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    Although it's expensive, you might wanna get TVB if you haven't yet done so.
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    (Original post by teaspoon)
    I suggest watching a lot of Chinese films, programmes, soaps
    yep, i'd suggest so... u pick up so much more that way than just learning from books and teachers etc... well, thats what i think anyway. (im bilingual, u see... and i can honestly say, i learnt to fluent standard-in one dialect at least- just by picking things up) Speaking wise is relatively straight forward compared to writing and reading!-there's like LOADS of characters to learn...As for the tones, yeh!! they are important: a different tone can mean something entirely different but i can assure u, it becomes second nature after a while!

    only go to school if ur willing to learn... and be warned, it takes YEARS to even get to reasonable standard(!)

    You all think mandarin is easier to learn than cantonese? I wudav sed the other way round! lol but that's just my opinion!

    Good luck with it!
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    (Original post by *skye*)
    You all think mandarin is easier to learn than cantonese? I wudav sed the other way round! lol but that's just my opinion!
    I think for people who haven't been brought up speaking chinese....learning how to pronounce the words correctly in cantonese would be a lot harder than learning how to speak in mandarin.

    G
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    gal lay guy sic chow fan

    ahh, the wonders of working in a chinese restaurant...
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    (Original post by *skye*)
    You all think mandarin is easier to learn than cantonese? I wudav sed the other way round! lol but that's just my opinion!

    Cantonese is def. more difficult to learn than Mandarin! Afterall, Mandarin has only the four tones, whereas Cantonese has 7-9 of them - i often have difficulty listening to Mandarin speakers speak Cantonese because the tones are always muddled. And then not to mention the non-standard characters that Cantonese people use, which always confuzzle Mandarin speakers to no end!

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    Mandarin is much more useful.
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    I myself can speak both of them. :rolleyes:
    Mandarin is formal and traditional, spoken by 1.3 billions people. Cantonese is informal and only used in Hongkong and Guangdong province(we have 34 provinces in total!) And you can check the newspapers in Hongkong, they use Mandarin(but written in the traditional way,not like mainland).
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    (Original post by gringalet)
    gal lay guy sic chow fan

    ahh, the wonders of working in a chinese restaurant...
    is that curry?.............fried rice?lol am probably wrong!
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    (Original post by shellebell)
    is that curry?.............fried rice?lol am probably wrong!
    I'm reading it as "chicken curry eats fried rice" lol...
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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    I myself can speak both of them. :rolleyes:
    Mandarin is formal and traditional, spoken by 1.3 billions people. Cantonese is informal and only used in Hongkong and Guangdong province(we have 34 provinces in total!) And you can check the newspapers in Hongkong, they use Mandarin(but written in the traditional way,not like mainland).
    It's also spoken in Guangxi Province, and when i was in Guilin and Fujian, most people could speak it there too (albeit in a some form of dialect variant...). Canto can also be heard spoken in Malaysia and Singapore, although Mandarin is more prevalent.
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    (Original post by mongoose)
    I'm reading it as "chicken curry eats fried rice" lol...
    yup, that's the literal translation; of course, it means "chicken curry with fried rice".
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    (Original post by gringalet)
    yup, that's the literal translation; of course, it means "chicken curry with fried rice".
    "Chicken curry with fried rice" would simply be "gahlay gai chow-faan", not "gal lay guy sic chow fan" as you wrote - 'sic' meaning 'to eat'.

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    no i think he is right about the "Eat" fried rice
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    (Original post by teaspoon)
    I suggest watching a lot of Chinese films, programmes, soaps
    yeah i agree, my mum thinks the reason why me and my sister are much better at cantonese than my much older bro's is cos we had chinese tapes to watch, and it was therefore easier to pick up speaking and listening, and wasn't as boring when being taken to chinese school. Since getting TVB, the Chinese subtitles also help with learning new words (although sometimes spoken is different to how the word is read..., confusing huh?).
    I suppose there are books out there with cassettes which help, cos i know my older brother bought one, and made the effort to learn more cantonese. Alternatively you could try VCD/chinese movies which is even better!
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    Speaking of the traditional and simplified chinese writing, I've been taught the traditional way, and if I see simplified I don't know the word, or find it very difficult...so I think the invention of it wasn't such a good idea...although i do understand that it was meant to be easier to learn. So do chinese school teach the simplified versions nowadays?
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    Speaking of the traditional and simplified chinese writing, I've been taught the traditional way, and if I see simplified I don't know the word, or find it very difficult...so I think the invention of it wasn't such a good idea...although i do understand that it was meant to be easier to learn. So do chinese school teach the simplified versions nowadays?

    I think it depends on the school. I had Taiwanese teachers, so we were taught to write using the traditional characters... The simplified script looks uglier, and just confuses everything!
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    i work in a chinese restaurant, and that's what i've been taught. she said to me, "it literally means eat, but obviously it translates as 'with'". perhaps that's just their special thing – i don't know. sorry for making an effort.

    and i'm a she
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    (Original post by mongoose)
    "Chicken curry with fried rice" would simply be "gahlay gai chow-faan", not "gal lay guy sic chow fan" as you wrote - 'sic' meaning 'to eat'.

    yep.. thats right
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    (Original post by gringalet)
    i work in a chinese restaurant, and that's what i've been taught. she said to me, "it literally means eat, but obviously it translates as 'with'". perhaps that's just their special thing – i don't know. sorry for making an effort.

    and i'm a she
    lol... i've noticed that every family kinda have their "own" rules with grammar and word order and stuff... so dont worry about it As long as u get the gist, ur fine!
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    (Original post by gringalet)
    i work in a chinese restaurant, and that's what i've been taught. she said to me, "it literally means eat, but obviously it translates as 'with'". perhaps that's just their special thing – i don't know. sorry for making an effort.

    and i'm a she

    Perhaps it's a new trendy way of speaking or something :confused: My spoken Cantonese is really out-dated, the last time i was in Hongkong people said i spoke like an old person!

    Are you sure that's what they said? 'Cos "with" would be 'lau' (high-level), bta, the sentence doesn't sound right with that (or in fact any) preposition between the two nouns, word order conveys all the information needed.
 
 
 

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