eupheme
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Can anyone please proofread my controlled assessment? I am aiming for an A* so I would also appreciate it if you could give me tips on how to improve the quality of my language etc. Thanks x
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eupheme
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(Original post by maliese)
Hiya

I actually am German, so I'm happy to help! Your text was really very good but here are my suggestions. Feel free to ask anything, and I'll make sure to explain!
wow, thank you so much!!
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CivilAsAnOrange
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Are you sure it's okay for you to post this? You might want to check, it's possible it would be flagged up during a plagiarism check.
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eupheme
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(Original post by CivilAsAnOrange)
Are you sure it's okay for you to post this? You might want to check, it's possible it would be flagged up during a plagiarism check.
oh that's true - thank you for telling me. i'll delete it once you see the reply
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CivilAsAnOrange
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
oh that's true - thank you for telling me. i'll delete it once you see the reply
I've seen it
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eupheme
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(Original post by maliese)
Hiya

I actually am German, so I'm happy to help! Your text was really very good but here are my suggestions. Feel free to ask anything, and I'll make sure to explain!
.
hi, thanks again for checking this for me, it really helped
but please could you delete your post? someone told me that it could get picked up on in a plagiarism check.
thank you !!
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eupheme
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(Original post by CivilAsAnOrange)
I've seen it
please could you delete the quote from your post before? it has the text of my controlled assessment in it
thank you !
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Bigpaddy27
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If this is gcse work, i am gobsmacked, A* 100%. The level you are writing is well into A-level German standard. You are using cases such as the dative really well. I am studying at A2 and the way you are writing would be seen as perfectly fine in our A2 class.
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CivilAsAnOrange
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
please could you delete the quote from you post before? it has the text of my controlled assessment in it
thank you !
Done. Sorry, didn't think about that. Good luck. It's a good, generally very accurate piece of work. You're going to do great.
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eupheme
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(Original post by CivilAsAnOrange)
Done. Sorry, didn't think about that. Good luck. It's a good, generally very accurate piece of work. You're going to do great.
thanks, i hope so
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eupheme
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(Original post by Bigpaddy27)
If this is gcse work, i am gobsmacked, A* 100%. The level you are writing is well into A-level German standard. You are using cases such as the dative really well. I am studying at A2 and the way you are writing would be seen as perfectly fine in our A2 class.
really ?? my teacher said it's very good for gcse but never anything like a2. i'm glad you think so, it gives me a lot more confidence

what is a-level german like? i am probably choosing french as i find the grammar easier but my speaking/accent is not so good as my german :/ would you recommend german? do you know anyone who is doing both and could compare?
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Asolare
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
really ?? my teacher said it's very good for gcse but never anything like a2. i'm glad you think so, it gives me a lot more confidence

what is a-level german like? i am probably choosing french as i find the grammar easier but my speaking/accent is not so good as my german :/ would you recommend german? do you know anyone who is doing both and could compare?
Hello, I'm not the same person but I am doing A-Level German. On a word about picking French because the grammar is easier do not be fooled. Romance languages have grammar/word order etc. that's very similar to English at first, so it doesn't seem to difficult. But as you go further on, you realise at A-Level the grammar in romance languages will step up a lot, whereas German is honestly not that difference to GCSE minus the subjunctive and passive.

I haven't actually done A Level French, but I've spoken to people before who do it and they say they couldn't believe how much more difficult the grammar got and seem to reallyyyy struggle with it.

I can't vouch for the current spec of German as it's different to the one I'm on, but it's definitely fun. You should really consider it; some of the topics in AS are a bit bland like media/fashion, but when you get to A2 and have full on debates, learn history and do cultural analysis, it's a wild party.
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lostintrnslation
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
really ?? my teacher said it's very good for gcse but never anything like a2. i'm glad you think so, it gives me a lot more confidence

what is a-level german like? i am probably choosing french as i find the grammar easier but my speaking/accent is not so good as my german :/ would you recommend german? do you know anyone who is doing both and could compare?
i do both french and german at a level. i am much better at german than i am at french (in all areas) but i didn't want to stop learning french. both a levels are pretty much the same, so you can apply your exam technique to both subjects. i know on my exam board, with the reformed a level, pronunciation isn't worth as many marks as it used to be. and you do way more work on your speaking in lessons at a level than you do at gcse
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Asolare
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(Original post by lostintrnslation)
i do both french and german at a level. i am much better at german than i am at french (in all areas) but i didn't want to stop learning french. both a levels are pretty much the same, so you can apply your exam technique to both subjects. i know on my exam board, with the reformed a level, pronunciation isn't worth as many marks as it used to be. and you do way more work on your speaking in lessons at a level than you do at gcse
Fgs

