what does it do?

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    What does a degree in english do for me. I've seen it can lead to journalism however the wage doesn't appeal to me, correct me if I'm wrong but most don't get ihigh pay. If i am wrong, which branch must i go down to get day a yearly salary of 40k or above. What else can a degree in english get me?
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    (Original post by BXWXN)
    What does a degree in english do for me. I've seen it can lead to journalism however the wage doesn't appeal to me, correct me if I'm wrong but most don't get ihigh pay. If i am wrong, which branch must i go down to get day a yearly salary of 40k or above. What else can a degree in english get me?
    https://nationalcareersservice.direc...ournalist.aspx explains more about what a career in nespaper journalism involves. To get £40k or more would require you to be GOOD at your job - not following a specific branch or taking a specific degree.

    https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...degree/english explains the possible careers open to you that are directly related to a degree in English
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    (Original post by BXWXN)
    What does a degree in english do for me. I've seen it can lead to journalism however the wage doesn't appeal to me, correct me if I'm wrong but most don't get ihigh pay. If i am wrong, which branch must i go down to get day a yearly salary of 40k or above. What else can a degree in english get me?
    My understanding is that while some people with English degrees go into journalism, the field really likes people who can write but also know about another field. Anyway, you want a high salary so scratch journalism.

    There are an extraordinary range of other graduate jobs which don't require a particular academic background—often, employers want to know that you have a degree with a 2.1 or a first, as it shows you can work at something for a while, and they'd like you to have that degree from a decent university, but they're not very interested in what exactly you studied or where you studied it. So there's a huge range of things you could be doing with an English degree—my first job after my degree in English was in medical e-learning.

    So the possibilities are kind of too numerous to try listing them. Perhaps what you need to do, if you're interested in studying English and want a high-paying job afterwards, is identify some fields which pay more than £40K/year and don't require a vocational degree, and look into those. What can be more important than the topic of your degree is your ability to show that you're interested in whatever field(s) you wind up applying in. This makes getting some kind of experience on your CV during your degree very useful—summer jobs, internships, university societies and so on can be a big advantage. It can help to identify one or two fields you might be interested in early on and see if you can get any opportunities in those.

    The disadvantage of doing a non-vocational degree is that you don't get a ready-made and explicit system of career progression on graduating. But the related advantages are the freedom to define, with a little preparation and thought, a career that you personally want, and kind of flexibility that readies you for putting in applications for graduate posts in a range of fields at once if necessary.
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    (Original post by QHF)
    My understanding is that while some people with English degrees go into journalism, the field really likes people who can write but also know about another field. Anyway, you want a high salary so scratch journalism.

    There are an extraordinary range of other graduate jobs which don't require a particular academic background—often, employers want to know that you have a degree with a 2.1 or a first, as it shows you can work at something for a while, and they'd like you to have that degree from a decent university, but they're not very interested in what exactly you studied or where you studied it. So there's a huge range of things you could be doing with an English degree—my first job after my degree in English was in medical e-learning.

    So the possibilities are kind of too numerous to try listing them. Perhaps what you need to do, if you're interested in studying English and want a high-paying job afterwards, is identify some fields which pay more than £40K/year and don't require a vocational degree, and look into those. What can be more important than the topic of your degree is your ability to show that you're interested in whatever field(s) you wind up applying in. This makes getting some kind of experience on your CV during your degree very useful—summer jobs, internships, university societies and so on can be a big advantage. It can help to identify one or two fields you might be interested in early on and see if you can get any opportunities in those.

    The disadvantage of doing a non-vocational degree is that you don't get a ready-made and explicit system of career progression on graduating. But the related advantages are the freedom to define, with a little preparation and thought, a career that you personally want, and kind of flexibility that readies you for putting in applications for graduate posts in a range of fields at once if necessary.
    thank you !!!
 
 
 
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