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I've been kicked off my course and I don't know what to do from here?

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    On thursday, I found out I'd been withdrawn from my course due to low attendance. The reason for this being my depression. It's impossible to get up some mornings and I have no motivation. All that aside, I felt hard done by, because there is a certain process they have to follow. There is a verbal warning, a meeting and then a formal meeting. I was given a verbal warning but no meeting. They had put me on a 2 week "trial" to monitor my progress. I had one day off during those 2 weeks, because I had left my wallet on the bus the day before and I had no money so I couldn't get the bus. Also, they say my behaviour has been inadequate, which I completely disagree with. I'm not just saying that because I am biased towards myself, but because I genuinely can't think of a single incident which could warrant me being removed from the course.

    Anyway, I have to write a letter of appeal to my college about why they have made the wrong descision to withdraw me. If that fails, I don't really know what to do from here. Could I please have some advice? Thank you
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    Are they aware you have depression? And are you getting any help for it?
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    (Original post by wen_but)
    On thursday, I found out I'd been withdrawn from my course due to low attendance. The reason for this being my depression. It's impossible to get up some mornings and I have no motivation. All that aside, I felt hard done by, because there is a certain process they have to follow. There is a verbal warning, a meeting and then a formal meeting. I was given a verbal warning but no meeting. They had put me on a 2 week "trial" to monitor my progress. I had one day off during those 2 weeks, because I had left my wallet on the bus the day before and I had no money so I couldn't get the bus. Also, they say my behaviour has been inadequate, which I completely disagree with. I'm not just saying that because I am biased towards myself, but because I genuinely can't think of a single incident which could warrant me being removed from the course.

    Anyway, I have to write a letter of appeal to my college about why they have made the wrong descision to withdraw me. If that fails, I don't really know what to do from here. Could I please have some advice? Thank you
    Go and see the welfare adviser or student support so they can help you with your appeal. You need to understand the rule and what you have to prove.

    Make sure you check in with your Dr and get them to write a supporting letter confirming the depression.

    They cant be expected to tic if you havent told them. It sounds like they do not know.
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    Write an appeal with the support of your doctor, perhaps if you are very unwell it might be worth either starting from scratch next September. Or, if you want to continue then make sure the college are supporting you more, they should have a well-being/support service you can access when you need it.

    If you haven't been to a doctor yet please book some time with your GP and start getting yourself on route to recovery.

    If you live with anyone ask them for help. You might not be able to motivate yourself but someone making sure you have something to eat and strongarming you to the bus stop might help you stay on your course until you are well enough to motivate yourself.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Are they aware you have depression? And are you getting any help for it?
    No they don't. And I did get help for it before my GCSE's. I've tried getting back in contact with my old counsellor but he has never gotten back to me.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Go and see the welfare adviser or student support so they can help you with your appeal. You need to understand the rule and what you have to prove.

    Make sure you check in with your Dr and get them to write a supporting letter confirming the depression.

    They cant be expected to tic if you havent told them. It sounds like they do not know.
    Thank you! They don't know, no
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    (Original post by Quilverine)
    Write an appeal with the support of your doctor, perhaps if you are very unwell it might be worth either starting from scratch next September. Or, if you want to continue then make sure the college are supporting you more, they should have a well-being/support service you can access when you need it.

    If you haven't been to a doctor yet please book some time with your GP and start getting yourself on route to recovery.

    If you live with anyone ask them for help. You might not be able to motivate yourself but someone making sure you have something to eat and strongarming you to the bus stop might help you stay on your course until you are well enough to motivate yourself.

    Good luck.
    Would I be allowed to start from scratch, as I'm 16 and I legally have to be in education
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    Now education is compulsory for post 16, there are only 3 reasons they can get rid of you:
    • You choose to go elsewhere
    • They permanently exclude you for your behaviour
    • You die
    They cannot just get rid of you for poor performance so if you haven't been permanently excluded then they cannot throw you out.
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    (Original post by wen_but)
    On thursday, I found out I'd been withdrawn from my course due to low attendance. The reason for this being my depression. It's impossible to get up some mornings and I have no motivation. All that aside, I felt hard done by, because there is a certain process they have to follow. There is a verbal warning, a meeting and then a formal meeting. I was given a verbal warning but no meeting. They had put me on a 2 week "trial" to monitor my progress. I had one day off during those 2 weeks, because I had left my wallet on the bus the day before and I had no money so I couldn't get the bus. Also, they say my behaviour has been inadequate, which I completely disagree with. I'm not just saying that because I am biased towards myself, but because I genuinely can't think of a single incident which could warrant me being removed from the course.

    Anyway, I have to write a letter of appeal to my college about why they have made the wrong descision to withdraw me. If that fails, I don't really know what to do from here. Could I please have some advice? Thank you
    If you have depression they should have been told, really. How are they supposed to know not to 'kick you out' based on your mental health if they are unaware?

    This is why schools/colleges have to be told these kind of things, so they can help you and make adjustments where necessary.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    Now education is compulsory for post 16, there are only 3 reasons they can get rid of you:
    • You choose to go elsewhere
    • They permanently exclude you for your behaviour
    • You die
    They cannot just get rid of you for poor performance so if you haven't been permanently excluded then they cannot throw you out.
    OP said they cited behaviour as a reason.
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    It's difficult to believe that they kicked you off the course on a whim. It just doesn't happen like that. As well as the poor attendance, what was the progress like - i.e. what were you getting in tests and assessed work?