Wish I was on the reformed A-Level now.
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CivilAsAnOrange
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
really ?? my teacher said it's very good for gcse but never anything like a2. i'm glad you think so, it gives me a lot more confidence

what is a-level german like? i am probably choosing french as i find the grammar easier but my speaking/accent is not so good as my german :/ would you recommend german? do you know anyone who is doing both and could compare?
I'm currently doing both. To be honest, both languages have their difficulties. Personally I'd say it's easier to improve your written grammar with constant practice than your speaking, so I'd pick German (then again, German is my favourite, so that might be personal bias). One thing to think about is that the A-level oral exam is a big step up from GCSE. It wasn't a big deal for me because I did IGCSEs, so I never got to pre-prepare much, I was used to being asked unexpected questions in the exam and making up answers on the go. My classmates, on the other hand, who did GCSE, found it tough to transition from answering questions they knew they would be asked and that they'd prepared answers for to spontaneous conversation. If you find it tricky to speak spontaneously in one of these languages, you might want to consider picking the other one. Your course may not have let you memorise answers though, I don't know. Plus everyone's different, the things people find hard vary.

What I would consider is which culture interests you more. It's all very well being good at the grammar, but at the end of the day if you're regularly discussing things that bore you to tears you'll find yourself regretting taking languages and potentially losing focus in class - trust me, there's one topic of French I still struggle to remember from AS because I found it difficult to concentrate when it was so dull. If you aren't ready to spend a fair few lessons discussing the impact of fascism, for example, don't take German. If dictatorships fascinate you, German is the language for you. If you don't fancy discussing things like the Burkini ban, maybe don't go for French - there tends to be quite a lot of discussion of religious freedoms etc. because of their secularism policy. You will discuss issues that are important in that country, so read the news and work out what fascinates you the most. You don't necessarily have to agree with the country's policy, but having a strong opinion either way is helpful when it comes to debating in the oral. Nuclear power is always going to be a big topic in French, because they use so much of it, but not so much in German, because nuclear power is banned in Germany. Things like that. Pick something you have a passion for - at the end of the day, you don't learn the language solely for the language's sake, you learn it to be able to communicate with new people, see new perspectives and access works of literature/ films/ music which you wouldn't have understood otherwise.

Then there's the film/history/geography/literature questions. Find out which of these your school will prep you for. For me it's the literature. If that's true for you, find out what you'll be reading. In French we're currently doing a selection of stories by Maupassant which I absolutely adore. I look forward to lit lessons every week. That's one thing I'll miss when I go to uni - from what I've read of both, I kind of prefer French literature to German (which I'm planning to study). Then again, I tend to prefer older literature, and the texts I've read in German have been more modern. Hope this helps.
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Bigpaddy27
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
really ?? my teacher said it's very good for gcse but never anything like a2. i'm glad you think so, it gives me a lot more confidence

what is a-level german like? i am probably choosing french as i find the grammar easier but my speaking/accent is not so good as my german :/ would you recommend german? do you know anyone who is doing both and could compare?
The language you are using is definitely A-level standard. Your range of grammar is better than mine and i am on A2 and on track for an A grade at least. However, the a level has several aspects e.g i excel in the speaking exams, i pour out ideas in my essays and i am good at the reading tasks however i am weak at grammar but i am working on my grammar however you have written very well here.
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eupheme
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(Original post by Inexorably)
Hello, I'm not the same person but I am doing A-Level German. On a word about picking French because the grammar is easier do not be fooled. Romance languages have grammar/word order etc. that's very similar to English at first, so it doesn't seem to difficult. But as you go further on, you realise at A-Level the grammar in romance languages will step up a lot, whereas German is honestly not that difference to GCSE minus the subjunctive and passive.

I haven't actually done A Level French, but I've spoken to people before who do it and they say they couldn't believe how much more difficult the grammar got and seem to reallyyyy struggle with it.

I can't vouch for the current spec of German as it's different to the one I'm on, but it's definitely fun. You should really consider it; some of the topics in AS are a bit bland like media/fashion, but when you get to A2 and have full on debates, learn history and do cultural analysis, it's a wild party.
aargh
guess i might have to reconsider then, but it just doesn't feel right to study german ?? that might be because i was so sure about doing french though

(Original post by lostintrnslation)
i do both french and german at a level. i am much better at german than i am at french (in all areas) but i didn't want to stop learning french. both a levels are pretty much the same, so you can apply your exam technique to both subjects. i know on my exam board, with the reformed a level, pronunciation isn't worth as many marks as it used to be. and you do way more work on your speaking in lessons at a level than you do at gcse
that's how i feel about the gcses - basically the same content, in two different languages.
which exam board are you?

