Grade 8/9 in Spanish

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    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
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    (Original post by glassanimal)
    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
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    (Original post by glassanimal)
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    (Original post by glassanimal)
    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
    I think your teacher is exaggerating the difficulty. Looking at last years results statistics for Edexcel, thousands of GCSE candidates were awarded A* grades and I'm sure this was mirrored by other GCSE examiners. I have difficulty believing they were all native Spanish speakers. The changes for the new specification may have made it harder but there will still be similar proportions of top grades awarded.


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    (Original post by glassanimal)
    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
    No.
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    (Original post by glassanimal)
    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
    I got an A* in Spanish last year, equivalent to a grade 8/9, and I'm not a native speaker. It's very manageable if you put in the effort.
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    (Original post by glassanimal)
    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
    well thanks for boosting my self esteem.
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    I got an A* in Spanish last year, equivalent to a grade 8/9, and I'm not a native speaker. It's very manageable if you put in the effort.
    could you give me some tips as it how you revised. for each sections pls.
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    (Original post by bhavyab02)
    could you give me some tips as it how you revised. for each sections pls.
    I did iGCSE on the old course, so it might be different.

    I revised on the Oral section the most, where I had to prepare around 40 answers to questions they would ask in the exam. You could wing it, but it's safer to learn the answers that the teacher had checked over and corrected for any little mistakes in the lessons before the exams. To remember the answers, I imagined me doing what I was actually saying in Spanish, for example "fue a Francia con mis amigos" I imagined going to France with my friends (common sense really but it worked best lol). I don't actually know if you have this type of oral exam anymore, but I'm sure that this type of learning will come in helpful in at least some part of GCSE Spanish We also had slots with a Spanish conversation teacher who was fluent, and they often helped us revise some specialist tenses and vocab to use when we had to analyse a picture card in the exam.

    For Listening and Reading, the best study/revision method by far is just past papers (especially for Listening). For these two, you need to recognise how to get the answers they are looking for, and therefore get the most marks possible. Doing past papers gets you used to the type of questions that come up, and what to write as an example. I struggled with listening the most throughout GCSE languages, but the general thing to do is to listen to key words that give you the answer and the words that they said around this key word (just incase they negated the action, for example they said "I never play football" when the question is "do they like football" but you say that they like it because you heard the word "football". They do this A LOT in listening exams, but it's only usually at A-A* questions). Reading is similar, do past papers to see which questions come up a lot. I also recommend learning vocab words on websites such as Memrise, where you can find vocab relative to GCSE Spanish. Just one word you don't understand can mess up an answer, sometimes worth 3+ marks. Learning vocab is important in all of the modules you will sit, so it's a very important part of revision!!

    Writing is just practise really, learn grammar rules, tenses, some fancy sentences you can slot in, and you are fine. If you still get dictionaries in exams like we did, you can look for some vocab words there, but don't waste too much time doing this. The more Spanish you do, the more confident you will get.

    Unfortunately I can't give you the best revision advise as I didn't revise that much out of revision lessons at school, which were orchestrated by the teacher, who usually uses different techniques to what is manageable at home. If you get a good enough teacher, they will help you revise and give you tips as well, so don't worry too much if my advice isnt very helpful
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    I did iGCSE on the old course, so it might be different.

    I revised on the Oral section the most, where I had to prepare around 40 answers to questions they would ask in the exam. You could wing it, but it's safer to learn the answers that the teacher had checked over and corrected for any little mistakes in the lessons before the exams. To remember the answers, I imagined me doing what I was actually saying in Spanish, for example "fue a Francia con mis amigos" I imagined going to France with my friends (common sense really but it worked best lol). I don't actually know if you have this type of oral exam anymore, but I'm sure that this type of learning will come in helpful in at least some part of GCSE Spanish We also had slots with a Spanish conversation teacher who was fluent, and they often helped us revise some specialist tenses and vocab to use when we had to analyse a picture card in the exam.

    For Listening and Reading, the best study/revision method by far is just past papers (especially for Listening). For these two, you need to recognise how to get the answers they are looking for, and therefore get the most marks possible. Doing past papers gets you used to the type of questions that come up, and what to write as an example. I struggled with listening the most throughout GCSE languages, but the general thing to do is to listen to key words that give you the answer and the words that they said around this key word (just incase they negated the action, for example they said "I never play football" when the question is "do they like football" but you say that they like it because you heard the word "football". They do this A LOT in listening exams, but it's only usually at A-A* questions). Reading is similar, do past papers to see which questions come up a lot. I also recommend learning vocab words on websites such as Memrise, where you can find vocab relative to GCSE Spanish. Just one word you don't understand can mess up an answer, sometimes worth 3+ marks. Learning vocab is important in all of the modules you will sit, so it's a very important part of revision!!

    Writing is just practise really, learn grammar rules, tenses, some fancy sentences you can slot in, and you are fine. If you still get dictionaries in exams like we did, you can look for some vocab words there, but don't waste too much time doing this. The more Spanish you do, the more confident you will get.

    Unfortunately I can't give you the best revision advise as I didn't revise that much out of revision lessons at school, which were orchestrated by the teacher, who usually uses different techniques to what is manageable at home. If you get a good enough teacher, they will help you revise and give you tips as well, so don't worry too much if my advice isnt very helpful
    thank you so much this was a lot of help to me! you have some great tips. i will try to follow you if i can. LOL
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    (Original post by glassanimal)
    My spanish teacher has told my gcse class that grade 8/9 is vertually unatainable to non native speakers and the best in the class will probably only get a 7- is she true (there are lots of very clever people in my spanish class alot of them are doing 13+ gcses)
    Definitely think they're exaggerating there. Maybe they are trying to motivate you to revise?

    You've all ready gotten some great advice off of george_c00per, so I'm going to leave you some resources that I used that might help you too (I got an A* at GCSE using these - currently still using them at A-level )

    http://www.memrise.com/home/
    https://quizlet.com/ - I'd really recommend either this or the one above for vocab learning. You can try them both out and see which you prefer.

    https://www.duolingo.com/ - Great for practising.

    http://www.elmundo.es/ - This is a Spanish news website. I know it might seem really daunting as there's probably a lot of words on there that you won't understand, but if you try and translate a few bits from there (not a whole article, just a few sentences) you'll be able to pick up some new vocab and get to grips on grammar and sentence structure.

    These Youtube channels are really good too:
    https://www.youtube.com/user/tontitofrito/playlists
    https://www.youtube.com/user/Butterf...hola/playlists
    https://www.youtube.com/user/gringoespanol/playlists


    Good luck!
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    I have to say that that is not true, at least for GCSE. For A Level, there was some controvesy about how high the grade boundaries were, meaning only native speakers got A*.
 
 
 
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