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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    You'd be most likely to use the ihr form on a forum. No one's stopping you using the Sie form, though. :p:
    OK, thanks I suppose I could just check my grammars but that would mean moving the things that are on top of them, and I kind of like trying to remember things rathern that going to look them up.

    So, irregular verbs don't keep the 2nd/3rd person inflection in the imperative? (Ie. "ich fahre, du fährst", and so on, but not "fähr!").
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    (Original post by Da Bachtopus)
    So, irregular verbs don't keep the 2nd/3rd person inflection in the imperative? (Ie. "ich fahre, du fährst", and so on, but not "fähr!").
    As far as I know, the imperative is never based on the 2nd/3rd person inflection... Isn't it [Stammsilbe]/[Stammsilbe + -t]?
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    "Eben" means "just" in a chronological sense, e.g. "ich habe das eben (= just now) gemacht".
    Is it interchangeable with 'gerade'?
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    @generalebriety and jonnythemoose(sorry, forgot to thank you as well!):
    Thank you guys for the explanation! :hug: You guys are inspirational. ^_^ that I really want to work hard on my german in order to be good as you guys. =D

    (Original post by generalebriety)
    What do you mean?
    I saw an article on the internet in german and it had "Im Laufen der Zeit" in one fo the sentences, I didn't understand what it meant, and I tried a translation website and it came out with "over time"/"in process of time", which didn't really make any sense to me.XD
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    (Original post by yg110uk)
    I saw an article on the internet in german and it had "Im Laufen der Zeit" in one fo the sentences, I didn't understand what it meant, and I tried a translation website and it came out with "over time"/"in process of time", which didn't really make any sense to me.XD
    Im Laufe der Zeit, surely? Anyway, "over time" is the correct translation.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    As far as I know, the imperative is never based on the 2nd/3rd person inflection... Isn't it [Stammsilbe]/[Stammsilbe + -t]?
    I thought 2nd person imperative of "nehmen" was "nimm!"? I'd assumed it was based on 2nd-person form... I will check when I do my German homework (yes, I have homework again now I've graduated :rolleyes: )
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    As far as I know, the imperative is never based on the 2nd/3rd person inflection... Isn't it [Stammsilbe]/[Stammsilbe + -t]?
    No. In retrospect, 'fahren' was a bad example - but it was an example of something with an 'ä' in the 'du' form, which always falls out.

    New example: sehen.
    du: sieh!
    ihr: sieht!
    Sie: sehen Sie!

    (This is an awful example, because "siehe" is actually quite common, but "sehen" is the only irregular verb where this extra e is allowed. Can anyone come up with a better one?)

    (Original post by jonnythemoose)
    Is it interchangeable with 'gerade'?
    In this context, yes. "Eben" has some other meanings too.
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    (Original post by Da Bachtopus)
    I thought 2nd person imperative of "nehmen" was "nimm!"? I'd assumed it was based on 2nd-person form... I will check when I do my German homework (yes, I have homework again now I've graduated :rolleyes: )
    Thank you. Much better example. Nimm / nimmt / nehmen Sie.

    That ä always changes back to an a (if there was an a in the stem, of course), but otherwise it's just the 'du' form with bits hacked off.

    (None of this works for 'sein' and 'haben' and the really irregular ones... in fact, I think they might be the only two.)
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Thank you. Much better example. Nimm / nimmt / nehmen Sie.

    That ä always changes back to an a (if there was an a in the stem, of course), but otherwise it's just the 'du' form with bits hacked off.

    (None of this works for 'sein' and 'haben' and the really irregular ones... in fact, I think they might be the only two.)
    OK, thanks. The "a" strong verbs are an exception. Now to learn the conjugations of all 180 of the things...
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    Ah, right, looks like I got confused, then. Sorry about that. I've never really thought about this, though, to be honest.:dontknow:

    Could it be that there's an etymological reason for this, so it's "fahr" etc. because the "ä" in "fährst" is the result of an "i-Umlaut" (basically an extra syllable that changed the quality of the previous vowel but was eventually dropped)?
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    The imperative always fascinates me.
    And just checking, the imperatives for sein are: du sei | ihr seid | Sie seien
    ...and haben: du hab | ihr habt | Sie haben, right?

    (Original post by hobnob)
    Im Laufe der Zeit, surely? Anyway, "over time" is the correct
    translation.
    Ah, I see, thanks! And woah, looks like translation websites are actually not that bad. =D
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    (Original post by yg110uk)
    The imperative always fascinates me.
    And just checking, the imperatives for sein are: du sei | ihr seid | Sie seien
    ...and haben: du hab | ihr habt | Sie haben, right?


    Ah, I see, thanks! And woah, looks like translation websites are actually not that bad. =D
    Woah, hold on - don't get confused. The imperatives are: sei / seid / seien Sie, and hab / habt / haben Sie. There's no 'du' or 'ihr' in the imperatives, but there's always a 'Sie' (after the verb).
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    Gosh hearing you talk about all this stuff makes me realise how much I still have to learn :/
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Gosh hearing you talk about all this stuff makes me realise how much I still have to learn :/
    And yet looking back over the last 100 pages should make you realise how far you've come in such a short time. I'm actually quite impressed with your progress.
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    noob question:

    what's the difference between 'im' and 'in'?

    when do you use which?
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    (Original post by verse)
    noob question:

    what's the difference between 'im' and 'in'?

    when do you use which?
    "im" = "in dem"
    So basically you use "im" when it's in + dative and the dative object is masculine or neuter. "In" by itself can take either the dative or the accusative.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    And yet looking back over the last 100 pages should make you realise how far you've come in such a short time. I'm actually quite impressed with your progress.
    Haha, ja, ich bin ganz glueklich mit was ich gelernt habe. Bald, werde ich Harry Potter auf Deutsch lesen, das wird eine herausforderung sein!
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Haha, ja, ich bin ganz glueklich mit was ich gelernt habe. Bald, werde ich Harry Potter auf Deutsch lesen, das wird eine herausforderung sein!
    Du solltest stolz auf dich sein!
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Haha, ja, ich bin ganz gluecklich mit dem, was ich gelernt habe. Bald werde ich Harry Potter auf Deutsch lesen, das wird eine Herausforderung sein!
    You need a "dem" there, I'm afraid (basically it's the German way of saying "the things I have learnt").

    Edit: by the way, I agree: you've improved quite a bit - well done!
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    Danke Du machst mich erroeten! (I think my girlfriend said you can't say that in German but I don't know what else to put).
 
 
 
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