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    (Original post by Shane-O)
    Hallo! Can you/anyone tell me more of these German proverbial phrases/idioms. i would love to put them into some German essays!!
    You mean stuff like 'über einen Kamm scheren' = to tar with the same brush?:dontknow:
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    well, you know how the English have proverbs that don't quite make sense to foreigners like we saw earlier with 'killing two birds with one stone' or 'there's no point crying over spilt milk.'
    The Germans naturally, have similar sort of proverbial phrases which immediately make sense to any native but not to a foreigner.
    An important skill at A-Level is to make yourself sound 'less foreign' and including German proverbial phrases where appropriate, can really help in this capacity.
    My problem is that I only know one which is 'es geht bald vor die Hunde' or something along those lines, which I would obviously include in an essay when referring to something that went badly wrong or failed or something. Essentially, I want to know more so that I could perhaps include them in any other German essays I do.
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    (Original post by Shane-O)
    well, you know how the English have proverbs that don't quite make sense to foreigners like we saw earlier with 'killing two birds with one stone' or 'there's no point crying over spilt milk.'
    The Germans naturally, have similar sort of proverbial phrases which immediately make sense to any native but not to a foreigner.
    An important skill at A-Level is to make yourself sound 'less foreign' and including German proverbial phrases where appropriate, can really help in this capacity.
    My problem is that I only know one which is 'es geht bald vor die Hunde' or something along those lines, which I would obviously include in an essay when referring to something that went badly wrong or failed or something. Essentially, I want to know more so that I could perhaps include them in any other German essays I do.
    Can't you google it? Firstly, asking a native simply to list a load of idioms isn't particularly sensible, because I know I couldn't list 10 English idioms off the top of my head. Secondly, including too many of these in a German essay will make you sound less German.
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    http://de.wikiquote.org/wiki/Englisc...ichw%C3%B6rter
    But there are looots of proverbs...
    But actually I wouldn´t use them in an essay... they´re very seldom used in our normal life and nobody´d use them in an essay..
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    Hmm, I always thought 'vor die Hunde gehen' was only applicable to people - are you quite sure you're not confusing it with 'den Bach runtergehen'?:confused:

    Anyway, I agree with generalebriety: cramming your texts full of idioms and proverbial sayings will make your writing seem very odd. Idioms and proverbs need to be used sparingly in order to work, really.
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    (Original post by Shane-O)
    Hallo! Can you/anyone tell me more of these German proverbial phrases/idioms. i would love to put them into some German essays!!
    Hi, here are a few more:" Wer A sagt muss auch B sagen"
    literally: Who says A, has to say B, which means: if you start a task you have to finish it
    "Mit Ach und Krach" z.B.Er schaffte den Test mit Ach und Krach
    lit. He passed the test with ach( I don't know how to translate "ach" it's a sound you make when sighing)and bang

    one moreen Kopf in den Sand stecken- to put the head in the sand
    You say that to someone who closes his eyes to reality.
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    Thanks grizzly! That is exactly what I was after.

    It was never my intention to cram my essays full of these proverbial phrases, but if there is an opportunity to use one in an essay and it makes sense within the context, then I think it's worth doing.
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    Here we are...

    Besser spät als gar nicht- Better late than never
    Man kann nicht gleichtzeitig auf zwei Hochzeiten tanzen- You cannot have your cake and eat it
    Ende gut, alles gut.- All is wel that ends well
    Die tat wirkt mächtiger als das Wort-Actions speak louder than words
    Viel köche verderben den Brei- Too many cooks spoil the broth
    Alles auf eine Karte setzen- To put all ones eggs in one basket
    Die Katze lässt das Mausen nicht- The leopard never changes its spots
    Wo ein Wille ist, ist auch ein Weg- Where there is a will, there is a way
    Man soll das Fell des Bären nicht verkaufen, ehe man ihn erlegt hat- Dont count your chickens before theyve hatched
    Kein Unglück ist so groß, es hat sein Glück im Schoß- Every cloud has a silver lining
    Wer wagt, gewinnt- Nothing ventured, nothing gained
    Vorbeugen ist besser als heilen- Prevent is better than cure
    Wir haben alle unser Kreuz getragen- We all have our cross to bear
    Man ist im Leben nicht immer auf Rosen gebettet- life isnt always a bed of roses
    Wie man sich bettet, so liegt man- as you make your bed, so much you lie in it
    Gleich und gleich gesellt sich gern- birds of a feather, flock together
    Ehre, wem Ehre gebühr- Credit where credit is due
    Es ist nun einmal geschehen- what is done is done
    Man soll den Teufel nicht an die Wand malen- Dont tempt fate
    Wer im Glashaus sitzt, soll nicht mit Steinen werfen- People who live in glass ouses shouldnt throw stones

    Sorry for any errors in advanced.

    Wow, I wish I opened that link earlier, there are so many more plus mine. I feel a nipple, now.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Hmm, I always thought 'vor die Hunde gehen' was only applicable to people - are you quite sure you're not confusing it with 'den Bach runtergehen'?:confused:
    While being a native speaker, you actually made me think about these phrases for at least two minutes now. And I am still not absolutely sure about it. But I'd say you're right, the first expression is related to people that are loosing control of themselves e.g. while the second expression is clearly used on items etc. However, it is commonly used on things related to people like relationships or careers.

    But, if neccessary, please correct me, I am feeling increasingly dizzy when thinking about it
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    Hey...
    just wondering if anybody´s still awake?
    I´m doing my homework about Macbeth and I´m not sure about one phrase.
    The sentence is : "... which shows the big question-mark in his head, making him appear ambivalent and less authentic because of his incapable of making decisions by his own."
    Don´t know whats up with the "making him appear". Letting him appear?
    "erscheinen lassen" in German...
    Please answer!
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    Making him appear is perfectly fine.

    The last part however should be "because of his incapability of making decisions on his own"
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Making him appear is perfectly fine.

    The last part however should be "because of his incapability of making decisions on his own"
    Thanks!!
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Making him appear is perfectly fine.

    The last part however should be "because of his incapability of making decisions on his own"
    That sounds wrong to me, wouldn't it be "because of his incapability to make decisions on his own"? Using incapability sounds a bit iffy to me, I would say inability sounds more fitting, but maybe that's just me.
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    Why not just say "because he is incapable of making"?:p:
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    Yeah I read the word "incapability" about 20 times after I'd written it, and then I couldn't even decide if it was a real word.
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    (Original post by wtid)
    That sounds wrong to me, wouldn't it be "because of his incapability to make decisions on his own"? Using incapability sounds a bit iffy to me, I would say inability sounds more fitting, but maybe that's just me.
    What Fleece wrote sounds fine to me. Incapability / inability are (to my knowledge) pretty much interchangeable. Changing "of making" to "to make" doesn't sound wrong to me, but doesn't really sound right either.
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    I need help,
    I said: "do not wonder me not being able to sit still."
    What I meant to say was: "Wundere dich nicht darüber, dass ich nicht stillsitzen kann"
    'Do not wonder me' sounds awfully wrong, but I don't know how to say it.

    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    'Do not wonder me' sounds awfully wrong, but I don't know how to say it.

    Thanks in advance
    How about "don't be surprised"?
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    How about "don't be surprised"?
    and to complete the sentence 'don't be surprised that I cannot sit still' or 'that I'm not able to sit still'
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    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    and to complete the sentence 'don't be surprised that I cannot sit still' or 'that I'm not able to sit still'
    I'd use "can't". "Able to" sounds a bit awkward to me.
 
 
 
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