German learners' society Watch

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uthred50
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#3461
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#3461
(Original post by wtid)
Wow das ist viel Deutsch! I would need a day to read all that. (I wanted to say that in German) but I don't know how to say "i would need..."
I'd probably say 'ich müsste' for 'i would need'.

Or possibly: 'Ich würde .... brauchen'

Wow i haven't posted in this thread for ages
My German is going a bit downhill cause i've stopped using it
Mind you, I don't get all of the stuff you sat here (especially generalebriety - you're too good at German! :p:)
I'm more used to the slang german the teens use from talking to many of them :p:
wtid
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#3462
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#3462
(Original post by SpiritedAway)
i would say it is, "ich werde..........brauchten" (i'm not too sure if i've spelt 'need' right though, i couldn't decide whether or not it had the 't').
As far as I'm aware, that's "I WILL ______ need" (it's brauchen). I'll ask my ex, she's online now and is German.

Ok, it's "ich würde __________ brauchen "
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SpiritedAway
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#3463
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#3463
(Original post by wtid)
As far as I'm aware, that's "I WILL ______ need" (it's brauchen). I'll ask my ex, she's online now and is German.

Ok, it's "ich würde __________ brauchen "
see, not too bad. i wasn't far off.
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Fleece
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#3464
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#3464
(Original post by wtid)
As far as I'm aware, that's "I WILL ______ need" (it's brauchen). I'll ask my ex, she's online now and is German.

Ok, it's "ich würde __________ brauchen "
:eek: ex?
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wtid
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#3465
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#3465
(Original post by Fleece)
:eek: ex?
lol, what's the matter with that?
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Fleece
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#3466
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#3466
(Original post by wtid)
lol, what's the matter with that?
Is this another German girlfriend you've had?!
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wtid
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#3467
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#3467
(Original post by Fleece)
Is this another German girlfriend you've had?!
Oh, yes, sorry The other one was from near Darmstadt. Me and Friederike are still happily together and hopefully moving in together in London next month
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SpiritedAway
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#3468
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#3468
oh, congrats wtid
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Fleece
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#3469
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#3469
(Original post by wtid)
Oh, yes, sorry The other one was from near Darmstadt. Me and Friederike are still happily together and hopefully moving in together in London next month
oh good! I can stop panicking then!

ooh I did my work experience in Darmstadt...twinned with my home town.
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wtid
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#3470
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#3470
(Original post by Fleece)
oh good! I can stop panicking then!

ooh I did my work experience in Darmstadt...twinned with my home town.
Haha panicking eh?:p: So you're from Chezzer? Never knew that, although I seem to remember you saying something about Sheffield.
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generalebriety
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#3471
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#3471
(Original post by Fleece)
:eek: ex?
:rofl: I did exactly the same. :p:
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generalebriety
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#3472
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#3472
(Original post by wtid)
Wow das ist viel Deutsch! I would need a day to read all that. (I wanted to say that in German) but I don't know how to say "i would need..."
Ich würde einen ganzen Tag brauchen*, um das alles zu lesen.

*(Instead of "würde ... brauchen", you can also get away with "brauchte" (though only in situations where you're certain it can't be confused with the past), or the lovely little southern German misformed Konjunktiv II "bräuchte". :p:)
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Fleece
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#3473
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#3473
(Original post by generalebriety)
Ich würde einen ganzen Tag brauchen*, um das alles zu lesen.

*(Instead of "würde ... brauchen", you can also get away with "brauchte" (though only in situations where you're certain it can't be confused with the past), or the lovely little southern German misformed Konjunktiv II "bräuchte". :p:)
Hahaha I was just gonna say "i'd say bräuchte".......been living with the swabes too long!
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Fleece
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#3474
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#3474
(Original post by wtid)
Haha panicking eh?:p: So you're from Chezzer? Never knew that, although I seem to remember you saying something about Sheffield.
Well I always like a good love story, and long distance relationships working out give me a bit of hope.

Indeed, Chesvegas. I just escaped back to Leeds. For obvious reasons.
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wtid
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#3475
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#3475
(Original post by Fleece)
Well I always like a good love story, and long distance relationships working out give me a bit of hope.

Indeed, Chesvegas. I just escaped back to Leeds. For obvious reasons.
Leeds is an improvement on Chesvegas? Maybe a bit but the accent is enough to keep me away :p:

Anyway, quite a few LDRs work out, at least the ones in our society anyway. Are you in one?

