Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Is anyone on here dyspraxic?

    I just wondered because I have severe dyspraxia, SID, tremor, hypotonia and and inverted legs. (yes...the list is a little long lol!).

    Basically it affects my co-ordination, spatial awareness, fine motor skills and sensory processing and my muscle tone (I am very *floppy*!).

    This means in exams I have to use a laptop and have 25% extra time (my writing is so slow!)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, im not but i know someone who is, hes a great guy!

    This means in exams I have to use a laptop and have 25% extra time (my writing is so slow!)
    As much as i would like that, i bet its annoying huh!
    Good luck with future exams
    Offline

    13
    I know someone who has dyspraxia. She got extra time in exams too... you should get extra help if you go off to uni. Dyslexic people get some benefits (extra tuition and in some cases a laptop!) so I'm sure that someone with dyspraxia would have a lot of support

    How do you feel about having dyspraxia? Obviously it makes every day tasks that many people take for granted a lot harder. Do you feel like you get enough support? Do you receive any sort of treatment?

    Nice to hear from you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm dyspraxic as well- not nearly as severe as it sounds like you are- but it does affect my life. My spatial awareness and sense of direction is so bad that I get lost almost on a daily basis.
    My mind doesn't work with any directional queues- if someone tells me something like go up NOT down, 2 minutes later I'll get confused about whether they said it WAS up or it WAS down. I had this so badly with the locks on my front door that I was constantly getting the keys jammed and we eventually had to replace the locks.
    My mum was also dyspraxic, and she became a teacher for children with dyslexia, dyspraxia and dyscalculia, and wrote many books about it, so she helped me a lot.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The thing about dyspraxia is that it is not nearly as widely recognised as dyslexia, so people don't always get enough support for it.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    OP, look at my sig for a link to the disabled students sub-forum ... you'll probably find fellow dyspraxics in there
    Offline

    13
    I'm mildly dyslexic. Gal - what books did your mum write? Sounds really interesting.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm mildly dyspraxic...it used to be called 'slow child syndrome' and that's a pretty good way to put it I think except that adults can have it too. When I was younger I was horribly shy and awkward, even around my family and friends. I wouldn't speak until I was about 6, so I was taught to read really early, so I used to pick anything up and just start reading

    I've improved in confidence...mostly from getting a weekend job, a really great group of friends in 6th form (and a boyfriend out of it!) haha. I'm still a bit of a loner though, and not very open with my emotions. Plus I'm still absolutely appalling at any sports involving coordination or balance. It hasn't stopped me completing my Duke of Edinburgh Gold award though I'm so proud haha!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    i am...i'm mild-to middle range. added to the fact i'm missing some bones in my ears so guess what my balance is like. lol.
    I never really got much support til i was in uni but i do find people don't really understand it and just think i have dyslexia or think its similiar to dyslexia when theyre totally unrelated. they just think im clumsy and can't grip things well and walk into walls and have messy hand writing etc.

    I have top say the biggest hurdle was my driving test which i took on auto cos i just couldnt manage to co-ordinate the changing of the gears without moving the car over. lol. and i still failed a few times cos i couldn't process the instructions quick enough and reacted too slowly.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I've done DofE aswell (bronze!) but it was quite a challenge. My legs gave in for the next 48hrs!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My mums name was Dorian Yeo (you probably got from the past tense that she's dead now). She taught maths to kids with learning difficulties even though by the time I was 13 I was better at maths than she was!

    She kind of pioneered ways to teach kids with learning disabilities and thats what her books were about. E.g a kid with a learning disabilities can find it virtually impossible to learn things like their times tables by rote, so she would teach them to understand multiplication, and she created a whole bunch of games to help the process. She became quite an expert in her field, although I couldn't actually read one of her books, they're long and all about methods of teaching with lots of templates for her games and stuff. I think some schools make their teachers read them though.
    Offline

    13
    Thank you gal. She sounds like she was a wonderful lady. An inspiration
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Indeed!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm mildly dyspraxic. I have never been officially diagnosed though. My mum's job is working with children with special needs, so she has been fantastic at helping me out. The same with my dyslexia too. I just hate that i'm labelled as clumsy by people and that no one has ever heard of dypraxia.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My younger brother is dyspraxic, he has real problems with co ordination sometimes, he also has mentally developed slightly late. But he is fantastic, he aspires to be able to fly a plane (he has used that many flight simulators, he would have a very good idea how to fly a real plane). His GCSEs just were a nightmare for him, and my heart went out to him. But I know that if I was in his shoes, I wouldn't have coped as well as him. He knows the stuff, its just writing it down. But he is still one of the best little chappy's I know!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not dyspraxic but I am dyslexic. That is totally different but I also get 25% time in exams as my writing speed is affected. My problem has nothing to do with muscles. Instead a different side of the brain (the right) is dominant instead of the left as in most people. This means literacy skills are affected and I also have problems with organisational skills and short term memory. It doesn't show too much unless I have a lot of complex studying to do, then it can get severe. It sucks. Anyway good luck.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks.

    Doesn't it just get annoying when you know you can do it but you just can't show it?!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by k9ruby)

    Yeah my sense of direction is pretty poor aswell (it took me 2 years to learn my way round school, I got lost in a holiday home and I still need somone with me if I go anywhere else but 50m away from where i live.

    ...

    Until I was around 7 noises used to drive me insane. I would cry none stop for 2hrs+

    I still cannot bear wool, lace, denim and clothes labels!
    I'm forever getting lost too. If I'm driving (I drive an automatic, but still struggle with spatial awareness/perception etc) I never know where I'm going until I get to the turning, however many times I've been there, by which time it is too late to get in lane, so I had to get a Tom Tom. Even when I'm walking, even if I can recognise the way in one direction, I'll get lost coming back - it just doesn't look the same the other way round!

    The noises thing really annoys me too, little things like cutlery being put down on a table will sound so painful for me, and moderately bright light gives me a headache. As for the fabrics, I couldn't stand wearing jumpers when I was younger so was the only one at school who didn't wear one. Sometimes it was compulsory, e.g. for concerts and school photos, so I just had to say I was allergic and even then it caused problems coz there were two options for jumpers, wool and acrylic so it was hard to say I was allergic to both - I was only assessed recently so I didn't know why it was! Clothes labels and seams still drive me crazy, and really tight clothes - it's not so bad now as it used to be, I used to dress in quite a tomboy-way coz I was more comfortable in looser clothes.

    One of the things that annoys me most though is concentration and memory - I can't follow films, I find it difficult to follow books (worrying as I am going to be doing a languages degree and already have a long reading list) and I got some nasty comments in A-level History for not being able to remember dates etc. Again, before I was assessed so I had no explanation! Plus I'm always losing things/forgetting to do things/not being sure whether I've done them.

    So yeah, it can be pretty damned frustrating - even moreso for me because I'm sure it's gotten a lot worse in the last couple of years so I remember what it was like NOT struggling with seemingly simple things! And people not understanding how it's possible to be relatively clever but find seemingly trivial things tricky.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm very mildly dyspraxic but my mum and my brother have it quite bad. One thing we share in common is poor spatial awareness like for example when I turn a corner I often misjudge it and hit my shoulder on the wall. I find I often just totally miss the ball in football. My handwriting is poor which I am told is because of poor muscle tone, my maths (and mental maths) is good though just got a B at A2 (should've got and A). I think its a really misunderstood condition and more should be done to make it more recognised rather than been labled an "oaf".
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah, strobe lights make me feel disorientated so when I go to the theater and watch anything and their used more than 5seconds or so I close my eyes and curl up to block it out.

    I hate tight things too.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: August 20, 2007
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.