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    so geht es mir auch :sigh:
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    Normalerweise bringe ich so viel Zeit auf der hörenden Teil die Prüfung zu, also habe ich weniger Zeit für der grammatik oder lesende Teil die Prüfung.
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    (Original post by wannabe mexican)
    Ich hab meine Mündliche Prüfung bestanden! woot!

    Gestern fand ich heraus, dass ich einen 5,000 Wörter 'Research Project' im Auslandsjahr machen muss. Das heißt auch, dass ich nicht unbedingt ein Dissertation schreiben muss!! Freue mich schon drauf!!
    Ja ich muss das auch machen.

    Ich wuensche alle viel Glueck bei den Pruefungen. Ich habe auch eine Hoerpruefung am morgen.
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    I am going to fail. Again. :sadnod:. I know the grammar rules, but looking at practise questions and I keep needing to reassure myself by looking at my notes that it is the right adjective ending, or that it is definitly "ist" and not "hat" gefahren in this sense. And I am so scared that it will give me a word and I won't know what gender it is...then what?! Gah! My brain won't close down for me to be able to sleep, I have tried and my brain just keeps going over and over information.

    I may just have one quick listen to something German before I sleep, but I won't stress myself out over reading something as I know I am far too tired to understand it now!
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    I am going to fail. Again. :sadnod:. I know the grammar rules, but looking at practise questions and I keep needing to reassure myself by looking at my notes that it is the right adjective ending, or that it is definitly "ist" and not "hat" gefahren in this sense. And I am so scared that it will give me a word and I won't know what gender it is...then what?! Gah! My brain won't close down for me to be able to sleep, I have tried and my brain just keeps going over and over information.

    I may just have one quick listen to something German before I sleep, but I won't stress myself out over reading something as I know I am far too tired to understand it now!
    I can't really help you with most of that, just relax and don't stress too much, exams are over-rated. One tip though if you don't already know, is that verbs that are related to personal motion or lack thereof, eg fahren, gehen, fliegen, stehen, liegen, sitzen (sometimes), can often be conjugated with "bin" in the past tense...it's not perfect, but it's a decent rule of thumb if you don't want to have to be thinking about whether a verb is transitive or not...
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    I am going to fail. Again. :sadnod:. I know the grammar rules, but looking at practise questions and I keep needing to reassure myself by looking at my notes that it is the right adjective ending, or that it is definitly "ist" and not "hat" gefahren in this sense.
    You use "sein" with verbs of motion and verbs of "change of state", and the few exceptions "sein" (itself), "werden" and "bleiben".

    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    And I am so scared that it will give me a word and I won't know what gender it is...then what?!
    Then you look for that word somewhere else and a clue to give you the gender. If you don't find one, you go for whatever sounds best, and be consistent. Same with adjective endings - if you really don't know, then guess (it's almost always -en), but be consistent with them. If you decide that in one particular case it should be -er, then make sure it's -er everywhere else in similar cases. At least then the examiner thinks "has learnt cases but made a mistake in doing so" rather than "is guessing random concatenations of letters".
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    Ja ich muss das auch machen.

    Ich wuensche alle viel Glueck bei den Pruefungen. Ich habe auch eine Hoerpruefung am morgen.
    My listening test ist am Donnerstag.
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    I've got my German exam on Tuesday - grammar, translating and writing! I passed my listening and speaking exams which I was really stressed about, I think I'd actually done enough work but I was letting the 'could have done more' thoughts get to me lol.

    I do have a stupid question though, when you have a conjunction like 'aber' or 'dann', does the pronoun or the verb come after?

    For example:

    'Wir sind ins Kino gegangen dann wir sind nach Hause gegangen' or would it be: 'Wir sind ins Kino gegangen dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen?'

    Or does it change depending on the conjunction? Thanks! x (and sorry if it's a stupid question lol)
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    (Original post by xJessx)
    I've got my German exam on Tuesday - grammar, translating and writing! I passed my listening and speaking exams which I was really stressed about, I think I'd actually done enough work but I was letting the 'could have done more' thoughts get to me lol.

    I do have a stupid question though, when you have a conjunction like 'aber' or 'dann', does the pronoun or the verb come after?

    For example:

    'Wir sind ins Kino gegangen dann wir sind nach Hause gegangen' or would it be: 'Wir sind ins Kino gegangen dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen?'

