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    (Original post by Misreadable)
    Got a question for anyone who's done AS German.

    Do you know if I will lose marks for not using the German Speech Marks. Hopefully I won't forget them but is there a chance of losing marks for a silly mistake?

    Danke, in advance
    Course you won't lose marks, no.
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    Can someone please point out what is wrong with this sentence grammatically:

    Leider scheint es, dass es nicht nur politische Befugnis fehlt, sondern auch konzentriert es sich allzu viel auf auffallende Probleme wie Gewalt in Videospielen.

    I've been told that I've got a subordinating clause wrong, but I just can't see it..?

    Trying to say 'Unfortunately it seems that it not only lacks political authority but also it focuses too much on obvious problems such as violence in video games.'

    Also when one says 'Young women are encouraged to read...' would 'ermutigt' be correct or would it be 'ermutigen'?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    I'm not a Herr, actually.
    You're female?! Wow, strange how one just assumes. You never even gave any hint that you were male, yet still I thought so, wonder why. Sorry though
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    (Original post by Shane-O)
    Can someone please point out what is wrong with this sentence grammatically:

    Leider scheint es, dass es nicht nur politische Befugnis fehlt, sondern auch konzentriert es sich allzu viel auf auffallende Probleme wie Gewalt in Videospielen.

    I've been told that I've got a subordinating clause wrong, but I just can't see it..?
    The word order is wrong. It should be "... sondern es konzentriert sich auch...".

    Also when one says 'Young women are encouraged to read...' would 'ermutigt' be correct or would it be 'ermutigen'?
    "... werden ermutigt". It's a participle.
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    (Original post by wtid)
    You're female?! Wow, strange how one just assumes. You never even gave any hint that you were male, yet still I thought so, wonder why. Sorry though
    No problem. I always assumed the highlighted 'Elizabeth' in my avatar would make it sort of obvious, but apparently it doesn't.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    No problem. I always assumed the highlighted 'Elizabeth' in my avatar would make it sort of obvious, but apparently it doesn't.
    Your name's Elizabeth!?

    Revelations! :p:

    (Original post by hobnob)
    The word order is wrong. It should be "... sondern es konzentriert sich auch...".
    Of course, this comes with my usual disclaimer of "you're the German, not me, I might be talking crap"... but to me it sounds better to say "sondern dass es sich auch ... konzentriert".
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    No problem. I always assumed the highlighted 'Elizabeth' in my avatar would make it sort of obvious, but apparently it doesn't.
    ...or perhaps I'm not perceptive enough to notice? I wondered about it (the highlighted "Elizabeth") and even considered it and still disregarded it - silly me!
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    Hi, i'm new and i'm just about to start learning German in my college's night class next month. . I just think this is a great thread.
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    (Original post by SS_Imperator)
    Hi, i'm new and i'm just about to start learning German in my college's night class next month. . I just think this is a great thread.
    Hello there, welcome to the society.

    (I do like it when new members post in here... it reminds me that, as usual, I've forgotten to check and approve the join requests. :p:)
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    Hallo und wilkommen! Du wirst bald besser als mich sein, wenn du Unterricht hast! Ich bin nur ein Anfänger.
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Hallo und wilkommen! Du wirst bald besser als mich sein, wenn du Unterricht hast! Ich bin nur ein Anfänger.
    Thanks
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    Guys, for my cwk:

    Is candidate Number - Kandidatnummer or Kandidatzahl or something else?

    and school number, is that Schulenummer or..?

    Bit silly I know but one of those that makes me go

    cheers
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Your name's Elizabeth!?

    Revelations! :p:
    Elisabeth, actually, but I'm used to people spelling it wrong.:p:

    Of course, this comes with my usual disclaimer of "you're the German, not me, I might be talking crap"... but to me it sounds better to say "sondern dass es sich auch ... konzentriert".
    Ahem. You're right, actually. I didn't see the 'dass' for some reason (perhaps because I was puzzling over what the sentence might actually mean).
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Hallo und wilkommen! Du wirst bald besser als ich sein, wenn du Unterricht hast! Ich bin nur ein Anfänger.
    In German it's always "better than I" - no alternative way of putting it.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    In German it's always "better than I" - no alternative way of putting it.
    Danke! Is there a rule for that or is it just in this instance? For example: she was quicker than me = she was quicker than I?

    Also (and this may be the same in English, but since I haven't touched English grammar since primary school, I haven't a clue on the rules!) how do you say "I need it bound" (like binding a book). As far as I can conclude, "bound" is the past tense of "to bind", so that would lead me to think the sentence needs to end in gebunden. That, however, would make the sentence past tense, wouldn't it? So do you simply use the past tense form but in a present tense sentence or what? "Ich brauche es gebunden"

    ...or is it something very simple and i'm overlooking it and not thinkins since it's still only 8:40am and I'm tired? :p:
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Danke! Is there a rule for that or is it just in this instance? For example: she was quicker than me = she was quicker than I?
    It's a general rule. In German it's always "than I". That's because comparisons need a nominative, and you can't use "mich" to refer to yourself in the nominative (unlike "me").

