Lying on CV?

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    I'm currently looking for a part-time job, my first paid job in retail, and have been for the last 2 years. I have at least three different voluntary roles on it, and my CV is a lot better than most I've seen, so I'm pretty sure at this point that the problem is a lack of paid experience. I'm now trying to get a job for the Xmas period again, and I'm considering putting down that I've done a few months paid work in a (made-up) cash-and-carry just to help my chances, with a friend as a reference. Has anyone tried this, and if so, were you or were you not caught out on it? I'm not particularly proud of the fact that I'm needing to make up some experience, but at this stage, after 2 years and having been urged by so many others to just make something up, I'm getting desperate and genuinely considering it just to finally get my foot in the door.

    I'm wanting actual facts on it rather than just hyperbolic speculating based on what someone's read online or been told by their careers advisor, etc. so please only respond if you've done this at some point or know someone who did, and with whether you/they got caught out on it or didn't.

    Thanks!
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    Do not lie on your CV, it will screw you over at some point sooner or later
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    (Original post by Dancatpro)
    Do not lie on your CV, it will screw you over at some point sooner or later
    That's obviously the default reaction on places like here, but I've heard of tons of people - and had tons try to persuade me - to make relatively small stuff like this up on it. I can see it being a problem for an actual career, lying about degrees and things like that, but for some experience with an entry-level part-time job? Clearly there are tons of people doing it, which is why I'm asking - on a factual basis, without hyperbole or scare-mongering - how likely you are to actually get caught out for doing so.

    On that note, please only reply if you've done this at some point or been in a similar situation, or known anyone who has.
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    (Original post by The_Architect)
    That's obviously the default reaction on places like here, but I've heard of tons of people - and had tons try to persuade me - to make relatively small stuff like this up on it. I can see it being a problem for an actual career, lying about degrees and things like that, but for some experience with an entry-level part-time job? Clearly there are tons of people doing it, which is why I'm asking how likely it is to get caught for doing so.
    If they ask for a reference for that job and you cannot provide one or you provide a ******** one ... then you're screwed.

    And then your reputation as an applicant employee with be tarnished and may spread to other companies.

    Not worth the risk in my opinion.

    I sat through a lecture today which included this discussion point (careers sub module at uni), and it's very clear to me that you should never risk it.
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    (Original post by Dancatpro)
    If they ask for a reference for that job and you cannot provide one or you provide a ******** one ... then you're screwed.
    Sorry, I should have mentioned - a friend has offered to be my reference for it.

    I sat through a lecture today which included this discussion point (careers sub module at uni), and it's very clear to me that you should never risk it.
    Yeah, I was afraid of that. It goes without saying that unis, teachers, careers advisors, etc. are going to advise against it, this is why I really don't want answers from people who have just read or heard something, but those have actually done this at some point or at the very least know someone who has, it grounds answers in fact rather than just speculation i.e. what someone was told by their lecturer one day.
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    (Original post by The_Architect)
    Sorry, I should have mentioned - a friend has offered to be my reference for it.



    Yeah, I was afraid of that. It goes without saying that unis, teachers, careers advisors, etc. are going to advise against it, this is why I really don't want answers from people who have just read or heard something, but those have actually done this at some point or at the very least know someone who has, it grounds answers in fact rather than just speculation i.e. what someone was told by their lecturer one day.
    So .... you want advice about whether or not to lie on a CV from people who have lied on their CV's?

    Seems very biased.

    Regardless, whatever you choose I wish you the best of luck
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    So you only want to hear from people who have also lied and cheated?

    'Tons of people' aren't doing this. If you've not managed to get a job in 2 years then the lack of paid work is almost certainly not what's holding you back. How old are you btw? What qualifications do you have?

    People spin their CVs and make things sound grander than they are, sure, but outright lying is stupid. So is anyone saying you should do it.
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    (Original post by Dancatpro)
    So .... you want advice about whether or not to lie on a CV from people who have lied on their CV's?

    Seems very biased.

    Regardless, whatever you choose I wish you the best of luck
    I'm not really wanting advice at all, cause I can predict how that'll go on a place as studious as this, where everyone has at some point had it drilled into them by someone that making up stuff is a big no-no, so is obviously going to be biased that way. For that reason, I'm wanting actual results/facts, whether those who have done it got caught doing it or didn't, or people's friends who did it got caught doing it or didn't. Also, I'd like to know just how common it is or isn't for entry-level part-time jobs, which I suppose could be answered by anyone that has an idea of that, but again, I'm still wanting actual facts rather than just speculation.

    And thank you, I appreciate it.
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    I think you're not really grasping the fact that lying entirely about a job you never had at a company that doesn't exist is not 'lying about a small thing.' Lying about a small thing on your CV is like if you exaggerate the role you played in a project that you were still part of, not lying about that project entirely. Literally no one does this - I'm not sure where you heard that tons of people were doing it lol.

    I don't know anything about the hiring process so I can't really specify, but if you have been in paid work there will be tax records of it - it's not just references that employers can use. I'd suggest thinking more carefully about why you haven't got a paid role in the first place, that will help you much more in the long run.
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    There's a lot more to this that you haven't considered.

    1) I'm guessing you're at uni? So whats your plan if they call your friend for a reference whilst you're in the middle of a class?

