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    (Original post by jet'aime)
    Excalibur, ich habe auch Angst! Welches Fach würdest du in Universität studieren? Hast du das Datum und die Uhrzeit deines Cambridgebewerbungsgesprächs (lol Bewerbungsgesprächs von Cambridge :rolleyes:) bekommen?
    Ich möchte Naturwissenschaften studieren, besonders Biologie/Biochemie. Ich habe mein Datum/meine Uhrzeit noch nicht bekommt, weil ich gerade heute mein "Supplementary Application Questionnaire" geschickt habe! Nach der Website ist es offensichtlich am 3/4/5 Dezember. :eek: zu bald

    Und du? Worum hast du dich beworben und bei welche College?
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    (Original post by Excalibur)
    Wenn du es nicht schon bemerkt hast, bin ich ich kein optimistischer Mensch Ich habe Angst vor meinem Interview
    Also ich werde dir jedenfalls die Daumen drücken und ein paar positive Gedanken schicken.
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    can somebody please explain the difference between:
    a) sie sprachen oft uber jim als ob er etwas hassliches wäre
    b) sie sprachen oft uber jim als ob er etwas hassliches sei

    are both a) and b) acceptable?
    when would a) be used instead of b) and vice versa?

    ta!
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    (Original post by 1361)
    can somebody please explain the difference between:
    a) sie sprachen oft uber jim als ob er etwas hassliches wäre
    b) sie sprachen oft uber jim als ob er etwas hassliches sei

    are both a) and b) acceptable?
    when would a) be used instead of b) and vice versa?

    ta!
    They're both grammatically correct. I'd say a) implies that Jim isn't in fact ugly ('wäre' is Konjunktiv II, so it's not "real"), whereas in b) he may or may not be ugly and it's the other people's talk that is being stressed.

    Both sentences sound a bit weird in German, by the way... You wouldn't really say "etwas häßliches" when referring to a person.
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    thanks a lot hobnob!.
    could you give an explanation as to why 'sei' would emphasise or stress the peeples' talk?
    x
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    (Original post by 1361)
    thanks a lot hobnob!.
    could you give an explanation as to why 'sei' would emphasise or stress the peeples' talk?
    x
    Because Konjunktiv II is more hypothetical than Konjunktiv I; that is, when you use KI ('sei') there's less of a conditional element / less doubt than there is when you use KII ('wäre'). Compare:
    "They often talked about Jim as if he's ugly." (sei)
    "They often talked about Jim as if he was ugly." (wäre)

    The first is neutral, but the second strongly implies that he's not ugly.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Because Konjunktiv II is more hypothetical than Konjunktiv I; that is, when you use KI ('sei') there's less of a conditional element / less doubt than there is when you use KII ('wäre'). Compare:
    "They often talked about Jim as if he's ugly." (sei)
    "They often talked about Jim as if he was ugly." (wäre)

    The first is neutral, but the second strongly implies that he's not ugly.
    Precisely - although strictly speaking, shouldn't it be "were" rather than "was"?:p:
    The Konjunktiv I form is also identical to the one you'd use for neutral reported speech (i.e. "sie sagten, daß er häßlich sei"), and you might argue that in your example, the "sei" has a similar function, because it reports an opinion that isn't necessarily the speaker's own. So basically the sentence focuses on the facts that a) people talk about Jim and that b) they consider him ugly, but ignores the question of whether Jim's ugliness is actual or supposed.

    Sorry, I'm not very good at explaining things at this time of the day... Does this remotely make sense?
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Precisely - although strictly speaking, shouldn't it be "were" rather than "was"?:p:
    Yes, strictly speaking, but I think since that's rarely used it wouldn't serve to highlight the difference as well. Are we doing English grammar or German here...?

    I think your explanation makes sense, but I can't really give you a neutral point of view on that, since I know what you're saying before you've said it, more or less.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    I think your explanation makes sense, but I can't really give you a neutral point of view on that, since I know what you're saying before you've said it, more or less.
    You know, that sounds very disturbing somehow. As though you were tapping my brain or something like that...
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    thanks everyone
    hmm it seems that wäre would be used to imply that it isn't the case and sei to create an element of sympathy.. agreed?
    :tsr2:
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    (Original post by 1361)
    thanks everyone
    hmm it seems that wäre would be used to imply that it isn't the case and sei to create an element of sympathy.. agreed?
    :tsr2:
    Hmm, no, I wouldn't say it creates an element of sympathy, really. If anything it's the more factual of the two, because it doesn't imply a judgement on the part of the speaker.
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    (Original post by 1361)
    thanks everyone
    hmm it seems that wäre would be used to imply that it isn't the case and sei to create an element of sympathy.. agreed?
    :tsr2:
    Not at all. "Sei" (or, in general, Konjunktiv I) just implies the speaker isn't giving their own opinion. Their own opinion might be the same or different, they're just not mentioning it, hinting at it or implying it. It's essentially reported speech. Nothing to do with sympathy; 'hässlich' could be replaced by any adjective, in fact the whole sentence structure could be changed and it'd have the same connotation.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Not at all. "Sei" (or, in general, Konjunktiv I) just implies the speaker isn't giving their own opinion. Their own opinion might be the same or different, they're just not mentioning it, hinting at it or implying it. It's essentially reported speech. Nothing to do with sympathy; 'hässlich' could be replaced by any adjective, in fact the whole sentence structure could be changed and it'd have the same connotation.
    Yep, nice and clear explanation there, as always.:yy:
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    Ich bin "cases" jetzt lernen aber was ist "arbeit" in "ich bin bei meine Arbeit"?

