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    (Original post by littleshambles)
    Achso. : Dann weiß ich nicht, wer ich glaubte, du wärst. :p: "yob" wird auf russisch "ёб" geschrieben. Die Wort bedeutet "******". Weil das nichts nützen wird (swear filter ), denke ich, dass man auf Deutsch "gefickt" sagen kann.
    :mmm:
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    Damit, Davon, dazu etc...all these "da" words are annoying me...I keep forgetting what they mean, and I keep seeing new ones pop up all the time, and I keep seeing them used in difference contexts..
    ...is there someone out there that can explain them to me pleassseee?
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    Ugh, I've just written something amazing out and then wanted to write ö, but I didn't have num lock on :moon:.

    So 'da+prep' is used when a noun isn't. So for example:
    'Der Film geht um eine Frau, die einen Zeitreisender getroffen hat'
    and if a noun wasn't used then 'darum' would be used.

    There are also certain words which just fit with a sentence, "Möchtest du nich eine Eisügel dazu' (do you want another scoop of ice cream with it)
    or 'Ich habe kein Geld dabei' (I don't have any money with me).
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    There's a page that explains this really well http://www.canoo.net/services/Online...MenuId=Word427 Click also on "form" and "function". If the page is in German you can go to the homepage and swap to English.

    They are called pronominal adverbs. We have them in English too :king1: although we generally don't use them in the same way (I find it really helpful to think of them like that though because it is quite a simple and familiar concept when you think about it). You can also have wo+adverb, (womit = with what/which; wofür = for what ["Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" ]) and hier+adverb (hiermit = herewith, in saying this, hereby). I don't really get the hier- ones though tbh.
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    (Original post by littleshambles)
    Do you say "Job" "job" or "yob"? Cos the latter would be funny (it's a very bad Russian swearword.)
    The Germans pronounce it as they would attempt to pronounce the word "job" in English but with a German accent, i.e. a bit more like "chop".
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    Ugh, I've just written something amazing out and then wanted to write ö, but I didn't have num lock on :moon:.

    So 'da+prep' is used when a noun isn't. So for example:
    'Der Film geht um eine Frau, die einen Zeitreisender getroffen hat'
    and if a noun wasn't used then 'darum' would be used.


    There are also certain words which just fit with a sentence, "Möchtest du nich eine Eisügel dazu' (do you want another scoop of ice cream with it)
    or 'Ich habe kein Geld dabei' (I don't have any money with me).
    Where would the 'darum' go in that sentence?

    Yeah..like when I say to people..what do you think about it? I say...was sagst du dazu? I have no idea why the dazu is there..I imagine its something like..what say you to it...or something like that..

    Ha..when I say..ich bin dabei..I know it means something like..yeah im in!..but I have no idea why dabei is used there lol

    (Original post by littleshambles)
    There's a page that explains this really well http://www.canoo.net/services/Online...MenuId=Word427 Click also on "form" and "function". If the page is in German you can go to the homepage and swap to English.

    They are called pronominal adverbs. We have them in English too :king1: although we generally don't use them in the same way (I find it really helpful to think of them like that though because it is quite a simple and familiar concept when you think about it). You can also have wo+adverb, (womit = with what/which; wofür = for what ["Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" ]) and hier+adverb (hiermit = herewith, in saying this, hereby). I don't really get the hier- ones though tbh.
    Thank you for the site!

    And I never heard of hiermit before..so thats something new haha..never learnt this at Uni!... I havent learnt so many things at Uni...gee :/
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    Ich bin dabei, bist du dabei, bin ich dabei, uns zu verlieren? :moon:

    I think the "dabei" thing is sort of figurative in that when you say bei you're on or at or with someone or something (the TV, someone['s house]). So you're "bei" the thing that you're talking about, like the idea for a party or whatever. And dazu is the same sort of principle. "what do you say to that?" --> "What do you say thereto?"

    Does anyone else love the words "bei", "dabei" incidentally? I think they're so cute. :heart: Also I think I get what the difference is between the "hier" and "da" ones. I suppose it's that the da- ones refer to something already mentioned previously, or something about which you are talking, but the hier- ones refer to something that you're doing or saying or is being done right now.

    The only example of hier- that I know is "Ich bin eher der Meinung, dass ich hiermit nicht allein bin" (sorry Billy ), and hiermit means with the stuff that he's saying right now. So it's more like "with this" than "with that/it" (damit).

    At least that is my possibly way off thinking.

    Spoiler:
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    Like in English when you say "I hereby pronounce you man and wife" [in doing the ceremony that I am performing right now] or "in the hereafter" [the hereafter being the afterlife which is after life, which is right now]. Also in formal letters "here-" adverbs are used a lot to refer to the entire letter, but "there-" adverbs might refer to some particular clause or thing that it is talking about. :holmes:
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    Ich fahre am Freitag nach München :teeth:. Ich in noch nie da gewesen! :woo:
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    Meine Freunde sind jetzt für ein Haus am Suchen. Ich will mit ihnen gehen. Sie werden vielleicht etwas total schrecklich finden. Und ICH werde dafür aufkommen müssen. Wir haben noch ein Haus, das perfekt gut ist!!! Wenn wir das wegen ihnen verlieren, hoffe ich, dass die neue Häuser sehr gut sind, oder...

