Why shouldn't tampons be taxed? Watch

Dheorl
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Now before people have a go at me about being a mysogynistic, privileged whatever else you want to call me, this is a genuine question that I'm hoping someone can sensibly answer. I'm merely curious.

So, from my understanding when people claim tampons are taxed as a "luxury", they seemingly mean they are taxed the same as 99% of products, from adult clothing to furniture and are not treated as an "essential" such as most food and children's clothing. AFAIK there is no additional tax to the standard 20%. If this is wrong could someone please provide a government page showing otherwise.

From various sites around 20 seems a reasonable, sensible, easy to work with number for number of tampons used in a cycle. Assuming women average out to a "regular" 28 day cycle, this means in a year a menstruating woman will go through 260 tampons a year. In the UK there are around 20million women of a relevant age, so that's 520million tampons per year. Assuming an average tampon weighs maybe 5 or 6 grams, thats nearly 3,000 tonnes of waste every single year.

Considering there are non-disposable alternatives, in the form of washable sanitary pads and menstrual cups, shouldn't the convenience of being able to simply throw away the product, at the expense of thousands of tonnes of needless waste, be considered a luxury that people should pay for?

I know there is the argument that women don't choose to have periods and shouldn't have to pay anything, let alone tax, but this applies to so much in life. I have a very fast metabolism, I never chose to, but even lounging around the house I probably have to eat double what most people do. Should I not have to pay for this extra food? Should someone with fair skin not have to pay for the extra suncream they need? By choosing tampons women are choosing to pay more than they have to, and contribute a huge amount more waste to the world that could be avoided, for the sake of their personal convenience. If they choose to do this then to me it's reasonable they are taxed for it.

Right, flame suit on. Try to keep it civil.

[EDIT] Having reread various things as this conversation has gone on I think I may have been mistaken about tampons including a 20% tax, instead they are subject to a rate below the standard VAT. Arguing to get rid of it when it's already lowered seems even more farfetched to me [/EDIT]
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OvergrownMoose
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Why a tampon tax is a joke:

YOU'RE GETTING TAXED FOR HAVING A UTERUS
You can’t choose to menstruate. It’s not an opt-in sort of deal. Like, oh this month I’ve lost my job, I can’t really afford tampons, can we call it off and wait until next month? It happens. If you were born a woman, like half the population are, chances are you’re having periods and there’s nothing you can do about it but bung it up.

HAVING PERIODS ISNT A LUXURY
People seem to think that tampons can be equated to having a hot bath and listening to some chilled music; many people think women are treating themselves to a wodge of synthetic material to shove up their vaginas. Utter decadence.

YOU NEED TAMPONS, YOU DONT NEED JAFFA CAKES
Jaffa cakes, marshmallow teacakes, herbal tea, incontinence products, edible cake decorations, pitta bread, helicopters, crocodile meat. These are all things taxed at zero per cent or exempt from tax altogether. As Creasy highlighted in one of her speeches: “It is when you start looking at what is described as a necessity and what is described as a luxury, that you see the inequalities in this debate.” Do people really believe that the decorations for a flipping cake are more essential than products that stop women bleeding everywhere every month?

IT PENALISES THE WORKING CLASS AND HOMELESS
Tax on sanitary products doesn’t work like income tax. Tampons aren’t cheaper for those who can’t afford them – they’re the same price for everyone. Increasing that price only means that women who are worse off are losing out the most. And sanitary products aren’t really that cheap. For a heavy period, you’re forking out a lot of your monthly budget.

I could go on, but I wont :lol: #Moooose
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999tigger
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I was going to answer, but you made me lose interest at the end.
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OvergrownMoose
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I was going to answer, but you made me lose interest at the end.
Haha! :lol: #Moooose
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AlexS101
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Are disposable baby nappies subject to VAT?
If they are so should tampons, if not neither should tampons (and I say this as a male).
The system of what is and isn't essential in the eyes of VAT is arbitrary and in my opinion not fit for purpose.
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Dheorl
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(Original post by OvergrownMoose)
Why a tampon tax is a joke:

YOU'RE GETTING TAXED FOR HAVING A UTERUS
You can’t choose to menstruate. It’s not an opt-in sort of deal. Like, oh this month I’ve lost my job, I can’t really afford tampons, can we call it off and wait until next month? It happens. If you were born a woman, like half the population are, chances are you’re having periods and there’s nothing you can do about it but bung it up.

HAVING PERIODS ISNT A LUXURY
People seem to think that tampons can be equated to having a hot bath and listening to some chilled music; many people think women are treating themselves to a wodge of synthetic material to shove up their vaginas. Utter decadence.

YOU NEED TAMPONS, YOU DONT NEED JAFFA CAKES
Jaffa cakes, marshmallow teacakes, herbal tea, incontinence products, edible cake decorations, pitta bread, helicopters, crocodile meat. These are all things taxed at zero per cent or exempt from tax altogether. As Creasy highlighted in her speech: “It is when you start looking at what is described as a necessity and what is described as a luxury, that you see the inequalities in this debate.” Do people really believe that the decorations for a flipping cake are more essential than products that stop women bleeding everywhere every month?

IT PENALISES THE WORKING CLASS AND HOMELESS
Tax on sanitary products doesn’t work like income tax. Tampons aren’t cheaper for those who can’t afford them – they’re the same price for everyone. Increasing that price only means that women who are worse off are losing out the most. And sanitary products aren’t really that cheap. For a heavy period, you’re forking out a lot of your monthly budget.

