Will avaerage life expectancy (UK) ever reach 100 ???

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    Will the average life expectancy ever reach 100 ( UK) ???
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    (Original post by anonomon)
    Will the average life expectancy ever reach 100 ( UK) ???
    I personally don't believe so, which is based on 2 reasons:

    - there is a fair percentage of people who die young/middle aged - obviously this brings down the average number (while still being negatively skewed) at around 80.
    - researchers are finding evidence that suspects that the 'limit' of age is around 120 years (which a very minute percentage reach). I'm not a biologist, but i believe it's to do with the amount of times cells can grow and replace older ones.

    Both of these factors would mean that the average life expectancy could never really go above 90 (in my opinion).
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    Of course, it will. But it will take a very very long time, with advancement in medicine and science, then anything is impossible.
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    Ever is such a long time that I would have said it's almost a certainty.

    Of course by then it might not be called the UK, but hey ho.
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    (Original post by KnowledgeIsBest)
    Of course, it will. But it will take a very very long time, with advancement in medicine and science, then anything is possible.
    I suppose that's one side of the coin. There is nothing biologically impossible about human beings becoming regenerative. That there is nothing special that happens in a womb that cannot be replicated outside it - nothing within a human body that cannot be created anew or refreshed.

    I suppose that opens up the question of whether our society will ever reach such a stage of technological and scientific advancement. There's no sign that controlling ageing in that sort of way is seriously on the horizon. So it's really a question of time: will we continue to advance as we have (or even as rapidly as we have) in recent times?

    There's plenty of reasons to assume that we won't. We can be pretty destructive, we can fall back to superstition and against science, we can let moral qualms (rightly or wrongly) set back scientific progress. There's still a good deal of Luddism in modern society as well as ridiculous nostalgia: could we actively hold ourselves back? Or even reach a stage of development where people are relatively content and don't have the innovative spark that has seen us through the last century.
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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2...scientists-cl/


    Humans unlikely to ever live longer than 125 years, scientists claim.
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    I think that if you know the cause of something then there is no reason you can't fix it.500 years ago nobody would have thought you could eliminate a disease like smallpox yet we have done so.I think we could do.Except there is no will to tackle ageing.Its just viewed as a normal part of life.But if you viewed it as more of a disease then maybe there would be more attempts to beat it.Ageing is not this mythical inevitable thing. If you understand how a process works then you can do something about it and reverse that process in theory.
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    In terms of mostly natural methods then Japan leads the way at 86 years for women and that's still increasing by about 1 year every 3 years so technically speaking it is on course to do so sometime this century. Indeed, although humans have a genetic ceiling above ~110, the number of people reaching 100 is still increasing relatively rapidly.

    By the end of this century though it may become commonplace to hit 100 on the basis that cloning and medicine in general to keep you alive are developing at a swift rate. The biggest impact though will come when designer babies become more common, these children will have 'bad' genes disabled before birth.

    I'd also add that nutrition plays some part.
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    (Original post by anonomon)
    Will the average life expectancy ever reach 100 ( UK) ???
    Yes.




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    For women yes, for men possibly but it will take at least 100 yrs longer.
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    (Original post by caravaggio2)
    For women yes, for men possibly but it will take at least 100 yrs longer.
    What is your basis for the second assumption?
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    What is your basis for the second assumption?
    Just a guess Dherol
    Based on the fact that the gender life expectancy gap (you know....the one gap that most feminists never want to talk about) at the turn of the last century was one year. Women lived one year longer on average.
    In the following 100 years that gap widened to the point where men ( depending on where you live) died on average 7 years ealier than women.
    In recent years the gap has started to close slightly but that may have something to do with the economic downturn. When we stop building things, fewer men fall off them or get crushed to death by them in the process.
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    (Original post by caravaggio2)
    Just a guess Dherol
    Based on the fact that the gender life expectancy gap (you know....the one gap that most feminists never want to talk about) at the turn of the last century was one year. Women lived one year longer on average.
    In the following 100 years that gap widened to the point where men ( depending on where you live) died on average 7 years ealier than women.
    In recent years the gap has started to close slightly but that may have something to do with the economic downturn. When we stop building things, fewer men fall off them or get crushed to death by them in the process.
    I'd be curious to know the average life expectancy for a woman in the UK 100 years ago vs that of a man today.
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    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    The prospect of living till 100 in the UK sounds like hell.
    It will be the end of the welfare state.
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    Yes, but first the population will fall fairly dramatically, and life expectancy will also fall, for a few generations (NWO)
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    (Original post by Foo.mp3)
    Yes, but first the population will fall fairly dramatically, and life expectancy will also fall, for a few generations (NWO)
    Current immigration and fertility levels according to the ONS will have us around 110 million by 2110.

    We'll have overtaken Japan and Russia.
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    (Original post by leadheadsmith)
    I personally don't believe so, which is based on 2 reasons:

    - there is a fair percentage of people who die young/middle aged - obviously this brings down the average number (while still being negatively skewed) at around 80.
    - researchers are finding evidence that suspects that the 'limit' of age is around 120 years (which a very minute percentage reach). I'm not a biologist, but i believe it's to do with the amount of times cells can grow and replace older ones.

    Both of these factors would mean that the average life expectancy could never really go above 90 (in my opinion).
    I think you're talking about telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes.

    A hundred years ago, nobody would have conceived of the average life expectancey being in the eighties. Hell when I was a kid the average life expectancy was less than today, and the average "old person" was in their mid-sixties - and we're only talking twenty years ago.

    Researchers and scientists always turn out to be wrong when further evidence is found or what they've found is reviewed again. I can well imagine there being some telomere restorative drg available in my lifetime, and the average life expectancy being ~150 by the end of the century.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Current immigration and fertility levels according to the ONS will have us around 110 million by 2110
    You've omitted three very important variables:

    1) Lifestyle linked mortality e.g. cancer and neurogenederative diseases (dementia/Alzheimers etc) associated with chronic EMF exposure and diabetes-linked problems (metabolic/cardiovascular diseases)

    2) Increasing inequality and a reduced need for labour, thanks to automation, the unchecked emergence of monopolies, and associated rent seeking and enhanced transnational extraction (money leaving the country, corporatist tax bill minimisation) ~ public finances and domestic demand hollowed out, welfare decimated, pensions become unsustainable (probably blame Brexit)

    3) Deep government will start war when it suits, to try to create/maintain order out of chaos, for the elites they serve (Rothschilds et al. usually do rather nicely out of conflict), save any socialist revolution displacing the puppets and demanding that the shady characters who really run the show relinquish the reins and surrender their hoards
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    telomerase is the key to reversing human age. Basically telomeres are at the edge of your chromosomes, every cell division, a small part of it is eliminated (because of polymerase etc..) and the more you telomeres get short, the more the gene expression changes and becomes less efficient. This is why you get old with the numerous physiological changes on your body.
    However, telomerase is an enzyme capable of reversing this process and growing back telomeres (just like lobsters do). But the problem is that the gene for telomerase is not active in our body. If we find a way to activate this gene, we would probably don't get old and it would be the key to curing many diseases related to ageing such as alzheimers, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, arthritis, and many more. So yes I believe one day people will live more than 100 years.


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    maybe....in the future
 
 
 
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