    2) It's all well and good saying you've had a paid job...but employers will (And rightly so) ask for a P45. Proof of earnings from your last job so they can see your tax codes. If you say you've lost it they'll either ask you to apply for another one or make you fill out a P60 which you'll have to highlight your made up job on it..
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    You will be The_Architect of your own downfall.

    Oh, and...
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    It does not matter whether the experience is paid or not, if you have experience then you have experience. If it is voluntary/unpaid they even look on it more favourably as they will see that you have a genuine interest in working rather than just a monetary incentive (even if that isn't actually true). Also, what if they ask you to carry out a role that you highlighted in your fake role but do not actually have enough experience of having done it? You may find yourself struggling which can see you out of a job pretty sharpish.
    Here is a pretty interesting article about lying on your CV about work experience from someone who works in HR - http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/.../#41611e617c3d

    "And even if false credentials get you the job, those untruths may come back to haunt you.
    "You're subject to immediate dismissal if it turns out you misrepresented something," says Nason. If your company is acquired, for instance, the acquirer's HR department may perform an audit of its new employees. Or your background may be checked when you apply for a promotion. Former Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson, former Notre Dame football coach George O'Leary and celebrity chef Robert Irvine are just three of the people who made news when false background information cost them high-profile jobs." - https://www.monster.com/career-advic...-lies-hot-jobs

    Some other good sources to look at would be:
    http://workplace.stackexchange.com/q...at-would-the-i
    http://www.monster.com/career-advice...on-your-resume

    It might sound appealing, but what about in the future when it costs you a job? If you have the experience and qualifications necessary then you're in with a strong chance without having to lie. You could always expand on the genuine experience you have in a covering letter which could give you a competitive advantage and not come back to haunt you.

    What happens if they search for information about the company and nothing comes up? Or they contact a company with the same name and they say you've never worked there? Lying about what tasks you carried out is one thing, but making up a company and a job role is huge. It makes the application fraudulent e.g they may pursue charges if they find out after they have hired you, blacklist your name, or fire you. There is no good outcome if they find out, they're not going to tell you off and say don't do that again. That's it, you're out and it can affect your application to future jobs even out with that company.

    Saying that, my mum *apparently* knows someone who has said they lied about a qualification to get into a job so eh. Your mileage may vary, although she did later go on and genuinely get that qualification. I definitely would not recommend it and the majority of people would also be the same. Sure, the chances of them finding out might be slim, however the consequences if they do find out can be huge. It may not just affect you in regards to that company but also future companies. Do not do it. If you need more experience on your CV then genuinely go out and get it, and it'll be a lot better for you.
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    I doubt that we'll convince you otherwise, but you'd be very unwise to not take on board some of the advice prescribed above.
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    (Original post by EmmaCx)
    It does not matter whether the experience is paid or not, if you have experience then you have experience. If it is voluntary/unpaid they even look on it more favourably as they will see that you have a genuine interest in working rather than just a monetary incentive (even if that isn't actually true). Also, what if they ask you to carry out a role that you highlighted in your fake role but do not actually have enough experience of having done it? You may find yourself struggling which can see you out of a job pretty sharpish.
    Here is a pretty interesting article about lying on your CV about work experience from someone who works in HR - http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/.../#41611e617c3d

    "And even if false credentials get you the job, those untruths may come back to haunt you.
    "You're subject to immediate dismissal if it turns out you misrepresented something," says Nason. If your company is acquired, for instance, the acquirer's HR department may perform an audit of its new employees. Or your background may be checked when you apply for a promotion. Former Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson, former Notre Dame football coach George O'Leary and celebrity chef Robert Irvine are just three of the people who made news when false background information cost them high-profile jobs." - https://www.monster.com/career-advic...-lies-hot-jobs

    Some other good sources to look at would be:
    http://workplace.stackexchange.com/q...at-would-the-i
    http://www.monster.com/career-advice...on-your-resume

    It might sound appealing, but what about in the future when it costs you a job? If you have the experience and qualifications necessary then you're in with a strong chance without having to lie. You could always expand on the genuine experience you have in a covering letter which could give you a competitive advantage and not come back to haunt you.

    What happens if they search for information about the company and nothing comes up? Or they contact a company with the same name and they say you've never worked there? Lying about what tasks you carried out is one thing, but making up a company and a job role is huge. It makes the application fraudulent e.g they may pursue charges if they find out after they have hired you, blacklist your name, or fire you. There is no good outcome if they find out, they're not going to tell you off and say don't do that again. That's it, you're out and it can affect your application to future jobs even out with that company.

    Saying that, my mum *apparently* knows someone who has said they lied about a qualification to get into a job so eh. Your mileage may vary, although she did later go on and genuinely get that qualification. I definitely would not recommend it and the majority of people would also be the same. Sure, the chances of them finding out might be slim, however the consequences if they do find out can be huge. It may not just affect you in regards to that company but also future companies. Do not do it. If you need more experience on your CV then genuinely go out and get it, and it'll be a lot better for you.

    Also companies within the same industry do communicate with each other - if one company blacklists you, it's quite likely that other companies will do the same.
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    What you're asking for advice with here OP, is committing fraud.

    Whilst what you're thinking of is pretty minor and no doubt there are people out there who've done this on their CV, it's not something that anyone in their right mind would advise you to do. While you might be looking at this work just to make a bit of cash whilst off uni, being sacked from a post for dishonesty has a habit of following you around.

    If you're at uni, go and see if there's someone in student support or careers who can have a look at your CV and help you out if they think it needs anything adding or changing.
 
 
 
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