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    can anyone help me w tellin me wat is involved w this particular field of engineerin and wat wld b the helpin prospect if i wanna pass this field iam doin my a-levels at the moment
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    Sorry can't help.
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    Hi

    If you type 'aerospace engineer' in any good search engine you will find loads of information on what the field involves - google is the best one to try. Just as a quick summary..aerospace engineers design, manufacture, maintain, test etc aircraft, spacecraft and missiles just to name a few (you wont do all of these things but what route you choose is down to you). If you decide to do an aerospace engineering degree you can expect to apply physics and maths principles to aircraft as well as spacecraft (how they work, design, aerodynamics, thermodynamics, propulsion for example) - it is a lot broader and covers spacecraft as well as aircraft. However, this is dependent on the University as some University degrees tend to lean towards aircraft with some spacecraft/other vehicle studies and some tend to lean more towards the study of spacecraft.

    If you are more interested in the aircraft side then an aeronautical engineering degree would probably be better for you as this tends to focus purely on aircraft. The theory you learn is similar (aerodynamics, thermodynamics, propulsion, design, stability, statics, dynamics etc) but applies only to aircraft. As with aerospace engineering degrees, the content of the Aeronautical engineering degree can vary slightly from University to University but you will find they all cover the same essential theory - for example Loughborough University includes a lot of design work into their degree.

    I wouldn't go on my information alone, i'm not that clued up on it but I intend to start studying Aeronautical Engineering in September so will be able to tell you more later on. You will find a lot of information if you go and visit the websites of the Universities that offer aerospace/aeronautical engineering degrees as they will explain more about what they are and will state what you actually learn. www.ucas.co.uk will allow you to search for the particular degree and will list all the Universities that offer them. Also look at prospectuses.

    To succeed in any engineering field you should be interested in how things work, and actively improving things to the benefit of others. A keen interest in aircraft or in the case of aerospace engineering spacecraft as well as aircraft is essential. You must also be doing physics and maths at A-level and be of a B grade or above (some Universities will allow lower than this I think) and must enjoy the subjects - there is a lot of maths in aerospace/aeronautical engieering as it is an analytical subject.

    Hope my information has been of some help. If you have any questions then just feel free to ask and I'll try my best to answer them.
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    Lots of fluid mechanics! Lots and lots of lovely fluid mechanics! Can you tell I like fluid mechanics?!
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Lots of fluid mechanics! Lots and lots of lovely fluid mechanics! Can you tell I like fluid mechanics?!
    OOO, i am starting Aerospace Engineering at Surrey Uni this year. Have you got any excellent links to info on fluid mechanics/anything else relevant. I want to read up a little.
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    Definitely worth buying
    --

    Nakayama and Bouncher, "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics", ISBN: 0-340-67649-3

    Excellent introductory guide into the theory of fluids with classic example flow situations. Well presented with solid explanations and sparing use of maths. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.


    "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics", ISBN: 0-521-78748-3

    A CD-ROM providing an experimental introductory into fluid mechanics. Excellent presentation and lots of videos of classic experiments. Certain presentations are interactive, for example, watch what happens to the flow around an aerofoil as you click and change the angle of attack! HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
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    Excellent, thanks for the info. I will be ordering the book from amazon. When i find the CD i will get that aswell.

    Any other useful books that may be a good read for aerospace engineering?
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    Good Aerodynamics books are quite a hard read (either very mathematical or technical) so I wouldn't recommended you go head first into these

    However, you maybe interested in two popular science books by J E Gordon ("Structures or Why Things Don't Fall Down" and "The New Science of Strong Materials or Why You Don't Fall Through the Floor"). These are older books (last updated in the 1980s I think) but are well written and provide a very good overview of the history of structural and material design and include some chapters on early aircraft design.

    RECOMMENDED FOR ALL WANNABE CIVIL, MECHANICAL OR AEROSPACE ENGINEERS
 
 
 
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