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    [QUOTE=Meela]Oh, I sooo love the word "Abwrackprämie". That' such a typical German word.

    You're right, the German language is ideally suited to create new words.
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    (Original post by Meela)
    The infinitive is helfen, btw.
    Yeah, it would be the dative because of "helfen".
    I just wanted to say that you only have to ask "Wem/Wen" to find out what case it is but I guess that doesn't help anyone who isn't a native speaker
    Haha that's exactly what my girlfriend said too. Maybe I should learn how to use that, would make cases a lot easier!
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Danke everyone who helped

    That's hard to understand, I never really see the differences. I can kinda see there's a difference between "he helped her" and "he helped her friend" but I don't know what it is, and wouldn't be able to see, had you not pointed it out :p: So the ending of "ihm" would depend on the gender and case of the following noun? How would I know the case? I can only tell a case based on which preposition it follows or which verb it follows (I think) - would it be whichever case "hilfen" uses, in this example?
    you don't need to whack anything on 'ihm' because 'ihm' is just like the 'ihr' version - in English, to him. You would obviously use 'his' for possessives in English, and so 'sein' with appropriate ending in German.
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    you don't need to whack anything on 'ihm' because 'ihm' is just like the 'ihr' version - in English, to him. You would obviously use 'his' for possessives in English, and so 'sein' with appropriate ending in German.
    I'm useless with grammar. I don't have a clue about even English grammar so that's just over my head :p: I'll have to re-read that when I have more time and see if I can get my head around it, thanks
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    Judy gibt ihm das Buch. (dative version of 'him' so 'ihm')
    Ich habe ein Geschenk für ihn. (accusative version of 'him' so 'ihn')
    Er hat seine Katze mitgebracht. (and then 'his' possessive pronoun, with a feminine ending as it relates to die Katze)

    Odd sentences I know haha. But was just trying to demonstrate the different uses there of 'him' and 'his'.

    I dunno if that's made things any clearer, as I say, I'm not too hot at explaining stuff
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Danke everyone who helped

    That's hard to understand, I never really see the differences. I can kinda see there's a difference between "he helped her" and "he helped her friend" but I don't know what it is, and wouldn't be able to see, had you not pointed it out :p: So the ending of "ihm" would depend on the gender and case of the following noun? How would I know the case? I can only tell a case based on which preposition it follows or which verb it follows (I think) - would it be whichever case "hilfen" uses, in this example?
    Helfen takes the dative (I used it because we were talking about "ihr").

    No - I used the example of "ihm" to help you understand how "ihr" worked, but it seems to have gone the other way, and your misunderstanding of "ihr" is spilling over into your understanding of "ihm". :p: The word "ihm" means "(to) him", and doesn't take an ending. The word "sein" means "his / belonging to him", and takes endings as appropriate to agree with the following noun. The feminine form of "ihm" is "ihr", and doesn't take endings; the femining form of "sein" is "ihr", and does take endings.

    Just try to think about the analogous situation when you're talking about masculine or neuter objects. Hoffentlich werden dir folgende Beispiele helfen:

    I helped him = ich half ihm
    I helped her = ich half ihr

    I gave him the book = ich gab ihm das Buch
    I gave her the book = ich gab ihr das Buch

    I gave you his book / his letter = ich gab dir sein Buch / seinen Brief
    I gave you her book / her letter = ich gab dir ihr Buch / ihren Brief

    I gave him his book = ich gab ihm sein Buch
    I gave her her book = ich gab ihr ihr Buch (yes, it is hard to say :p:)