    Also (and this may be the same in English, but since I haven't touched English grammar since primary school, I haven't a clue on the rules!) how do you say "I need it bound" (like binding a book). As far as I can conclude, "bound" is the past tense of "to bind", so that would lead me to think the sentence needs to end in gebunden. That, however, would make the sentence past tense, wouldn't it? So do you simply use the past tense form but in a present tense sentence or what? "Ich brauche es gebunden"

    ...or is it something very simple and i'm overlooking it and not thinkins since it's still only 8:40am and I'm tired? :p:
    OK, this one's a bit complicated to explain, so do tell me if I'm not making sense:
    1. "bound" in "I need it bound" isn't actually the past tense, it's the past participle; it looks the same as the past tense, but the past participle is used to form a number of composite forms, including the present or past perfect (I have/had bound) but also passive forms (he is/was bound).
    2. Now, what you need in this case is clearly a passive, so grammatically speaking you're correct. The past participle of "binden" is indeed "gebunden" (the simple past is "band", by the way), so literally, "I need it bound" does mean "ich brauche es gebunden".
    3. However, the construction you used in your sentence doesn't exist in German, unfortunately, so you'd need to phrase it differently. In this particular example you'd probably say something like "Ich muss es binden lassen" (literally: "I must let it be bound").
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    It's a general rule. In German it's always "than I". That's because comparisons need a nominative, and you can't use "mich" to refer to yourself in the nominative (unlike "me").


    OK, this one's a bit complicated to explain, so do tell me if I'm not making sense:
    1. "bound" in "I need it bound" isn't actually the past tense, it's the past participle; it looks the same as the past tense, but the past participle is used to form a number of composite forms, including the present or past perfect (I have/had bound) but also passive forms (he is/was bound).
    2. Now, what you need in this case is clearly a passive, so grammatically speaking you're correct. The past participle of "binden" is indeed "gebunden" (the simple past is "band", by the way), so literally, "I need it bound" does mean "ich brauche es gebunden".
    3. However, the construction you used in your sentence doesn't exist in German, unfortunately, so you'd need to phrase it differently. In this particular example you'd probably say something like "Ich muss es binden lassen" (literally: "I must let it be bound").
    Danke So similarly, it would (hopefully) be "Ich muss es [wound up] lassen? (I didn't know which word to use for "wound" as it can also mean a wound in the sense of an injury)
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Danke So similarly, it would (hopefully) be "Ich muss es [wound up] lassen? (I didn't know which word to use for "wound" as it can also mean a wound in the sense of an injury)
    Yes, exactly. Obviously the word you'd use would depend on the context, but basically "to have something done" (which is basically the construction behind 'I need it bound', really) = "etwas machen lassen" (As in: "He has his hair cut" = "Er lässt sich die Haare schneiden".)
    Note that you'd use the infinitive, though, so it would really be "Ich muss es [wind up] lassen".
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Danke! Is there a rule for that or is it just in this instance? For example: she was quicker than me = she was quicker than I?
    Think about what the sentence really means by putting the verb back in: "she was quicker than I was" = "sie war schneller als ich".

    But now compare these two sentences (the English translation is correct for both, but ambiguous):
    "she helped you more than me" - "sie hat dir mehr als ich geholfen"
    "she helped you more than me" - "sie hat dir mehr als mir geholfen"
    Any clues as to what they might mean? Think about the case that both of those words take before clicking the spoiler.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    "sie hat dir mehr als ich geholfen" - "she helped you more than I did"
    "sie hat dir mehr als mir geholfen" - "she helped you more than she helped me"

    Do you see why? In the first sentence, it's "she helped more than I helped", so "sie" and "ich" both must be the subject (and hence nominative). In the second sentence, it's "she helped you more than she helped me", so "you" and "me" must both be the object (and hence dative).

    Another example using the accusative: "er hat dich öfter als ich / mich angerufen" - "he phoned you more often than I did / than he phoned me", both of which can be reduced to "he phoned you more often than me in English". Why is each of "ich" and "mich" used in the above two sentences?


    If you're stuck, try putting the verb back in and seeing what happens in these types of sentences.
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    Isn't "than I" equally acceptable (if used a bit more rarely nowadays)?:confused:

    By the way, the word order in those two German sentences isn't actually wrong, but it's not what you'd normally say. You'd say "sie hat dir mehr geholfen als ich/mir". Don't ask me why that's the preferred word order - after all it isn't as though German had a problem with putting the verb at the end of the sentence - but I think it has something to do with wanting to move the "... als X" bit further down the sentence to emphasise the opposition. That's pure speculation on my part, though, so it may well be wrong.:p:
 
 
 
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