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    (Original post by lunareclipse)
    Hey everyone!

    Could you please tell me how do I say "I couldn't come because I had a lot of housework" in German?

    Thanks in advance!!
    Ich konnte nicht kommen, weil ich viel Hausarbeit hatte.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    "Letzte Woche habe ich einer alten Frau über die Straße geholfen."
    Aber klingt diesen Satz ein bisschen wie man and die alte Frau zusammen ueber der Strasse stehen (zB auf einer Bruecke), als man die Frau geholft hatte, oder?
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    (Original post by Tom)
    Aber klingt diesen Satz ein bisschen wie man and die alte Frau zusammen ueber der Strasse stehen (zB auf einer Bruecke), als man die Frau geholft hatte, oder?
    Vital distinction between "über der Straße" (dative, hence positional - somewhere over the street) and "über die Straße" (accusative, hence motion - from one side of the street to the other). Just like the difference between "ich fahre in die Stadt" (I'm going into town) and "ich fahre in der Stadt" (= "ich bin in der Stadt, und ich fahre"). You're right that if hobnob had said "der" rather than "die" it would've sounded like you were helping some old woman who happened to be above the street somewhere...
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    I have returned :teeth:. I will write in English, simply because for the last 7 days straight I have spoke nothing but German and my last post kind of showed how bad my German is (not just in general, but when I am tired :laugh:.)
    I found that this year that I wasn't so embarrassed by my mistakes. Last year the the year before I spoke little German simply because I was too embarrassed of my German, but this year, I tried to speak as much German as possible, and even though I did make many mistakes I wasn't hesitant to ask for directions when I needed them and to reply to random strangers in the street when they tried to strike up a conversation. Everyone was really nice when I did make a mistake, haha even when I went into a bakery and asked for a "küche" instead of a "kuchen" haha, I always get those two words mixed up for some reason .
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    Yeah, I think that's the biggest problem when learning (or improving) the language directly in the target country. I've the same problem here in England. As long as I'm talking with other international students everything is alright, but as soon as I'm talking to native speakers I know that they notice EVERY little mistake and get a bit shy... I think that's just normal, but if you seriously want to learn the language, you have to overcome your shyness, that's why you actually go to the country. Hope you enjoyed yourself and that you liked the Kuchen!
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    I'm usually too embarrassed to talk to anyone in German, but this on my course they have something called conversation classes which force me to speak, so I am getting better at letting go. But I still don't think I am any good at German...
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    Even though I make many mistakes, I'm pretty much forced to when I'm staying at her house or going to see her relatives, since nobody speaks English :tongue:

    Kim, you should have seen the kinds of things Friederike had to learn in English, when she was doing English at Abitur. The phrases she had for language tests were so stupid, she will never have need for them again, it seemed like a waste of time! Can't think of any now, though :o:

    Billy, yeah I meant English <--> German, but from the picture on the link, it looked like it was soley German. I'll try and have a look in Waterstones today, if I find one.
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    (Original post by Tom)
    Aber klingt diesen Satz ein bisschen wie man and die alte Frau zusammen ueber der Strasse stehen (zB auf einer Bruecke), als man die Frau geholft hatte, oder?
    What GE said.
    Basically, "über" + accusative means "across", while "über" + dative means "above".
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    quick question
    the word 'mensch' - is it one of those words like 'soldat' that take an 'en' at the end when they're not in the nominative case?

    (I can't remember what they're called - weak nouns?)

    If so, does 'Mensch' become 'Menschen' in the accusative case, although it's still singular??


    thanks for your help
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Kim, you should have seen the kinds of things Friederike had to learn in English, when she was doing English at Abitur. The phrases she had for language tests were so stupid, she will never have need for them again, it seemed like a waste of time! Can't think of any now, though
    It's very strange, though I guess some obscure things have to be learnt to put others into context? Like in our textbook they have people talking about their lives, so I guess they have to have their jobs in there, even if they are weird things like a Shaman...
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    (Original post by Rosamund123)
    quick question
    the word 'mensch' - is it one of those words like 'soldat' that take an 'en' at the end when they're not in the nominative case?

    (I can't remember what they're called - weak nouns?)

    If so, does 'Mensch' become 'Menschen' in the accusative case, although it's still singular??


    thanks for your help
    :yep:
    Singular: der Mensch / des Menschen / dem Menschen / den Menschen
    Plural: die Menschen / der Menschen / den Menschen / die Menschen
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Vital distinction between "über der Straße" (dative, hence positional - somewhere over the street) and "über die Straße" (accusative, hence motion - from one side of the street to the other). Just like the difference between "ich fahre in die Stadt" (I'm going into town) and "ich fahre in der Stadt" (= "ich bin in der Stadt, und ich fahre"). You're right that if hobnob had said "der" rather than "die" it would've sounded like you were helping some old woman who happened to be above the street somewhere...
    Ah yes, of course. Meh. I thought through the grammar in one direction (i.e. from meaning to grammar, to get it right in my sentence) but never considered reversing the process (i.e. from grammar to meaning).
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    :yep:
    Singular: der Mensch / des Menschen / dem Menschen / den Menschen
    Plural: die Menschen / der Menschen / den Menschen / die Menschen
    cheers!
    and are they called weak nouns or did I just totally make that up?!
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    (Original post by Rosamund123)
    cheers!
    and are they called weak nouns or did I just totally make that up?!
    I think so...

    http://www.vistawide.com/german/gram...an_nouns03.htm
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    (Original post by Rosamund123)
    cheers!
    and are they called weak nouns or did I just totally make that up?!
    I have no idea, I'm afraid... It sounds like a plausible name for them, though.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    I have no idea, I'm afraid... It sounds like a plausible name for them, though.
    Yes they are called weak nouns They're also called adjectival nouns.
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    This may seem like a weird question, but is the word "cornflakes" a generic word for "cereal" in German. Because when I was in Germany I was asked if I wanted some cornflakes for my breakfast, and I said yes, but I got nesquick instead . Some of the other English on the exchange also said that they were asked if they wanted conflakes and everyone got some random cereal .
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    This may seem like a weird question, but is the word "cornflakes" a generic word for "cereal" in German. Because when I was in Germany I was asked if I wanted some cornflakes for my breakfast, and I said yes, but I got nesquick instead . Some of the other English on the exchange also said that they were asked if they wanted conflakes and everyone got some random cereal .
    Short answer, yes :tongue:

    Her parents come in 15 minutes *puts German hat on*
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    This may seem like a weird question, but is the word "cornflakes" a generic word for "cereal" in German. Because when I was in Germany I was asked if I wanted some cornflakes for my breakfast, and I said yes, but I got nesquick instead . Some of the other English on the exchange also said that they were asked if they wanted conflakes and everyone got some random cereal .
    There is the word "Cerealien" but hardly anyone (among the elderly people) uses it exept the advertising business. Most mixtures with oat flakes in it are called "Müsli" the other stuff is mostly referred to as "Cornflakes". The younger ones though know the brand names.
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    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    There is the word "Cerealien" but hardly anyone (among the elderly people) uses it exept the advertising business. Most mixtures with oat flakes in it are called "Müsli" the other stuff is mostly referred to as "Cornflakes". The younger ones though know the brand names.
    Friederike is 19 and she refers to all of them as Cornflakes, so don't go making assumptions
 
 
 
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