I could go on, but I wont :lol: #Moooose
Did you actually read my post?
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serah.exe
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the tampon tax is the dumbest **** I've ever heard in my life
lol @ the MAD COINCIDENCE that people who don't even have a uterus are the ones saying there should be a tampon tax
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Rachel58
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Not all women can use every sanitary product available. Some women, due to extremely heavy flow, need to use tampons and a pad just to get by, so don't assume that every women is the same.
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Dheorl
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(Original post by Rachel58)
Not all women can use every sanitary product available. Some women, due to extremely heavy flow, need to use tampons and a pad just to get by, so don't assume that every women is the same.
Menstrual cups are meant to be better for women who experience a heavy flow, and if even that isn't enough they could always combine it with a reusable pad. I never assumed every woman is the same, but I'm unaware of a condition that means neither a menstrual cup nor reusable pads are suitable. If such a condition exists please let me know, I'm always happy to learn.
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Dheorl
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(Original post by AlexS101)
Are disposable baby nappies subject to VAT?
If they are so should tampons, if not neither should tampons (and I say this as a male).
The system of what is and isn't essential in the eyes of VAT is arbitrary and in my opinion not fit for purpose.
I'm personally of the opinion both should be taxed. As a child I never had disposable nappies and I'm not aware of it ever causing problems. By choosing to use disposable products people are choosing to produce more waste than necessary, and IMO that should be subject to normal VAT.
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Dheorl
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(Original post by serah.exe)
the tampon tax is the dumbest **** I've ever heard in my life
lol @ the MAD COINCIDENCE that people who don't even have a uterus are the ones saying there should be a tampon tax
I don't see what's wrong with questioning something, irregardless of what's in my pants. If people can come up with a reason as to why tampons are a necessity when there is the option of non-disposable alternatives then I'm all ears.
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serah.exe
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(Original post by Dheorl)
I don't see what's wrong with questioning something, irregardless of what's in my pants. If people can come up with a reason as to why tampons are a necessity when there is the option of non-disposable alternatives then I'm all ears.
Idk man, would you rather wear pads which you have to replace continuously throughout the day (we're talking loads), that bleeds through the pads so it messes up your underwear, worry you might stain whatever you sit on. Or would you rather wear a tampon which isn't messy and have to change every 6-8 hours?
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Dheorl
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(Original post by serah.exe)
Idk man, would you rather wear pads which you have to replace continuously throughout the day (we're talking loads), that bleeds through the pads so it messes up your underwear, worry you might stain whatever you sit on. Or would you rather wear a tampon which isn't messy and have to change every 6-8 hours?
I'd assume tampons are more comparable to cups?
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yudothis
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In order to answer this you must first determine what the point of a tax is.

Also people saying "if x is taxed so should y but if x is not neither should y" - why make it dependent? It is straightforward, should they be taxed or not. Making it dependent on something else means you are biasing your view.
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Arima
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non-disposable alternatives? i don't know mate it'll be hard to manage reusable sanitary towels when you juggling your social life your working life your academic life etc. It's too inconvenient. Especially if you have heavy flow (with sanitary towel i typically have to change them every 2-3 hours to make sure i don't leak, and even then can be super uncomfy when yr pad is full of your innards). Do you know how hard it is to wash off blood stains?
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Dheorl
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(Original post by yudothis)
In order to answer this you must first determine what the point of a tax is.

Also people saying "if x is taxed so should y but if x is not neither should y" - why make it dependent? It is straightforward, should they be taxed or not. Making it dependent on something else means you are biasing your view.
In my opinion the purpose of tax is to raise money for the governing of our country and provision of public services. For this, everything that is not 100% essential to a healthy life should be taxed. The more you consume, the more you contribute. I can certainly see arguments for having no income tax, merely VAT, based on this.

Beyond this, products which are detrimental to society should also be taxed to try and discourage their use, and/or to provide money to help counteract the negative effects.

From what I can see, disposable products when there is the option of a non-disposable alternative falls into both categories. If someone could provide a logical reason as to why this is not the case then I am all ears.
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yudothis
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(Original post by Dheorl)
In my opinion the purpose of tax is to raise money for the governing of our country and provision of public services. For this, everything that is not 100% essential to a healthy life should be taxed. The more you consume, the more you contribute. I can certainly see arguments for having no income tax, merely VAT, based on this.

Beyond this, products which are detrimental to society should also be taxed to try and discourage their use, and/or to provide money to help counteract the negative effects.

From what I can see, disposable products when there is the option of a non-disposable alternative falls into both categories. If someone could provide a logical reason as to why this is not the case then I am all ears.
Raise money for the government.

Would you say the government should have the ability to decide how it raises money?
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Dheorl
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(Original post by Arima)
non-disposable alternatives? i don't know mate it'll be hard to manage reusable sanitary towels when you juggling your social life your working life your academic life etc. It's too inconvenient. Especially if you have heavy flow (with sanitary towel i typically have to change them every 2-3 hours to make sure i don't leak, and even then can be super uncomfy when yr pad is full of your innards). Do you know how hard it is to wash off blood stains?
Plenty of women seem to. Also please refer to my earlier comments about cups. And I spend as much time as possible throwing myself down mountains in various forms, I have plenty of experience washing off bloods stains.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by Dheorl)
Beyond this, products which are detrimental to society should also be taxed to try and discourage their use, and/or to provide money to help counteract the negative effects.

From what I can see, disposable products when there is the option of a non-disposable alternative falls into both categories. If someone could provide a logical reason as to why this is not the case then I am all ears.
Do you use a razor? Is it a straight razor that you sharpen before each use? Or do you use those tax-free disposable Mach IIIs?
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Dheorl
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(Original post by yudothis)
Raise money for the government.

Would you say the government should have the ability to decide how it raises money?
In the capacity that they are there to act as representatives for the population, yes, the government should have the ability to decide how to raise money.

Also please don't try and twist my words, I said raise money for the governing of the country, not for the government.
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