    Ich glaube ich muss es wissen (I'm struggling here with no help!) so...I'll move to English, I can't do it alone.

    I think I need to know it so I know whether to put "meine" or "meinem", correct? "Work" would be the direct object right? So according to my book, a female direct object continues to be "meine", I think (crosses fingers). Actually, does it even need to be "I am at my work" or simply as in English "I am at work"?

    Sorry, this is just my random thoughts put down on "paper", I hope it makes sense, I don't have much time since my dinner hour is almost over! Thanks for any help!
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Ich bin "cases" jetzt lernen aber was ist "arbeit" in "ich bin bei meine Arbeit"?

    Ich glaube ich muss es wissen (I'm struggling here with no help!) so...I'll move to English, I can't do it alone.

    I think I need to know it so I know whether to put "meine" or "meinem", correct? "Work" would be the direct object right? So according to my book, a female direct object continues to be "meine", I think (crosses fingers). Actually, does it even need to be "I am at my work" or simply as in English "I am at work"?

    Sorry, this is just my random thoughts put down on "paper", I hope it makes sense, I don't have much time since my dinner hour is almost over! Thanks for any help!
    Usually you'd say "Ich bin bei der Arbeit" (or "auf Arbeit", if you want a working-class touch - although that consequently doesn't really work for office jobs etc.). If you wanted to emphasise the fact that you're at your workplace rather than the fact that you're working, you'd say "Ich bin an meinem Arbeitsplatz".
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Ich bin "cases" jetzt lernen aber was ist "arbeit" in "ich bin bei meine Arbeit"?
    This should be "Ich lerne gerade...". You never say "ich bin + infinitive" for "I am (do)ing...", it's always just the normal present tense, and "gerade" is "at the moment" / "right now". "Ich lerne gerade die Fälle (=cases)."

    "Arbeit" in this context should be in the dative, because "bei" always takes the dative. (I think I put a page up on the TSR wiki under German revision notes about prepositions, go find. ) So yes, "meinem" is right in case, but not in gender, because "meinem" agrees with masculine and neuter nouns. You want the feminine equivalent of "meinem", which is "meiner".

    (Original post by wtid)
    Actually, does it even need to be "I am at my work" or simply as in English "I am at work"?
    Ich bin bei meiner Arbeit = I am at my work (though this sounds odd). Ich bin bei der (again, feminine dative form - notice the endings of 'der' and 'meiner' are the same!) Arbeit = I am at work.
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    Fur einige wochen, habe ich diese Webseite gesehen, und ich glaube dass habe ich so viel zu lernen... Ich habe vor funf Jahren angefangen, Deutsch zu lernen, und ich mochte zu fortsetzen, und besser werden!

    Bitte korigieren meinen Fehler... By the way how do I get the umlauts up on here? Me and technology...katastrophal..:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Willand)
    Fur einige [1] wochen, habe ich diese Webseite gesehen, und ich glaube dass habe ich [2] so viel zu lernen... Ich habe vor funf Jahren angefangen, Deutsch zu lernen, und ich mochte zu fortsetzen [3], und besser werden!

    Bitte korigieren [4] meinen [5] Fehler... By the way how do I get the umlauts up on here? Me and technology...katastrophal..:rolleyes:
    [1] Vor einigen Wochen - 'vor' means 'ago', and it takes the dative. Dative plurals always(ish) have an -n on the end of them.
    [2] "Dass" always follows a comma and sends the next main verb to the end: "Ich glaube, dass ich so viel zu lernen habe". (Better would be 'sehr viel'.)
    [3] No "zu" after a modal verb: "ich möchte es fortsetzen" (the 'es' is there because you can't just say "I would like to continue", you have to continue something. Alternatively, "ich möchte fortfahren".
    [4] Korrigiert - "ihr" form. You've misspelt this and put it into the infinitive. (If you were attempting to use the "Sie" form, it'd be "korrigieren Sie".)
    [5] Meine - plural.

    Umlauts - you could use character map or something?
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    (Original post by Willand)
    Fur einige wochen, habe ich diese Webseite gesehen, und ich glaube dass habe ich so viel zu lernen... Ich habe vor funf Jahren angefangen, Deutsch zu lernen, und ich mochte zu fortsetzen, und besser werden!

    Bitte korigieren meinen Fehler... By the way how do I get the umlauts up on here? Me and technology...katastrophal..:rolleyes:
    For umlauts on the English keyboard I do the following (it sounds overcomplicated at first but it's very simple). First do ctrl+; then let go of both and press your vowel.

    Oh wait, I've just remembered that only works on msn messenger and yahoo messenger (maybe others too, I haven't tried) but not on web browsers...strange that. As Generalebriety said, character map it is then, although I usually type them in an open msn window and copy/paste, it's quicker for me.
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    (Original post by wtid)
    For umlauts on the English keyboard I do the following (it sounds overcomplicated at first but it's very simple). First do ctrl+; then let go of both and press your vowel.

    Oh wait, I've just remembered that only works on msn messenger and yahoo messenger (maybe others too, I haven't tried) but not on web browsers...strange that. As Generalebriety said, character map it is then, although I usually type them in an open msn window and copy/paste, it's quicker for me.
    Admittedly, I use the number pad, but since my laptop doesn't really have one it's really awkward to use so I often can't be bothered with it.

    (Alt + 0228 = ae, alt + 0246 = oe, alt + 0252 = ue, alt + 0223 = ss.)
 
 
 
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