daisybavage
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Hoping to study BA Acting, wondering how good the course is and also what student life is like at these universities:

Surrey
UCA Farnham
Falmouth
Bournemouth
Bath Spa
Chichester
Birmingham City

Thanks!
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DrSocSciences
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Those courses are more likely to produce drama teachers than actors.
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daisybavage
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
Those courses are more likely to produce drama teachers than actors.
Do you mean those particular universities or just doing an acting degree in general?
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by daisybavage)
Do you mean those particular universities or just doing an acting degree in general?
Both.
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daisybavage
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
Both.
I couldn't afford Drama School so I decided to do a degree in Acting instead, acting degrees still train you to become an actor, some universities have drama schools within the uni meaning you get the training of a drama school but with the financial aid of student loans etc., so acting degrees do actually train you, theatre studies and drama degrees are perhaps what you mean, they study acting with a more educational approach
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by daisybavage)
I couldn't afford Drama School so I decided to do a degree in Acting instead, acting degrees still train you to become an actor, some universities have drama schools within the uni meaning you get the training of a drama school but with the financial aid of student loans etc., so acting degrees do actually train you, theatre studies and drama degrees are perhaps what you mean, they study acting with a more educational approach
No, I meant exactly what I wrote, because staff at those unis rely on their teaching rather than acting income, and lacked the talent to teach at one of the major drama schools. So whatever training they provide, they're still more likely to produce cohorts of students who become drama teachers rather than actors.
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daisybavage
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
No, I meant exactly what I wrote, because staff at those unis rely on their teaching rather than acting income, and lacked the talent to teach at one of the major drama schools. So whatever training they provide, they're still more likely to produce cohorts of students who become drama teachers rather than actors.
I get your point, but there are still successful actors who studied at universities and not drama school, so it can't be completely awful.
At the end of the day, I can't go to drama school, so it's irrelevant if the teachers are better there; it's a given that training is higher quality at drama schools than universities, but I don't have the luxury of being able to consider that.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by daisybavage)
I couldn't afford Drama School so I decided to do a degree in Acting instead, acting degrees still train you to become an actor, some universities have drama schools within the uni meaning you get the training of a drama school but with the financial aid of student loans etc., so acting degrees do actually train you, theatre studies and drama degrees are perhaps what you mean, they study acting with a more educational approach
(Original post by daisybavage)
I get your point, but there are still successful actors who studied at universities and not drama school, so it can't be completely awful.
At the end of the day, I can't go to drama school, so it's irrelevant if the teachers are better there; it's a given that training is higher quality at drama schools than universities, but I don't have the luxury of being able to consider that.
Yes, you can become a professional actor with a degree from a university rather than a specialist drama school, but your chances will be much smaller. As well as the quality of the teaching, which you acknowledge, there is also the quantity of time you spend training. University contact hours will be smaller and more time will be spent on the theory.

I am slightly confused by you saying you can't afford drama school given that you get the same student loans at Rada, Lamda etc as you would at Falmouth or Bournemouth. If you are refering to the audition fees, then I would advise you to beg or borrow what you can because in the long run the amount would be inconsequential and the potential return on that investment could be enormous.
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PQ
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For what it's worth - there is quite a difference between the number of graduates from the Falmouth BA Acting and the AUB BA Acting degrees going on to work in creative industries (it's not possible to identify how many are acting).

Compare the final stats on https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search (10% in Artistic careers) to https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search (50% in artistic careers). The difference between the two is at least as large as the difference between the AUB course and the Old Vic course: https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search (85% in artistic careers) or LAMDA https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search (60 in artistic careers).

(and for the rest of the list above
https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search Bath Spa 45%
https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search BCU 75%
https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search Chichester 5%
https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search UCA Farnham 10%
- there's clear differences between which degrees *can* be used to launch an acting career and which you'd be fighting against the tide to come out of as a professional actor).

Those pages also show the average pay and unemployment rates after graduation too.
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Fourth Monkey Actor Training Company
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Hi Daisy,

A massive conundrum for many people at this time of year I fully understand. I guess the main question is 'what do you want to do as a career?' If the answer to that is work professionally within the arts, specifically as a performer or creative the likelihood of you being able to achieve that goal is by training on a vocational actor training programme or course, a university course, although highly valuable in itself is much more likely to lead you to a more academic role in or around the arts industry. The contact hours and depth of actor training is the main difference here, most actor training programmes will have you training actively for 40+ hours a week. This is the primary difference. However, drama school in it's traditional sense isn't the only route available. There are a number of established 'new schools' out there offering vocational actor training, with equally impressive graduate employment figures within the arts. Fourth Monkey's graduate employment figures for 2015 was higher than any listed above for example, and similar to a number of other courses such as the MTA (musical theatre academy) are offering accelerated courses over two years as opposed to three to reduce the overall cost. A variety of funding options are available too, so it may be worth you doing a little additional reading and looking into some of the additional and alternative courses out there that are taking a fresh approach to actor training as well as looking at the drama school and university options. Additionally, as outlined above, the student finance options are available on the Drama School options you mention too, so it doesn't appear to have to off your radar if you are considering student finance for university.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by Fourth Monkey Actor Training Company)
Hi Daisy,

A massive conundrum for many people at this time of year I fully understand. I guess the main question is 'what do you want to do as a career?' If the answer to that is work professionally within the arts, specifically as a performer or creative the likelihood of you being able to achieve that goal is by training on a vocational actor training programme or course, a university course, although highly valuable in itself is much more likely to lead you to a more academic role in or around the arts industry. The contact hours and depth of actor training is the main difference here, most actor training programmes will have you training actively for 40+ hours a week. This is the primary difference. However, drama school in it's traditional sense isn't the only route available. There are a number of established 'new schools' out there offering vocational actor training, with equally impressive graduate employment figures within the arts. Fourth Monkey's graduate employment figures for 2015 was higher than any listed above for example, and similar to a number of other courses such as the MTA (musical theatre academy) are offering accelerated courses over two years as opposed to three to reduce the overall cost. A variety of funding options are available too, so it may be worth you doing a little additional reading and looking into some of the additional and alternative courses out there that are taking a fresh approach to actor training as well as looking at the drama school and university options. Additionally, as outlined above, the student finance options are available on the Drama School options you mention too, so it doesn't appear to have to off your radar if you are considering student finance for university.
But not standard student finance...
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rebeccatierney3
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How about St Mary's in Twickenham? I'm going there in September. The course is 90% practical with 30 contact hours. It's a drama school in a university context.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by rebeccatierney3)
How about St Mary's in Twickenham? I'm going there in September. The course is 90% practical with 30 contact hours. It's a drama school in a university context.
Ummm, the OP has probably graduated by now! 😀
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rebeccatierney3
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Aw, crap! Only just checked that it's from 3 years ago! 😂😂
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by rebeccatierney3)
Aw, crap! Only just checked that it's from 3 years ago! 😂😂
Been there, done that!
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Slh178
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Did you end up going to St Mary’s ? If so how were you finding it up until Corona?
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