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German learners' society watch

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    (Original post by dream123)
    'The student is the teacher.' is that correct translation?
    Well, werden can be use for "to become" so, the student becomes the teacher!

    I say this because I'm a beginner myself and seem to be asking lots of questions, but now I can finally help! (OK I'm still not very good so don't look to me for TOO much help :p:)
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Well, werden can be use for "to become" so, the student becomes the teacher!

    I say this because I'm a beginner myself and seem to be asking lots of questions, but now I can finally help! (OK I'm still not very good so don't look to me for TOO much help :p:)
    that is good! keep up the good work! :clap2:
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    I'm a she not a he.
    Of course you are. For some reason I thought he/she was responding to generalebriety, though...
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Isn't it also acceptable to ask "Was heißt du? / was heisßen Sie?"? Or is that just used for asking the names of objects in another languager? For example if I talk to my girlfriends mum and want to ask what "table" is in German, I just point to the table and ask "was heißt das auf Deutsch". (Actually I'm not sure if that's right either, but I'm sure she says the same to me, replacing Deutsch with Englisch).
    That should be "Wie heißt du / heißen Sie?".
    By the way, it's also "Wie (rather than 'was') ist Ihr Name?" for some reason. I don't know exactly why, but I suppose it'll be because "ist" is more or less acting as a stand-in for "lautet".:dontknow:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    By the way, it's also "Wie (rather than 'was') ist Ihr Name?" for some reason. I don't know exactly why, but I suppose it'll be because "ist" is more or less acting as a stand-in for "lautet".:dontknow:
    Hmm. I wasn't sure if that was compulsory or just a stylistic thing.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    That should be "Wie heißt du / heißen Sie?".
    By the way, it's also "Wie (rather than 'was') ist Ihr Name?" for some reason. I don't know exactly why, but I suppose it'll be because "ist" is more or less acting as a stand-in for "lautet".:dontknow:
    Of course it's wie, doh!. I just wasn't thinking properly
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Hmm. I wasn't sure if that was compulsory or just a stylistic thing.
    Well, to be fair, you could get away with saying "was" nowadays, but I'm fairly sure it's an anglicism and "wie" is the "correct" form. Not that it matters, really...
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    you'd get your point across if you said "was heißt du?" but it's just stylistically better to say "Wie heißt du?"

    do you think "was heißt du?" would be marked as a mistake in an exam?
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    (Original post by Spryte)
    you'd get your point across if you said "was heißt du?" but it's just stylistically better to say "Wie heißt du?"

    do you think "was heißt du?" would be marked as a mistake in an exam?
    A minor one, yeah, probably.
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    Yes, definitely. It's grammatically wrong, just like asking "How is your name?" would be grammatically wrong.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Yes, definitely. It's grammatically wrong, just like asking "How is your name?" would be grammatically wrong.
    "My name is fine thanks, bit tired but generally fine". See, it does work
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Yes, definitely. It's grammatically wrong, just like asking "How is your name?" would be grammatically wrong.
    Haha, I've started saying things like that shamefully.."and how is that called?" GAH. Looking forward to England and Englishness.
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Haha, I've started saying things like that shamefully.."and how is that called?" GAH. Looking forward to England and Englishness.
    Heh. Du lernst bestimmt bald, von der deutschen Gehirnhälfte auf die englische umzuschalten (und umgekehrt). Das erleichtert die Sache dann etwas.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Heh. Du lernst bestimmt bald, von der deutschen Gehirnhälfte auf die englische umzuschalten (und umgekehrt). Das erleichtert die Sache dann etwas.
    Naja, hoffentlich nach ein paar Tagen in England werde ich mit meiner eigenen Sprache klarkommen
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    Mir ist langeweilig! Meine Arbeit ist sheiße! Wir haben eine Liste von "URLs"/Wohnsitze (addresses?)/Telefonnummere und ich muss wenn sie sind richtig "check" (I didn't know the correct verb, and I'm sure the rest of the sentence is wrong anyway :p: naja!)
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Mir ist langeweilig[1]! Meine Arbeit ist sheiße[2]! Wir haben eine Liste von "URLs"/Wohnsitze (addresses?)/Telefonnummere[3] und ich muss wenn sie sind richtig "check"[4] (I didn't know the correct verb, and I'm sure the rest of the sentence is wrong anyway :p: naja!)
    [1] langweilig. The noun is Langeweile, but the adjective is langweilig.
    [2] Scheiße. Noun, so it should be capitalised, and don't forget the German spelling of the 'sh' sound is 'sch'.
    [3] Plural of Nummer is Nummer, but it needs an n in the dative: Nummern.
    [4] ich muss prüfen (= to check), ob sie richtig sind. Do you know about subordinate clauses yet? Well, this is one; 'ob' (whether) is a subordinating conjunction, meaning it starts a whole new clause ('whether they are right') and sends the verb to the end. The word you used, 'wenn', is also a subordinating conjunction, so grammatically you'd say '(main clause), wenn sie richtig sind'. However, 'wenn' means 'if' or 'when', not 'whether'. (We say 'if' informally to mean 'whether', but you can't use 'wenn' instead of 'ob'.)
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Mir ist langweilig! Meine Arbeit ist scheiße! Wir haben eine Liste von URLs/Adressen (yes, that's right - just one D)/Telefonnummern und ich muss überprüfen, ob sie stimmen.
    Ich friere hier im Moment wie ein Schneider. Selbst in York war es wärmer!
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    [1] langweilig. The noun is Langeweile, but the adjective is langweilig.
    [2] Scheiße. Noun, so it should be capitalised, and don't forget the German spelling of the 'sh' sound is 'sch'.
    [3] Plural of Nummer is Nummer, but it needs an n in the dative: Nummern.
    [4] ich muss prüfen (= to check), ob sie richtig sind. Do you know about subordinate clauses yet? Well, this is one; 'ob' (whether) is a subordinating conjunction, meaning it starts a whole new clause ('whether they are right') and sends the verb to the end. The word you used, 'wenn', is also a subordinating conjunction, so grammatically you'd say '(main clause), wenn sie richtig sind'. However, 'wenn' means 'if' or 'when', not 'whether'. (We say 'if' informally to mean 'whether', but you can't use 'wenn' instead of 'ob'.)
    Thanks I'm at work and didn't have my German book with me (and was in a rush hence the silly mistakes) so couldn't look up the words which introduce a subordinate clause. I need someone to practice German with on a daily basis - my girlfriend is too busy and won't speak "baby German" with me as she says it's too much effort :p: After Christmas when I'm not as busy any more I'm determined to start translating my book into German to get some practice!
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Thanks I'm at work and didn't have my German book with me (and was in a rush hence the silly mistakes) so couldn't look up the words which introduce a subordinate clause. I need someone to practice German with on a daily basis - my girlfriend is too busy and won't speak "baby German" with me as she says it's too much effort :p: After Christmas when I'm not as busy any more I'm determined to start translating my book into German to get some practice!
    Halo everyone
    Super! This sounds Sehr Gut.
    What sort of book is it?
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    (Original post by dream123)
    Halo everyone
    Super! This sounds Sehr Gut.
    What sort of book is it?
    Ein Kinder Buch!

    Something very simple I got from waterstones, it's aimed at children who have a vocab of over 75 words To be honest though, I think it would be too difficult for you, as you seem to be a beginner. Although the books did have different levels - level 1a may be your standard, I forgot what was in it, things like "the brown dog" etc, I seem to recall.
 
 
 
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