(Original post by CivilAsAnOrange)
I'm currently doing both. To be honest, both languages have their difficulties. Personally I'd say it's easier to improve your written grammar with constant practice than your speaking, so I'd pick German (then again, German is my favourite, so that might be personal bias). One thing to think about is that the A-level oral exam is a big step up from GCSE. It wasn't a big deal for me because I did IGCSEs, so I never got to pre-prepare much, I was used to being asked unexpected questions in the exam and making up answers on the go. My classmates, on the other hand, who did GCSE, found it tough to transition from answering questions they knew they would be asked and that they'd prepared answers for to spontaneous conversation. If you find it tricky to speak spontaneously in one of these languages, you might want to consider picking the other one. Your course may not have let you memorise answers though, I don't know. Plus everyone's different, the things people find hard vary.

What I would consider is which culture interests you more. It's all very well being good at the grammar, but at the end of the day if you're regularly discussing things that bore you to tears you'll find yourself regretting taking languages and potentially losing focus in class - trust me, there's one topic of French I still struggle to remember from AS because I found it difficult to concentrate when it was so dull. If you aren't ready to spend a fair few lessons discussing the impact of fascism, for example, don't take German. If dictatorships fascinate you, German is the language for you. If you don't fancy discussing things like the Burkini ban, maybe don't go for French - there tends to be quite a lot of discussion of religious freedoms etc. because of their secularism policy. You will discuss issues that are important in that country, so read the news and work out what fascinates you the most. You don't necessarily have to agree with the country's policy, but having a strong opinion either way is helpful when it comes to debating in the oral. Nuclear power is always going to be a big topic in French, because they use so much of it, but not so much in German, because nuclear power is banned in Germany. Things like that. Pick something you have a passion for - at the end of the day, you don't learn the language solely for the language's sake, you learn it to be able to communicate with new people, see new perspectives and access works of literature/ films/ music which you wouldn't have understood otherwise.

Then there's the film/history/geography/literature questions. Find out which of these your school will prep you for. For me it's the literature. If that's true for you, find out what you'll be reading. In French we're currently doing a selection of stories by Maupassant which I absolutely adore. I look forward to lit lessons every week. That's one thing I'll miss when I go to uni - from what I've read of both, I kind of prefer French literature to German (which I'm planning to study). Then again, I tend to prefer older literature, and the texts I've read in German have been more modern. Hope this helps.
i do regular gcses, so spontaneity isn't really covered, apart from with foreign language assistants etc. but i don't think one or the other is more difficult ?
all those topics seem interesting enough to me, but i do feel more of a connection to french culture and film/lit/etc
and moreover french is great for joining doctors without borders (which i would like to do for a while after university) because they need more volunteers who are fluent in french and arabic, so it kind of ties in with future plans.
we do either film or literature, but i'm not sure what exactly we study. i'll ask my french teacher about that one
thanks for your advice !!

(Original post by Bigpaddy27)
The language you are using is definitely A-level standard. Your range of grammar is better than mine and i am on A2 and on track for an A grade at least. However, the a level has several aspects e.g i excel in the speaking exams, i pour out ideas in my essays and i am good at the reading tasks however i am weak at grammar but i am working on my grammar however you have written very well here.
aah i see - i think speaking might be my weak point. thank you + good luck on your exams!
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Asolare
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
aargh
guess i might have to reconsider then, but it just doesn't feel right to study german ?? that might be because i was so sure about doing french though



that's how i feel about the gcses - basically the same content, in two different languages.
which exam board are you?



i do regular gcses, so spontaneity isn't really covered, apart from with foreign language assistants etc. but i don't think one or the other is more difficult ?
all those topics seem interesting enough to me, but i do feel more of a connection to french culture and film/lit/etc
and moreover french is great for joining doctors without borders (which i would like to do for a while after university) because they need more volunteers who are fluent in french and arabic, so it kind of ties in with future plans.
we do either film or literature, but i'm not sure what exactly we study. i'll ask my french teacher about that one
thanks for your advice !!



aah i see - i think speaking might be my weak point. thank you + good luck on your exams!
If you don't feel German is right for you then don't force yourself to do it at A-Level, pick the one you'd enjoy more even if it might be more difficult in some areas
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lostintrnslation
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(Original post by rumaisa_)
that's how i feel about the gcses - basically the same content, in two different languages.
which exam board are you?
wjec (or eduqas as it's called in england now)
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eupheme
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(Original post by Inexorably)
If you don't feel German is right for you then don't force yourself to do it at A-Level, pick the one you'd enjoy more even if it might be more difficult in some areas
yeah you're right ... my preference is mostly based on the teachers though

(Original post by lostintrnslation)
wjec (or eduqas as it's called in england now)
oh we do aqa so it might be very different! (or exactly the same who knows)
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