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    I am doing philosophy next year at uni, and the only job I can think of that I would enjoy doing would be teaching philosophy in a college/uni. How would I go about that? I don't want to do teaching as part of my degree exactly, but should I be doing any teacher training stuff in my final year, or does that wait until I've actually finished my degree? Actually, I know two college teachers who started teaching before they had any training or qualifications, and are doing it as they are teaching their classes. Just wondered if anyone had any more information on it, since most teaching training things seem to be aimed at school-age children.
    Although, of course, it is likely I will change my mind within a year and decide to be an astronaut or spy or something.
    Thanks
    Emma
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    (Original post by covered farm wa)
    I am doing philosophy next year at uni, and the only job I can think of that I would enjoy doing would be teaching philosophy in a college/uni. How would I go about that? I don't want to do teaching as part of my degree exactly, but should I be doing any teacher training stuff in my final year, or does that wait until I've actually finished my degree? Actually, I know two college teachers who started teaching before they had any training or qualifications, and are doing it as they are teaching their classes. Just wondered if anyone had any more information on it, since most teaching training things seem to be aimed at school-age children.
    Although, of course, it is likely I will change my mind within a year and decide to be an astronaut or spy or something.
    Thanks
    Emma
    xxx
    I think to teach at uni level, you'd need to do postgrad studies, not sure how to go about college teaching though.
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    you can do a PGDip to teach 16+, but many uni lecturers start lecturing and have to do teacher training as part of their contract.


    Oh if you are going to be a spy you probably shouldn't tell us because then you'd have to kill us, and there are quite a few of us it would take ages.
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    Well looking around at college tutors, most were ex-secondary school teachers and I imagine if you wanted to become a university tutor, you'd have to work to way up too with a sound accademic background.

    However working you way up only applies to teaching AS-Level and degree standard. People who haven't even been to university and have A2's or AVCEs behind them are qualified enough to teach basic computing courses. Also I believe if you took a diploma in say counselling, if you took a PCGE/teaching course you'd be able to teach basic counselling courses.

    Take your degree in philosophy, don't bother doing it jointly with education or anything as this is really suited to those who are teaching in primary/secondary schools.
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    Yeah, do your degree and then do a 1 year PGCE afterwards, then you're qualified.
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    Finish your degree first then do teacher training.
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    (Original post by Jenna999)
    Yeah, do your degree and then do a 1 year PGCE afterwards, then you're qualified.
    Yes, but in most schools you would have to teach RE and only have a tiny proportion of your timetable as A level Philosophy....
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    I could teach in a big college. Its becoming more and more popular as a subject choice, you know.
 
 
 
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