Oh, and, shouldn't that be schwabes? Now we're off to her cousins birthday where I can play Tisch Tennis!
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Fleece
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#3476
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#3476
(Original post by wtid)
Leeds is an improvement on Chesvegas? Maybe a bit but the accent is enough to keep me away :p:

Anyway, quite a few LDRs work out, at least the ones in our society anyway. Are you in one?

Oh, and, shouldn't that be schwabes? Now we're off to her cousins birthday where I can play Tisch Tennis!
I was referring to the Schwaben yes, but said it in English..swabians...swabes...

Leeds is a big improvement on Chesterfield. Leeds accent is mega.

Yeah newly in one, we met on our Auslandsjahr in Germany but now we've both come home and he's in Australia :-\ Bit crap.
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kiss_me_now9
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#3477
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#3477
WTID, how do you find all these German girls that are datable?! All the German guys I've met are either slightly wierd or very drunk.
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Titaniyum
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#3478
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#3478
(Original post by generalebriety)
:angel:

Na ja, du wirst schon sehen. Das, was du bis jetzt von ihrem Verhalten gesehen hast, könnte ja alles bedeuten.
Stimmt. Mal sehen!

(Original post by generalebriety)
...because verhungern is intransitive.
Auf diese grammatikalische Regel bin ich noch nie gestoßen. Könntest du mir sie bitte ein bisschen weiter erklären? Ich habe nach "Intransitive verbs" im Internet gesucht und habe keine gute Erklärungen gefunden. Ich weiß nicht warum ich zu lassen hinzufügen muss und wann ich das Gleiche in anderen Sätzen machen soll? Ich habe andere Beispiele auch sonstwo gesehen z.B. "Wenn es sich nicht vermeiden lässt" und möchte es richtig verstehen. Vielleicht kennst du eine Website wo ich eine ausführliche Erklärung finden könnte?

Danke im Voraus!
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generalebriety
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#3479
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#3479
(Original post by Titaniyum)
Stimmt. Mal sehen!



Auf diese grammatische Regel bin ich noch nie gestoßen. Könntest du mir sie bitte ein bisschen weiter erklären? Ich habe nach "Intransitive verbs" im Internet gesucht und habe keine gute Erklärungen gefunden. Ich weiß nicht warum ich zu lassen hinzufügen muss und wann ich das Gleiche in anderen Sätzen machen soll? Ich habe andere Beispiele auch sonstwo gesehen z.B. "Wenn es sich nicht vermeiden lässt" und möchte es richtig verstehen. Vielleicht kennst du vielleicht eine Website wo ich eine ausführliche Erklärung finden könnte?

Danke im Voraus!
Sure, but I'll switch to English (because I don't like explaining grammar in German).

A transitive verb is one that takes an object. For instance, "töten" is always a transitive verb: if someone said to you "er hat getötet", you'd be asking "er hat wen getötet?", i.e. you'd instinctively feel there was an object missing from the sentence. In the sentences "ich habe ihn geschlagen", "ich habe das Auto gefahren", "ich habe den Wein getrunken", the verbs schlagen, fahren and trinken are all transitive - they've taken an object. An intransitive verb is one that doesn't take an object, like "schwimmen", or "reisen".

Sadly, in English (as in German), a lot of verbs can be both. The English verb "to starve" can be intransitive ("after four days without food, he starved"), i.e. when it means "to die of hunger", but it can also be transitive like in your sentence ("I didn't want to starve the cat"), i.e. when it means "to kill through depriving of food", or "to cause to die of hunger". The German verb verhungern is intransitive, i.e. it means the former (die of hunger) rather than the latter (cause to die of hunger), so you have to say "I didn't want to leave / cause the cat to starve" - "ich wollte die Katze nicht verhungern lassen". Some German examples of this are "essen" ("wir haben in einem Restaurant gegessen", "ich habe viele Bonbons gegessen"), "trinken", "lesen".

If you know any French, this is exactly the reason we have "cuire" (to cook, i.e. to be heated up until you're cooked) and "faire cuire" (to cook, i.e. to cause something (a piece of meat, say) to cook, in the previous sense of the word).
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SpiritedAway
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#3480
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#3480
so so would 'zu lassen' come after all of these verbs? or what happens to them?
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