    If you chose not to tell them about your depression, it is not really fair now to attempt to use it to retain access to a course you've been asked to leave. Had they known about it beforehand, they could have put in place some support structure etc and maybe you wouldn't have got to this point. Anyway, if you feel that you've been hard done by, then by all means appeal to whoever you need to at your college (ask for their policies about this), but I feel that there must be more to their asking you to leave the course than simple poor attendance.
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    (Original post by Compost)

    They cannot just get rid of you for poor performance
    They can. Schools and colleges are audited on student numbers and their funding relies on students actually rocking up for classes (this to avoid enrolment of 'phantom' students to bump up the ££) and they will exclude students aged 16+ who do not adhere to attendance rules. Students like this are also a problem to teach - they don't keep up, require remedial work, hold the rest of the class back and waste teacher time - numerous reasons for any school/college to want to 'get rid'. Whilst you do need to be in a job or in some form of education/training, it doesnt have to be at that school/college so they are totally within their rights to exclude you.

    If you have depression - get help for it. Go back to your GP and ask for help/counselling/drugs - whatever you need to help you function. And TELL the college - they will otherwise interpret your behaviours as the usual stupid teenage 'can't be arsed' attitude. And btw, don't use depression as an excuse. If you really dont want to be there, find something else to do.
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    (Original post by wen_but)
    No they don't.
    well then you are a fool.

    an organisation cannot be a reasonable adaptation if it is unware of the need for ther reasonable adaptation.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    Now education is compulsory for post 16, there are only 3 reasons they can get rid of you:
    • You choose to go elsewhere
    • They permanently exclude you for your behaviour
    • You die
    They cannot just get rid of you for poor performance so if you haven't been permanently excluded then they cannot throw you out.
    and the basis for this assertion ?

    while people are required to be in education, training or a job with training, unlike school aged children there is nothing that forces a particualr institution to retain someone who doesn;t attend and deceptive.
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    Surely the OP would have had to fill in a form on enrolment about health conditions/illnesses?
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    and the basis for this assertion ?

    while people are required to be in education, training or a job with training, unlike school aged children there is nothing that forces a particualr institution to retain someone who doesn;t attend and deceptive.
    This is an issue I've come across at my grandson's college. He is 17 and attends a local college where this year's OFSTED report has called it a failing college, and so it has been amalgamated with another college in the area.
    One of the major concerns focussed on the behaviour of the 16-18 year old students. Many of the students just do not want to be there because of the compulsory education/training rule, and their behaviour is reflected in this. They are disruptive and disrupt the learning of the other students.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    It's difficult to believe that they kicked you off the course on a whim. It just doesn't happen like that. As well as the poor attendance, what was the progress like - i.e. what were you getting in tests and assessed work?

    If you chose not to tell them about your depression, it is not really fair now to attempt to use it to retain access to a course you've been asked to leave. Had they known about it beforehand, they could have put in place some support structure etc and maybe you wouldn't have got to this point. Anyway, if you feel that you've been hard done by, then by all means appeal to whoever you need to at your college (ask for their policies about this), but I feel that there must be more to their asking you to leave the course than simple poor attendance.
    We haven't done any tests as of now but I was up to date on all my work. I wasn't behind or anything.
    I know, I didn't think it'd be relevant but looking back on it it was a bit of a stupid thing to do
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    (Original post by wen_but)
    No they don't. And I did get help for it before my GCSE's. I've tried getting back in contact with my old counsellor but he has never gotten back to me.
    How can they help you if they don't know? From their perspective, you're just a lazy student who doesn't wake up when the alarm clock goes off. I know this isn't the case but try see it from their eyes.

    (Original post by Seamus123)
    This is an issue I've come across at my grandson's college. He is 17 and attends a local college where this year's OFSTED report has called it a failing college, and so it has been amalgamated with another college in the area.
    One of the major concerns focussed on the behaviour of the 16-18 year old students. Many of the students just do not want to be there because of the compulsory education/training rule, and their behaviour is reflected in this. They are disruptive and disrupt the learning of the other students.
    This. Some kids are just not academic, fact. When I went to sixth form they used to have the EMA where students could get up to £30 a week for staying in school until 18 if you adhered to their contract (so much % attendance etc.) and the number of kids who stayed just for this was ridiculous. So much disruption for those who genuinely wanted to be there and learn.
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    (Original post by Tw1x)
    How can they help you if they don't know? From their perspective, you're just a lazy student who doesn't wake up when the alarm clock goes off. I know this isn't the case but try see it from their eyes.



    This. Some kids are just not academic, fact. When I went to sixth form they used to have the EMA where students could get up to £30 a week for staying in school until 18 if you adhered to their contract (so much % attendance etc.) and the number of kids who stayed just for this was ridiculous. So much disruption for those who genuinely wanted to be there and learn.
    EMA was classic Bread and Cricuses / encouraging dependencet on the Great Leader and the Dear leader ...

    although with Kim-il-Jez in charge labour will be harking back forthe days of the Dear Leader and the Great Leader , perhaps even for the days of the Gromet Leader
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    My older grandchildren got the EMA, and I agree there was a culture of just attending to get the money. My 17 year old grandson who is at college now had never been to school. I home educated him all through his school years. He was so looking forward to going to college to do IT, and he would come home and tell me about students swearing, spitting at tutors, throwing things around the classrooms.
    They had sniffer dogs there last week looking for students with drugs on them.
 
 
 
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