    Edit: Haha, die haben ein Haus gefunden, das PERFEKT ist. Ich liebe sie.
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    (Original post by littleshambles)
    Do you say "Job" "job" or "yob"? Cos the latter would be funny (it's a very bad Russian swearword.)
    Actually most Germans pronounce it closer to 'chop'.:p: Voiced consonants at the end of words don't exist in German, so when they occur in foreign words, a lot of people will pronounce them voiceless without even realising it.
    Which is also why an awful lot of German journalists are now talking about recent events at the 'Laugh Parade'.
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    Oh, I thought they were saying "Lauf Parade'
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    (Original post by littleshambles)
    Ich bin dabei, bist du dabei, bin ich dabei, uns zu verlieren? :moon:

    I think the "dabei" thing is sort of figurative in that when you say bei you're on or at or with someone or something (the TV, someone['s house]). So you're "bei" the thing that you're talking about, like the idea for a party or whatever. And dazu is the same sort of principle. "what do you say to that?" --> "What do you say thereto?"

    Does anyone else love the words "bei", "dabei" incidentally? I think they're so cute. :heart: Also I think I get what the difference is between the "hier" and "da" ones. I suppose it's that the da- ones refer to something already mentioned previously, or something about which you are talking, but the hier- ones refer to something that you're doing or saying or is being done right now.

    The only example of hier- that I know is "Ich bin eher der Meinung, dass ich hiermit nicht allein bin" (sorry Billy ), and hiermit means with the stuff that he's saying right now. So it's more like "with this" than "with that/it" (damit).

    At least that is my possibly way off thinking.

    Spoiler:
    Show

    Like in English when you say "I hereby pronounce you man and wife" [in doing the ceremony that I am performing right now] or "in the hereafter" [the hereafter being the afterlife which is after life, which is right now]. Also in formal letters "here-" adverbs are used a lot to refer to the entire letter, but "there-" adverbs might refer to some particular clause or thing that it is talking about. :holmes:
    Achoo...naja, I understand it more now :P

    Aber es ist noch ein bisschen verwirrend für mich!! haha ich muss diese Wörter mehr üben :P
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    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Achoo...naja, I understand it more now :P

    Aber es ist noch ein bisschen verwirrend für mich!! haha ich muss diese Wörter mehr üben :P
    Haha, naja ich muss noch ja die ganze Sprache üben!

    (Aber ich werde viele Zeit dafür haben, weil meine neue Wohnung so teuer ist, und ich kein Geld habe. Lange Abende zuhause mit meinen Bücher...)
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Actually most Germans pronounce it closer to 'chop'.:p: Voiced consonants at the end of words don't exist in German, so when they occur in foreign words, a lot of people will pronounce them voiceless without even realising it.
    Which is also why an awful lot of German journalists are now talking about recent events at the 'Laugh Parade'.
    Youtube video?
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    (Original post by littleshambles)
    Youtube video?
    Can't help you there, sorry - I mostly heard it on the radio. But some speakers definitely said 'laugh'.
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    Hey...does anyone know what "Rigipswaende" is?
    I guess that because of "Waende" it has something to do with walls...but Rigips?...totally lost on that one...
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    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Hey...does anyone know what "Rigipswaende" is?
    I guess that because of "Waende" it has something to do with walls...but Rigips?...totally lost on that one...
    It's a building material. Essentially it's thin sheets of plaster - dreadful at keeping out noise. The kind of thing you'd use to build a cheap prefabricated house.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    It's a building material. Essentially it's thin sheets of plaster - dreadful at keeping out noise. The kind of thing you'd use to build a cheap prefabricated house.
    :lolwut:
    No wonder my halls is so cheap....
    scheisse......what a way to make me think twice about bringing girls home


    Ah..und was ist die Unterschied zwischen sowie und und?
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    Hmmmm does it matter which gender I use with "Gleiche"? I thought I kept hearing different genders and looking on dict.cc to see what it actually was, it gives me both die and der and then in sentences there are things like auf das Gleiche hinauskommen. Are they interchangeable or is there actually a usage rule?
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    Hmmmm does it matter which gender I use with "Gleiche"? I thought I kept hearing different genders and looking on dict.cc to see what it actually was, it gives me both die and der and then in sentences there are things like auf das Gleiche hinauskommen. Are they interchangeable or is there actually a usage rule?
    It's an adjective, so should agree with the noun it is describing. "Das Gleiche" is an adjectival noun meaning "the same thing".
 
 
 
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