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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    "einen" is the accusative of "man"
    I did not know that :eek:
    (Original post by generalebriety)
    It's fine, I just think it's a bit of an odd tone for an exam. "In an ideal world, all adverts would be banned! No, but seriously..."
    Think I'd get marked down for that then? Can't a guy have a relaxed conversation? :p: That's how I'd talk if I was speaking my native language.
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    aber diese 'Übersetzung' gibt es nicht ganz wieder "möge" drückt mehr einen Wunsch aus
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    i know this is probably a stupid question but i'm having a bit of a mind block with grammar!

    does "es gibt" need the accusative or dative after it? i just realised it is from "geben" so should it be dative?? i've always used accusative but then there may be a reason i am re-learning grammar

    vielen dank
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    :eek: i just thought it was nominative
    :getmecoat:
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    oh bum maybe it is...
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    but i'm often wrong :sad:
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    It's accusative.
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    see, i said i was wrong :sad:
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    hallo jungs und mädels

    moin moin

    ich bin neu hier wie gehts euch allen so?
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    but is it from geben? and if so why is it not dative? but thank you anyway =]
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    Technically it's from geben yes, but it's just a set construction, 'es gibt'...it doesn't 'give' anything to anyone...just like if you were using geben you wouldn't use the dative unless you were giving it to someone...

    i.e.

    Ich gebe dem Mann den Apfel.

    der Mann is in the dative and der Apfel is in the accusative because wen oder was gebe ich dem Mann? and wem oder was gebe ich den Apfel?

    I just sorta blurted that out so it wasn't too well explained...
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    i see... so if you say "es gibt ein Kino", its the Kino that is being given not who it is being given to? therefore accusative! thank you! =]
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    Yeah...but try not to think of it as being given lol, it's just a phrase!
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    i know, its the whole 'geben' thing that made me confused. i just accepted the prase 'es gibt' then revised grammar and thought that some rule must apply! i think im getting the hang of it tho
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    Goodo. Any more queries just give us a shout.
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    (Original post by 02k7)
    but is it from geben? and if so why is it not dative? but thank you anyway =]
    Hallo,

    'geben' verlangt ein Akkusativobjekt, aber man kann auch noch ein Dativobjekt unterbringen. z.B. "Peter gibt seinem Vater (Dativ) ein Buch (Akkusativ).
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    Oh, sorry, I haven't read all your posts. "es gibt" in the sense of "there is" is a phrase that is always followed by an accusativ, at least I can't think of anything else right now.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    What on earth is "du mögest"? Is it subjunctive? ("Damit du mögest sehen, an dich hab' ich gedacht" - a line from Die Winterreise.)
    "Mögen" as a modal verb has a function which is more or less identical to that of "may"/"might": "So you might see I was thinking of you". It's a bit of an old-fashioned construction, though, which is probably why you haven't come across it before.
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    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    Hi generalebriety,

    "mögest" ist der Konjunktiv I, also die Möglichkeitsform des Modalverbs "mögen"
    der Indikativ (Wirklichkeitsform) Präsens/Präteritum : ich mag/mochte,
    du magst/mochtest, er mag/mochte, wir mögen/mochten, ihr mögt/mochtet,
    sie mögen/mochten

    der Konjunktiv I : ich möge, du mögest, er möge, wir mögen, ihr möget, sie mögen

    der Konjunktiv II : ich möchte, du möchtest, er möchte, wir möchten, ihr möchtet, sie möchten

    dann gibst es noch Partizip I : mögend, und Partizip II : gemocht

    mag und möchte/mochte wird schon noch verwendet, aber möge eher nicht mehr, das gehört zu den aussterbenden Wendungen der deutschen Sprache.

    übersetzt in die heutige Sprechweise würde man wohl sagen: "damit Du sehen kannst, dass ich an Dich gedacht habe"
    Thanks.

    (Original post by hobnob)
    "Mögen" as a modal verb has a function which is more or less identical to that of "may"/"might": "So you might see I was thinking of you". It's a bit of an old-fashioned construction, though, which is probably why you haven't come across it before.
    Actually, I had come across it, but only ever as "mögen", so I assumed the equivalent form would be "du magst sehen". I've also seen "das mag wohl sein". Guess the subjunctive works too. Thanks.

    Another question about mögen: can it be modal? (That is, can I use it with another verb, e.g. "ich mag das machen", even if it is dialectic or clumsy?)
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Thanks.


    Actually, I had come across it, but only ever as "mögen", so I assumed the equivalent form would be "du magst sehen". I've also seen "das mag wohl sein". Guess the subjunctive works too. Thanks.

    Another question about mögen: can it be modal? (That is, can I use it with another verb, e.g. "ich mag das machen", even if it is dialectic or clumsy?)
    I think that only works when there's a negation involved, i.e. as in "Ich mag nicht lügen". Otherwise you'd either use "möchte" or an infinitive construction.
 
 
 
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