What impact did Truman have on US foreign policy 1945-46?

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anonymous472
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History homework
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Gingerbread101
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(Original post by anonymous472)
History homework
What ideas do you already have? We can't just give you the answers you could probably find this on Bitesize history too
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michael115414
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You're looking right at the beginning of the Cold War.
Previously under Republicans the US adopted Isolationism as their foreign policy (i.e. not get involved with world affairs). Their President Woodrow Wilson set up the League of Nations after WW1 but the US refused to enter as it didn't want anything to do with European problems (think geographically, America is far away - why should it get involved, but also in terms of power. Does a Superpower really want to intertwine itself so much in little Europe?).

All that changed under Truman. In an attempt to contain Communism (without violence which would trigger a nuclear war resulting in MAD), Truman went well out of his way to interfere in Europe. Remember, Europe crumbled after World War Two. Britain and France, two strong Capitalist countries, were also in an awful situation economically. Yeah we managed to create a NHS, but at a cost of rationing for an extended period of time etc. So, what Truman did to prevent these countries turning to Communism (like some of Eastern Europe was inclined to do under Stalin's sphere of influence) was he offered economic incentives or aid. I can't remember the exact figure but he offered Marshall Aid to many countries in Europe to help rebuild shattered economies - millions of dollars was invested. How did he get America to agree? All countries that signed up to Marshall Aid had to pay back the loans - but not necessarily with money. Cleverly, Truman set up trade links. And with trade links comes a competitive market. And with competitive markets you get Capitalism - therefore no enticement on Western Europe to turn Communist. That's a direct contrast to America's isolationist approach they had prior to Truman.

I've told you about Marshall Aid. You may want to read up on the Truman Doctrine (another part of foreign policy) which included the above on Marshall Aid.Good luck for your history homework.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by michael115414)
You're looking right at the beginning of the Cold War.
Previously under Republicans the US adopted Isolationism as their foreign policy (i.e. not get involved with world affairs). Their President Woodrow Wilson set up the League of Nations after WW1 but the US refused to enter as it didn't want anything to do with European problems (think geographically, America is far away - why should it get involved, but also in terms of power. Does a Superpower really want to intertwine itself so much in little Europe?).

All that changed under Truman. In an attempt to contain Communism (without violence which would trigger a nuclear war resulting in MAD), Truman went well out of his way to interfere in Europe. Remember, Europe crumbled after World War Two. Britain and France, two strong Capitalist countries, were also in an awful situation economically. Yeah we managed to create a NHS, but at a cost of rationing for an extended period of time etc. So, what Truman did to prevent these countries turning to Communism (like some of Eastern Europe was inclined to do under Stalin's sphere of influence) was he offered economic incentives or aid. I can't remember the exact figure but he offered Marshall Aid to many countries in Europe to help rebuild shattered economies - millions of dollars was invested. How did he get America to agree? All countries that signed up to Marshall Aid had to pay back the loans - but not necessarily with money. Cleverly, Truman set up trade links. And with trade links comes a competitive market. And with competitive markets you get Capitalism - therefore no enticement on Western Europe to turn Communist. That's a direct contrast to America's isolationist approach they had prior to Truman.

I've told you about Marshall Aid. You may want to read up on the Truman Doctrine (another part of foreign policy) which included the above on Marshall Aid.Good luck for your history homework.
Interesting, but the OP's question refers to 1945-46 and the Marshall Plan wasn't proposed until 1947 and wasn't delivered until 1948.
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michael115414
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
Interesting, but the OP's question refers to 1945-46 and the Marshall Plan wasn't proposed until 1947 and wasn't delivered until 1948.
Ooo my bad, I thought the Truman Doctrine was 1946. Thanks for the correction! Thank god I didn't make that mistake when I took the exam in June...
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by michael115414)
Ooo my bad, I thought the Truman Doctrine was 1946. Thanks for the correction! Thank god I didn't make that mistake when I took the exam in June...
Yes, a good job you didn't do that or much of what you wrote would have been ignored as irelevant! :eek:
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