    Or does it change depending on the conjunction? Thanks! x (and sorry if it's a stupid question lol)
    Dann and aber never change the word order so your first example is right.
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    Dann and aber never change the word order so your first example is right.
    Is it just weil, obwohl and wenn that change the order then? Thanks for the reply =)
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    (Original post by xJessx)
    Is it just weil, obwohl and wenn that change the order then? Thanks for the reply =)
    There's more conjunctions than that but yeah. That's ok
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    There's more conjunctions than that but yeah. That's ok
    Ok, yeah maybe that's enough at my level lol. I don't want anymore yet.
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    (Original post by xJessx)
    Is it just weil, obwohl and wenn that change the order then? Thanks for the reply =)
    Those conjunctions kick the verb to the end of the clause though.

    I always would say "Wir sind ins Kino gegangen, dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen.
    It sounds more natural to me...
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    Actually it's dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen.
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Actually it's dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen.
    I think I love you Fleece...
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    (Original post by wannabe mexican)
    I think I love you Fleece...
    Oh good
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    Dann and aber never change the word order so your first example is right.
    No, that's "denn". :smile:

    (Original post by xJessx)
    Or does it change depending on the conjunction? Thanks! x (and sorry if it's a stupid question lol)
    Certainly does. There are two main types:

    - coordinating conjunctions: aber, denn, oder, und, sondern, etc. These don't affect the word order at all: "...aber wir sind nach Hause gegangen".
    - subordinating conjunctions: da, weil, wenn, obwohl, seit, sobald, damit, bis, bevor, während, als, etc. These send the verb to the end: "obwohl wir nach Hause gegangen sind".

    Note that I haven't listed "dann" here at all. That's because "dann" isn't a conjunction, it's an adverb; you can say "we went to town then (= dann = at that time)", but you can't say "we went to town although", because it doesn't make sense. Alternatively, just notice that "wir sind ins Kino gegangen" and "dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen" are two perfectly fully functioning sentences in their own right, and you've just put them together with a comma between them. So your sentence is missing a conjunction, and should read something like "wir sind ins Kino gegangen, und/aber (...which don't affect the word order, so we're expecting a "verb second" thing to happen here...) dann sind wir nach Hause gegangen". Note that, of course, you could've written something else like "wir sind ins Kino gegangen, und wir sind dann nach Hause gegangen", provided the verb "sind" stays in second position after the "und".

    Other adverbs you might like to use which behave in this way include: dann, danach, deswegen, deshalb, jetzt, da (= dort), hier, manchmal, etc. You just happened to pick one that sounded like a conjunction, but it's not a conjunction even in English, it's just often colloquially (and rather sloppily) used to link clauses together.
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    Bloed, ich vermisse Deutschland! Ich will diese (i dunno what case this would be ) Sommer noch zweimal da fahren, aber ich habe bis jetzt keinen Plaene (plans?). Wenn Friederike wird in London bleiben, kann ich nicht fahren :/

    Billy, one thing you said which confused me.

    (Original post by generalebriety)
    - coordinating conjunctions: aber, denn, oder, und, sondern, etc. These don't affect the word order at all: "...aber wir sind nach Hause gegangen".
    Doesn't aber start a new clause, hence the verb second rule? I'd expect "bla bla bla, aber sind wirnach Hause gegangen".
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    No, that's "denn". :smile:
    Note to self. Don't type when stressed off my head because I will make typos and write the wrong thing.

    No idea how I'm gonna pass this exam today because I'm worried about other things.
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Bloed, ich vermisse Deutschland! Ich will diese (i dunno what case this would be ) Sommer noch einmal (again = noch einmal, unless you do mean you want to fly there twice more) dahin fahren, aber ich habe bis jetzt keine Plaene (plans?). Wenn Friederike in London bleiben wird (or just "bleibt"), kann ich nicht fahren :/
    Diesen Sommer - phrases of time "at which" something happens are typically in the accusative (letzten Sommer, dieses Jahr, nächstes Mal, etc.) unless you're talking about a deliberately unspecified time, in which case it's genitive (eines Tages, eines Morgens, etc... bizarrely also eines Nachts, as an exception).

    "Pläne" is fine.

    Warum kannst du nicht dahin fahren, wenn sie hier ist? Meinst du, dass du dahin fahren und dann bei ihr bleiben willst, was du natürlich nicht machen kannst, wenn sie nicht da ist?

    (Original post by wtid)
    Doesn't aber start a new clause, hence the verb second rule? I'd expect "bla bla bla, aber sind wirnach Hause gegangen".
    All conjunctions start a new clause (conjunctions are defined as the part of speech that connect two separate clauses), but to my mind none of them behave like that. Certainly "aber" doesn't, it would definitely be "aber wir sind nach Hause gegangen". :smile:
 
 
 
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