sarah3030
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Francis owns all the shares of his company. He sells 2/15 of the shares to Spencer and 5/12 of the shares to Jamie. What fraction of the shares does Francis still own. Can you explain your answer please
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sarah3030
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Ive done that. 1- 8/60 -25/60 is the equation but according to the book, the answer is 27/60
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LifeIsFine
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(Original post by labmasteruk786)
2/12 + 5/12 = 7/12

12/12 - 7/12 = 5/12
This is not correct.
You have to add 2/15 and 5/12 and then subtract it from one. 1-(2/15+5/12) will be your answer.
To find this, find the lowest common multiple of 12 and 15.
Then change the fractions so they have the same denominator.
Then add them, before taking this away from one.
Only check the spoiler if you're stuck
Spoiler:
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The lowest common multiple is 60, so you'll have to change 2/15 and 5/12 into fractions over 60.
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labmasteruk786
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(Original post by sarah3030)
Ive done that. 1- 8/60 -25/60 is the equation but according to the book, the answer is 27/60
Your working is correct.do the subtraction again
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RDKGames
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(Original post by sarah3030)
Francis owns all the shares of his company. He sells 2/15 of the shares to Spencer and 5/12 of the shares to Jamie. What fraction of the shares does Francis still own. Can you explain your answer please
He starts with 100% of his shares - so his initial value is 1

He gives away 2/15 to Spencer - this means he now has 1-2/15 shares left which is equal to 15/15 - 2/15 = 13/15 shares.

He then gives away 5/12 of his shares - so continuing on he now has 13/15 - 5/12 = 52/60 - 25/60 = 27/60 of his shares

In essence you have 1 - \frac{2}{15} - \frac{5}{12} = \frac{60}{60} - \frac{8}{60} - \frac{25}{60} = \frac{27}{60}
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labmasteruk786
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(Original post by LifeIsFine)
This is not correct.
You have to add 2/15 and 5/12 and then subtract it from one. 1-(2/15+5/12) will be your answer.
To find this, find the lowest common multiple of 12 and 15.
Then change the fractions so they have the same denominator.
Then add them, before taking this away from one.
Only check the spoiler if you're stuck
Spoiler:
Show
The lowest common multiple is 60, so you'll have to change 2/15 and 5/12 into fractions over 60.
I know I delete it because I read it to quickly lol.
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LifeIsFine
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(Original post by labmasteruk786)
I know I delete it because I read it to quickly lol.
lol, no problem
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sarah3030
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(Original post by LifeIsFine)
This is not correct.
You have to add 2/15 and 5/12 and then subtract it from one. 1-(2/15+5/12) will be your answer.
To find this, find the lowest common multiple of 12 and 15.
Then change the fractions so they have the same denominator.
Then add them, before taking this away from one.
Only check the spoiler if you're stuck
Spoiler:
Show
The lowest common multiple is 60, so you'll have to change 2/15 and 5/12 into fractions over 60.
I know that part, but the book says that the answer is 27/60. How do you get 1- 8/60 - 25/60????
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LifeIsFine
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(Original post by sarah3030)
I know that part, but the book says that the answer is 27/60. How do you get 1- 8/60 - 25/60????
The book is right.
You are right as well up to your end calculation.
8/60 +25/60=33/60.
1-33/60=27/60.
1 is the same as 60/60
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sarah3030
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Thanks! I know i sound like a complete idiot, but what does -1 stand for. Surely if we subtracted 1 from the equation, it would be 32/60
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RDKGames
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(Original post by sarah3030)
Thanks! I know i sound like a complete idiot, but what does -1 stand for. Surely if we subtracted 1 from the equation, it would be 32/60
You're not subtracting 1 anywhere.
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sarah3030
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(Original post by RDKGames)
You're not subtracting 1 anywhere.
completely forgot that 1 = 60/60. Thanks for the help
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User1212
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(Original post by sarah3030)
Francis owns all the shares of his company. He sells 2/15 of the shares to Spencer and 5/12 of the shares to Jamie. What fraction of the shares does Francis still own. Can you explain your answer please
He sold 33/60 so he now owns 27/60 the denominator in both fractions need to be the same so mulitiply both fractions in order to achieve this, multiply the first one top and bottom by 4 and the second one top and bottom by 5, this will give you 2 fractions as 60th's
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duty.-of-.fruty
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bit more explained for the stupid me here pls :>
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