My career plans no longer make sense?

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    As an AS-Level student of Maths, Physics, English Language and Theology, I've kept my options open between scientific and humanitarian university courses.

    About two years ago I drafted a plan of what I wanted to do after high school and that encompassed finishing college with a set of subjects that allow me to get an undergraduate Law degree, get an MSc in Corporate Law and then go on to pass the BPTC and become a barrister.

    My issue comes in at the fact that I seem to be enjoying the scientific side of things a lot more than I expected. I intended to do Maths because it would help with the number crunching in the corporate world and Physics because I enjoyed it, but I never considered doing either of these in university. Now, after having understood that one can pass the BPTC without having taken a Jurisprudence undergraduate course, I'm considering doing a different course in university in order to broaden my education.

    Approaching my question - I would like to know what section of law would be opened to me if I decided to take Physics or Maths in undergrad? Is there such a profession that combines the courtroom spotlight, thrilling rush with the nerdy, mathematical aspect of physics and maths? My plans seem to be crumbling because of my now continuously fueled passion for the sciences which is growing at the same rate as my passion for the humanities, and if they are equal by the time I have to apply to university the decision is going to be incredibly difficult.

    Thank you.
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    Any area of law is open to you with a science/maths degree. You are not limited in anyway.

    If you want to use your degree knowledge in a legal environment then the area of IP/ patents might be of particular interest to you if you do a science course and tax if you do maths. These areas tend to recruit more people from those backgrounds given the cross over. But you could have studied any degree subject and still potentially get into the majority of these areas.

    I'm not an expert in the bar route, so it could be slightly different if you want to be a barrister, but if you wanted to be a lawyer instead the above is based on my experiences of recruiting and working with those type of lawyers.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Any area of law is open to you with a science/maths degree. You are not limited in anyway.

    If you want to use your degree knowledge in a legal environment then the area of IP/ patents might be of particular interest to you if you do a science course and tax if you do maths. These areas tend to recruit more people from those backgrounds given the cross over. But you could have studied any degree subject and still potentially get into the majority of these areas.

    I'm not an expert in the bar route, so it could be slightly different if you want to be a barrister, but if you wanted to be a lawyer instead the above is based on my experiences of recruiting and working with those type of lawyers.

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    I understand that I wouldn't be limited, but would I be at a significant disadvantage? If an undergraduate course in Law isn't mandatory, then why do people actually take it as opposed to taking something that would help them further specialise?
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    (Original post by Hubrillity)
    I understand that I wouldn't be limited, but would I be at a significant disadvantage? If an undergraduate course in Law isn't mandatory, then why do people actually take it as opposed to taking something that would help them further specialise?
    Not from my experience. Only if you went into the area of patents do I think it has an distinct disadvantage not having an academic background that means you have an understanding of why that patent exists in the way it does.

    I've recruited lawyers for far too long. It really doesn't matter what you have studied. Some of the best (and successful) IP lawyers I know have studied subjects like History, Languages, Music, although there is obviously a significant proportion of law graduates and some Sciences grads in there too. Most of their knowledge is gained through on the job experience.

    People study law for their interest, some study it because they think it's the best way to get into a career in law. But other people choose non-law degrees for the same reasons, knowing that the GDL is available to gain the basic legal knowledge required.

    Most people don't know which area of law they want to specialise in. Some even struggle to define that after completing a training contract, let alone before they have even finished their education. Even those who think they do know often change their mind when seeing the work/realities in practice.

    Law firms and the Bar recruit a significant proportion of non-law applicants. The main thing is that you are intelligent and skilled enough to do the work when you are recruited, not that you have technical knowledge. The GDL and LPC/BPTC will give people some technical training to be able to apply to law, but most of the actual knowledge required comes with on the job experience rather than an undergraduate degree title.






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    Previous posters have already given good overviews of legal areas that benefit from a science degree. I'd like to throw in real estate / construction law, especially if you were into engineering. Banking & finance is also interesting for people with good quantitative skills.

    I did law as an undergrad (I'm not a UK lawyer so the GDL route was not available to me) but had I had the choice, I'd have done a different undergraduate degree. That's not because I did not enjoy my law degree (I enjoyed it at least as much as I enjoy legal practice now) but because like you, I was interested in vastly different subjects and would have very much loved to do a humanities degree first, had I known the legal route would be available to me later on. It allows you to explore more than one subject and also gives you greater flexibility if you ever decided legal pratice wasn't for you after all.

    Bear in mind, however, that doing an unrelated undergraduate degree and then a GDL will take more time (duh) and also be a lot more expensive. If you are comfortable that you'll achieve a very good honours classificiation in your undergraduate (I'm talking first class honours) then you may be able to secure sponsoring for the GDL and the LPC/BPTC (at least that's the case if you secure a training contract with a good law firm, I suspect it is substantially more difficult if you want to go down the barrister route, which is even more competitive). If the money is not an obstacle, then I'd recommend doing the GDL route given that your interests are this varied.

    I also found a very interesting article on Legal Cheek (I hope it is okay to post this here) that advocates for the GDL route (some of the comments are also interesting to read):

    http://www.legalcheek.com/lc-careers...sh-law-degree/
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    (Original post by Hubrillity)
    I understand that I wouldn't be limited, but would I be at a significant disadvantage? If an undergraduate course in Law isn't mandatory, then why do people actually take it as opposed to taking something that would help them further specialise?
    It's not an issue. As J-SP has already said, studying a science could give you an advantage in some spheres of legal practice.

    People study law (a) because they like the idea of studying it, (b) because they want to be a lawyer and have nothing else they'd rather study or (c) because they suffer from lack of imagination.

    Doing a law degree would cut a year or two from your route to qualification and be cheaper, but if you would really rather study something else then please don't be dissuaded from doing that because you think it will impact on your options for a legal career.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    It's not an issue. As J-SP has already said, studying a science could give you an advantage in some spheres of legal practice.

    People study law (a) because they like the idea of studying it, (b) because they want to be a lawyer and have nothing else they'd rather study or (c) because they suffer from lack of imagination.

    Doing a law degree would cut a year or two from your route to qualification and be cheaper, but if you would really rather study something else then please don't be dissuaded from doing that because you think it will impact on your options for a legal career.
    (d) they can't afford to pay for the GDL
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    (d) they can't afford to pay for the GDL
    A fair point which I never really considered, as I only looked at firms which funded it.
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    Doesn't make a difference. Study the subject at university you think you'll most enjoy (and therefore will be most likely to get a first in)

    Speaking as someone who secured a pupillage and funding for the BPTC (as well as training contracts..), if you want a pupillage the best thing to have by a country mile is a first class degree.
 
 
 
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