People say that I wheeze but I can't hear it

Announcements Posted on
How helpful is our apprenticeship zone? Have your say with our short survey 02-12-2016
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    I ran a race today (about 3 and half mile) and a woman who was running just in front of me looked and said 'are you ok' I said yes she said 'you are wheezing a lot' I said 'oh I don't know why but I am knackered' and she laughed a bit. I overtook her later on but at the end I heard her talking to someone saying 'there was a girl right behind me wheezing loads and I was just like omg' I think maybe I annoyed her. The thing is other people have said the same thing when I'm running hard they say I wheeze and a few years ago I've been asked if I have asthma. I don't as far as I know and I feel fine in races just obviously out of breath. I am no good at that peak flow meter though I had a go during a nursing course I did and got something like 250 which apparently is asthmatic. I am only 5ft in height though. I do have nasal problems/rhinitis/polyps but have never had trouble breathing through my airways. My dad has asthma.

    Should I be concerned. I can't hear myself wheezing I can just hear myself breathing heavy when running and I feel ok.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    No, you shouldn't be worried, just because you can't hear it. I can't always hear my wheeze (I'm asthmatic)
    If you're concerned though, you should go to your doctor and explain the situation.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I ran a race today (about 3 and half mile) and a woman who was running just in front of me looked and said 'are you ok' I said yes she said 'you are wheezing a lot' I said 'oh I don't know why but I am knackered' and she laughed a bit. I overtook her later on but at the end I heard her talking to someone saying 'there was a girl right behind me wheezing loads and I was just like omg' I think maybe I annoyed her. The thing is other people have said the same thing when I'm running hard they say I wheeze and a few years ago I've been asked if I have asthma. I don't as far as I know and I feel fine in races just obviously out of breath. I am no good at that peak flow meter though I had a go during a nursing course I did and got something like 250 which apparently is asthmatic. I am only 5ft in height though. I do have nasal problems/rhinitis/polyps but have never had trouble breathing through my airways. My dad has asthma.

    Should I be concerned. I can't hear myself wheezing I can just hear myself breathing heavy when running and I feel ok.
    Considering your family history and other possible signs you have mentioned i'd go talk to your doctor about the possibility of asthma or simmilar conditions.
    Don't worry yourself too much though. You feel fine and are able to be active so it's obviously not terribly serious whatever it may be (if anything).
    Since you already know you have nasal issues it could just be that and you have become too used to any slight wheezing to notice it.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It could be asthma. Or it could just be upper airway noise. Nasal polyps are associated with asthma too so it is a little complicated. Still it's worth having the work up and I would advise you see your gp for this. Peak flow is something you mentioned however a one off reading is unhelpful, we need several readings throughout the day +/- a trial of ventolin to see if there is reversibility. Are you at all symptomatic with it? Any history of eczema or hay fever?
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Sean3000)
    It could be asthma. Or it could just be upper airway noise. Nasal polyps are associated with asthma too so it is a little complicated. Still it's worth having the work up and I would advise you see your gp for this. Peak flow is something you mentioned however a one off reading is unhelpful, we need several readings throughout the day +/- a trial of ventolin to see if there is reversibility. Are you at all symptomatic with it? Any history of eczema or hay fever?
    I've tried peak flow several times I even bought a meter several years ago and I've never been able to get past 300 lol. I've never had eczema or hay fever but I have had some kind of nasal/allergic condition for 7 years which I've seen the gp/consultant for on and off and had a variety of tests for. It started with rhinitis symptoms then I gradually got a blocked nose which got worse and worse. I remember it was that blocked I couldn't swallow in a classroom without my nose making a noise and people looking (sorry if it's disgusting). I was referred to an ear nose throat consultant who said I had nasal polyps and told me to take nasal drops and a nasal spray indefinately.

    The drops and spray helped a little but I've found that taking half an antihistamine everyday alongside the spray really helps. If I can control the rhinitis reaction then this will prevent the polyps. I've had both skin and blood allergy tests though for hay fever/dogs/dust etc and they were all negative. I've never worked out what causes my rhitis/runny/inflamed nose everyday despite eliminating products I use etc but if I don't treat it I end up with nasal polyps due to the constant rhinitis/inflammation. It is a bit like having hay fever everyday. I'm assuming that because antihistamines help it must be an allergy of some sort though...

    Despite this though my airways have always felt fine I run 5 times a week and do very intense interval sessions with no apparent problems.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Do you have follow up with the ENT surgeons? As the problem is still active then it might be worth seeing them again as they can offer further treatment, this could be switching you to a different steroid spray consider a course of oral steroids or, if the problem remains refractory, consideration of surgery. If you still have your peak flow keep a diary of readings, particularly morning and evening readings to look for diurnal variation that may be consistent with airway disease. A trial of ventolin could also be an option to see if you're peak flow comes up with this. The other thing your gp could do would be to consider formal spirometry tests. It sounds like the polpys are probably the culprit but as I said they are associated with asthma too so in the context of "wheeze" symptoms may well need to be excluded as a cause of symptoms in its own right. I hope you get it sorted out.
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: October 24, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Today on TSR
Poll
Would you rather have...?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.