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    Hello all,

    I'm in a rather confused state of mind here. I am currently attending a two year community college in the United States. Upon completion I will have an associates in computer science. However, after that I can transfer to a 4 year university. (starting from the 3rd year, since i've completed two years at a community college)

    Now, by the time I graduate from the community college, I should have my American Passport in hand. I'm considering and thinking about studying in the UK instead of continuing in the United States. (The reason being that I don't have a good computer science university near my area, so I would have to go far away or to another state and pay out of state tuition.)

    I understand I would have to be paying international fees in the UK, but its still lower than what i'd pay in the USA.

    Would a Computer Science degree (bachelors as they call it in the USA) from the UK be acceptable or valued in the USA?
    I would plan on coming back to the USA to work as a programmer or software engineer.

    Thanks in advance for your opinions and advice!
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    (Original post by r2d2picachu)
    Would a Computer Science degree (bachelors as they call it in the USA) from the UK be acceptable or valued in the USA?
    I would plan on coming back to the USA to work as a programmer or software engineer.
    Yes, it is valued the same.
    Ideally you'd want to spend a year doing a placement here (working for a company as an intern or under-paid employee) to really make your international study seem justified and not just to save some cash.

    Also, in the UK we call an undergraduate degree a "Bachelor's" and a postgraduate degree a "Master's". You would get a BSc (Bachelor of Science) qualification at the end.
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    (Original post by Luneth)
    Yes, it is valued the same.
    Ideally you'd want to spend a year doing a placement here (working for a company as an intern or under-paid employee) to really make your international study seem justified and not just to save some cash.

    Also, in the UK we call an undergraduate degree a "Bachelor's" and a postgraduate degree a "Master's". You would get a BSc (Bachelor of Science) qualification at the end.
    Thanks for your quick reply! I am not sure I understand what you mean by doing a placement year to make my study seem justified. Are you taking about in terms of money?
    The cost of the education shouldn't be too much of a problem for me personally. Is the placement year required?
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    (Original post by r2d2picachu)
    Thanks for your quick reply! I am not sure I understand what you mean by doing a placement year to make my study seem justified. Are you taking about in terms of money?
    The cost of the education shouldn't be too much of a problem for me personally. Is the placement year required?
    No, I mean doing a placement year or just working for a year with a British company would be good for your Resume. Placement years are completely optional (unless you find a course that specifically includes one).
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    (Original post by Luneth)
    No, I mean doing a placement year or just working for a year with a British company would be good for your Resume. Placement years are completely optional (unless you find a course that specifically includes one).
    Oh I see. That would make sense. Do you think it would easy for a citizen of the USA to get a student visa in the UK? I'm planning on possibly applying to Kingston University in London for computer science.
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    (Original post by r2d2picachu)
    Oh I see. That would make sense. Do you think it would easy for a citizen of the USA to get a student visa in the UK? I'm planning on possibly applying to Kingston University in London for computer science.
    There'd probably be no problem with that, the issue is more with actually getting in to a university. There's only so many international student places on each course and you're competing with people from everywhere outside of the EU.

    I don't know when you finish your community college studies, but international applications start from September 1st, so you've already missed 2 months where you could have been applying (2 months where other people have already applied ahead of you).
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    (Original post by Luneth)
    There'd probably be no problem with that, the issue is more with actually getting in to a university. There's only so many international student places on each course and you're competing with people from everywhere outside of the EU.

    I don't know when you finish your community college studies, but international applications start from September 1st, so you've already missed 2 months where you could have been applying (2 months where other people have already applied ahead of you).
    I didn't consider that honestly. Thanks for bringing it up. I would hope that it wouldn't be so tough to such an extreme point.

    Also, I would be finishing community college in the next two years, so I have a while from now.

    I also just remembered that the UK has decided to leave the European Union. Would that cause any problems when I would apply in the next two years or so?
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    (Original post by r2d2picachu)
    I also just remembered that the UK has decided to leave the European Union. Would that cause any problems when I would apply in the next two years or so?
    You're a non-EU international student, so probably not.
    EU int. students may have to go through the same channels that non-EU int. students do right now (so even more competition for you, potentially), but I couldn't say what's actually going to happen.
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    Wow haha! So much competition that I didn't consider. Looks like i'll have to work hard for it. I appreciate the help and information you gave!
 
 
 
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