    I gave him his letter = ich gab ihm seinen Brief
    I gave her her letter = ich gab ihr ihren Brief
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    does anyone know what 'watershed' is in German. i don't mean as in geography, i mean TV-wise i can't find it
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    dict.cc says die Zeitgrenze
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    does anyone know what 'watershed' is in German. i don't mean as in geography, i mean TV-wise i can't find it
    There's no proper word for it in German as far as I'm aware. "Zeitgrenze", as Joly suggested, is pretty much a literal translation of what it is, though, so it should work, I suppose.:dontknow:
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    thanks guys :hugs:
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    My first idea by just looking at it was "überflutet".:rolleyes:
    But the dic said, in context with TV: post-watershed programme - Erwachsenenprogramm
    it probablly means a timeline from where on (?) it's not save to watch TV anymore :o:
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    does anyone know what 'watershed' is in German. i don't mean as in geography, i mean TV-wise i can't find it
    Germans don't have a watershed. They also have no word for tail-gating, because for Germans that is just driving. lol.
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    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    My first idea by just looking at it was "überflutet".:rolleyes:
    But the dic said, in context with TV: post-watershed programme - Erwachsenenprogramm
    OK, dann bilde ich es mir nicht nur ein... Es ist wirklich kein feststehender Begriff, oder?
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    OK, dann bilde ich es mir nicht nur ein... Es ist wirklich kein feststehender Begriff, oder?
    Mir fällt auch keiner ein.
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    (Original post by Languagesfreak)
    You don't need commas in the places where I've highlighted them
    Edit: you were right about aufwachst, but it's with an umlaut.
    Danke sehr! Ich habe die Prufung passiert
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    (Original post by TimmyVermicelli)
    Danke sehr! Ich habe die Prufung passiert
    "Bestanden". "Passieren" would only be used for situations like passing through customs at the airport or something like that. With exams, it's always "bestehen".
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Helfen takes the dative (I used it because we were talking about "ihr").

    No - I used the example of "ihm" to help you understand how "ihr" worked, but it seems to have gone the other way, and your misunderstanding of "ihr" is spilling over into your understanding of "ihm". :p: The word "ihm" means "(to) him", and doesn't take an ending. The word "sein" means "his / belonging to him", and takes endings as appropriate to agree with the following noun. The feminine form of "ihm" is "ihr", and doesn't take endings; the femining form of "sein" is "ihr", and does take endings.

    Just try to think about the analogous situation when you're talking about masculine or neuter objects. Hoffentlich werden dir folgende Beispiele helfen:

    I helped him = ich half ihm
    I helped her = ich half ihr

    I gave him the book = ich gab ihm das Buch
    I gave her the book = ich gab ihr das Buch

    I gave you his book / his letter = ich gab dir sein Buch / seinen Brief
    I gave you her book / her letter = ich gab dir ihr Buch / ihren Brief

    I gave him his book = ich gab ihm sein Buch
    I gave her her book = ich gab ihr ihr Buch (yes, it is hard to say :p:)

    I gave him his letter = ich gab ihm seinen Brief
    I gave her her letter = ich gab ihr ihren Brief
    Thanks for that explanation

    So basically:
    ihm = him
    sein = his
    ihr = her
    ihr = hers

    ?
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Thanks for that explanation

    So basically:
    ihm = him
    sein = his
    ihr = her
    ihr = hers

    ?
    No, that should be "her" - but "her" used as a possessive pronoun. I.e. "her" as in "he handed her her ticket", as opposed to "he handed her her ticket".
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    No, that should be "her" - but "her" used as a possessive pronoun. I.e. "her" as in "he handed her her ticket", as opposed to "he handed her her ticket".
    hmmm that's the confusing thing to me, working out which ihr I need - one with an ending or one without. Is it always the one with the ending when you're talking about an item belonging to the person (i.e as you said, "her ticket")?
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    (Original post by wtid)
    hmmm that's the confusing thing to me, working out which ihr I need - one with an ending or one without. Is it always the one with the ending when you're talking about an item belonging to the person (i.e as you said, "her ticket")?
    As I said, the "ihr" that corresponds to "sein" takes endings. The "ihr" that corresponds to "ihm" doesn't. So yes - "ihr" takes endings (the same ones as "sein") if it's possessive (but: "ihr Freund", "ihr Buch" - it doesn't take endings in some genders/cases, just like "sein" doesn't).
 
 
 
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