods of feeding... there are lots of skills to be learnt. If you're in the area long enough you can learn to administer chemotherapy, or become a specialist nurse and help patients through their cancer journeys.
    This is brilliant, thanks so much for taking the time to do this! :awesome:

    I'm literally just writing a bit about statements now so will add that info in too. *
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    I'm going through the interview process right now (first one on weds 😬). Send me a message next week and I'll write you a summary of my experience if that would be helpful?!

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    (Original post by ltaylor1987)
    I'm going through the interview process right now (first one on weds 😬). Send me a message next week and I'll write you a summary of my experience if that would be helpful?!

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    Yes, that would be great thanks, will do
 
 
 
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