What is the closest field to medicine ? Watch

nisha.sri
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Above ! What alevel do you need ?
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wolfmoon88
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(Original post by nisha.sri)
Above ! What alevel do you need ?
Biomedical Sciences probably. Same A levels as medicine pretty much.
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OvergrownMoose
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Poison studies or some discipline where you learn how to make people ill #Moooose
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leoq8
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Pharmacy? Separate course at some unis. I'd imagine round-about the same A-levels, biology, chemistry etc. Idk if it's as strict as medicine and as hard to get in tho.
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kkboyk
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(Original post by nisha.sri)
Above ! What alevel do you need ?
Nursing?

Anything that belongs to the Biology branch or even medicinal chemistry, e.g. immunology, biomedical science, health science.
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username1842595
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Pharmacy, Nursing, Biomedical Science, Radiography, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine, Immunology?

Pretty much Biology, and/or Chemistry and Physics if you choose Radiography.
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Democracy
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Either dentistry or veterinary surgery.

Similar course structures: two years of pre-clinical teaching, three years of clinical placements.

Similar working principles: history taking, physical examination, investigations, treatment (medical and/or surgical)

Both are professional and highly regulated courses.

Obvious differences are that vets deal with animals and dentists specialise in oral health very early on, but both are far more similar to medicine and being a doctor than biomedical sciences (which is a theoretical, lab based degree with no clinical training).
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smilebright
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Pharmacy is one of the closest and it will only take you four years of studying in uni and one year for practise. you will need at least biology and chemistry a-levels. even though math could be suitable but without t is also fine.
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Mutmit287
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(Original post by nisha.sri)
Above ! What alevel do you need ?
It depends what you mean by your question and which part of medical school entices you:

If you enjoy biology/human biology/cell biology/immunology which are the core biological sciences then something like biomedical sciences would be a good degree.

If you are really into anatomy and the human bodies structure then anatomy would be a good degree.

If you like the idea of treating people, drugs and their uses etc. then pharmacy would be a good degree. If your more into the way drugs work and making them then pharmacology would be a good degree.

if you are interested in the musculoskeletal system of the body and exercise then phyiotherapy.

if you like the idea of delivering babies then midwifery.

If you want something that is close to medicine in terms of clinical practice rather than science then nursing.

There are a whole host of degrees within the medical profession, medicine/dentistry really are just one option here.
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nexttime
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Teaching. Both are equally shafted by clueless government bureaucrats.

That's what you meant right?
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CheeseIsVeg
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Urm the one opposite the cricket pitch which is infested with conkers
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thegodofgod
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Don't bother with pharmacy unless you aim to go into the hospital sector - the community sector is getting shafted left, right and centre by the government.
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taysidefrog
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It depends, if you mean the nearest job to being a doctor I'd say being a nurse. Specialist nurses are doing a lot of the jobs traditionally associated with doctors and if you go in to nurse administration you can earn more than doctors.
I'm mainly a GP but work as a speciality doctor in dermatology 1 session a week at the local DGH.
The specialist dermatology nurses do minor operations (but not on the face and fingers),run roaccutane clinics, cryotherapy clinics, dressings clinics, deal with melanoma follow ups and counselling. There are other specialist nurses in other areas.
It depends which aspect of being a doctor mainly interests you but nursing is more complex than many people realise.
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taysidefrog
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Pharmacists are increasingly working n general practice though. We have a pharmacist in our surgery 1 day a week helping with various prescribing projects and audits. He's currently trying to sort out the chaos that is our nursing homes and their requests for 4 extra tablets of drug A and 5 tablets of drug B to keep their central pharmacy happy.
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