ghosnius
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I'm currently planning on switching from my current brick university Psychology BSc to a more law specific Forensic Psychology degree with the OU (since I'm aspiring to enter the field of forensic psychology), however I've been reading very mixed reviews about the OU and I'm wanting to see reviews of anyone who has experience doing a Psychology BSc, or even better the Forensic Psychology BSc with the OU full-time? I am also told that the OU is slightly less accredited as it is predominantly designed for people who can't go to uni full-time - however, the OU is the only uni with a Forensic Psychology BSc in my area (given that it is an online course!) I would plan on entering a MSc after finishing my BSc, but would that be affected by the fact it is an OU course? Would this be an good prospective career choice? Is the student support in the Psychology/Forensic Psychology BScs of a high standard? Thanks!
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by ghosnius)
I'm currently planning on switching from my current brick university Psychology BSc to a more law specific Forensic Psychology degree with the OU (since I'm aspiring to enter the field of forensic psychology), however I've been reading very mixed reviews about the OU and I'm wanting to see reviews of anyone who has experience doing a Psychology BSc, or even better the Forensic Psychology BSc with the OU full-time? I am also told that the OU is slightly less accredited as it is predominantly designed for people who can't go to uni full-time - however, the OU is the only uni with a Forensic Psychology BSc in my area (given that it is an online course!) I would plan on entering a MSc after finishing my BSc, but would that be affected by the fact it is an OU course? Would this be an good prospective career choice? Is the student support in the Psychology/Forensic Psychology BScs of a high standard? Thanks!
Do you have any other reasons for wanting to move university? Looking at the "forensic" psychology course, it doesn't actually seem as if they offer any forensic modules untill 3rd year (http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/conten...factsheets/q82). Realistically, any BPS psychology degree will still have to cover all the basic psychology topics so you will still be spending most of your time studying non-forensic psychology modules. Surely it would be better if you just complete your current course so that you can start a forensic psychology msc by the time you would be doing third year of the forensic psychology OU course?
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ghosnius
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
Do you have any other reasons for wanting to move university? Looking at the "forensic" psychology course, it doesn't actually seem as if they offer any forensic modules untill 3rd year (http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/conten...factsheets/q82). Realistically, any BPS psychology degree will still have to cover all the basic psychology topics so you will still be spending most of your time studying non-forensic psychology modules. Surely it would be better if you just complete your current course so that you can start a forensic psychology msc by the time you would be doing third year of the forensic psychology OU course?
Understandably, the BPS accreditation requires for much of the degree to be core-psychology. However, I would think that the degree would still be more geared towards law in comparison with straight Psychology given that the degree is forensic? Wouldn't it be more advantageous to have a named Honours degree in Forensic Psychology, rather than straight Psychology, to enter a Forensic Psychology-related MSc? The convenience of being able to access the entire course online is also appealing, however I'm concerned that the quality of the staff-to-student relationship is too poor and will potentially jeopardise the degree, as is being made apparent by several accounts of those who have studied with the OU. On the other hand, some students have found the support to be very good - it seems to vary drastically from course to course. Any details on the quality of the Psychology staff of the OU would be great.
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by ghosnius)
Understandably, the BPS accreditation requires for much of the degree to be core-psychology. However, I would think that the degree would still be more geared towards law in comparison with straight Psychology given that the degree is forensic? Wouldn't it be more advantageous to have a named Honours degree in Forensic Psychology, rather than straight Psychology, to enter a Forensic Psychology-related MSc? The convenience of being able to access the entire course online is also appealing, however I'm concerned that the quality of the staff-to-student relationship is too poor and will potentially jeopardise the degree, as is being made apparent by several accounts of those who have studied with the OU. On the other hand, some students have found the support to be very good - it seems to vary drastically from course to course. Any details on the quality of the Psychology staff of the OU would be great.
It makes 0 difference what the degree name says. If anything it will probably look worse when you apply for non-psychology jobs as some employers won't really understand what it is.

I can't answer much about OU specific questions - i'd recommend try in the open university forum for that! However it doesn't look like there actually is ANY forensic psychology that you would study until third year, so i don't really see any advantage in moving courses, especially given the additional money and time from you if your already in a undergrad course. By the time you get to the third year of this "forensic" psychology undergrad course you could be doing a FP masters which would be much better
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