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    How come you know all this stuff about English grammar, Billy? Did you learn it of your own accord or did at school?
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Edit: ooh, I can think of at least one exception, actually. You always use "whether" when there's an implied "it doesn't matter (whether)...". So, for example, "whether you want to come along or not, I'm going to the cinema tomorrow". You'd never say "if" there. But you can say "it doesn't matter if you want to come along or not; I'm going to the cinema tomorrow".
    Think I didn´t get that....
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    "Whether" can always be replaced by "if", but "if" can't always be replaced by "whether". For that reason it's often better to make the distinction (and say "whether" when you mean "whether"), because "if" can be ambiguous or just sound plain wrong.

    Edit: ooh, I can think of at least one exception, actually. You always use "whether" when there's an implied "it doesn't matter (whether)...". So, for example, "whether you want to come along or not, I'm going to the cinema tomorrow". You'd never say "if" there. But you can say "it doesn't matter if you want to come along or not; I'm going to the cinema tomorrow".
    Hmm, wasn't there also some rule-of-thumb distinction along the lines of you use "whether" when there are exactly two alternatives and "if" when there are more than two?
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    Read this, it's helpful

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/le...rnitv179.shtml
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Read this, it's helpful

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/le...rnitv179.shtml
    Good old (or young compared to me) Fleece!
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    Thanks, very good link!
    That´s what I´ve guessed...but I learnt that you have to put in "whether" when you have two (if you have to? i would go for "when") opportunities e.g. "whether he likes apples or bananas"
    but what are "before to-infintives" ?
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Good old (or young compared to me) Fleece!
    Ey, how old are you?
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Ey, how old are you?
    Seit Deinstag bin ich vierundzwanzig
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    (Original post by gembarla)
    Thanks, very good link!
    That´s what I´ve guessed...but I learnt that you have to put in "whether" when you have two (if you have to? i would go for "when") opportunities e.g. "whether he likes apples or bananas"
    but what are "before to-infintives" ?
    Well that depends what the rest of the sentence is...

    i.e. "I don't know if he likes apples or bananas" works just as well as "I don't know whether he likes apples or bananas", but the second one, for me, implies more that you don't know which one he likes best, whereas in the first sentence you don't know if he likes either.

    to-infinitives are where you have the infinitive plus a 'to'.

    i.e. I don't know whether to buy a coat or not.
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Seit Deinstag bin ich vierundzwanzig
    Omg hah! Ok don't kill me but I sooooo thought you were at school doing your A-Levels. Now I've just read your profile sorry! Although you're not that much older than me, I'm going to age to 23 shortly
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    (Original post by Fleece)
    Omg hah! Ok don't kill me but I sooooo thought you were at school doing your A-Levels. Now I've just read your profile sorry! Although you're not that much older than me, I'm going to age to 23 shortly
    A-levels? Back in my day we did CSEs! (not really...). I forgive you, I mean I DO speak German like someone at A-level (albeit if I was only at this standard by A-level I think I'd be doing very badly..more like GCSE). Unfortunately for me I've done A-levels and even finished uni...in the real world now working 9-5 Mon-Fri same as the rest of the sheep :p:
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    (Original post by wtid)
    A-levels? Back in my day we did CSEs! (not really...). I forgive you, I mean I DO speak German like someone at A-level (albeit if I was only at this standard by A-level I think I'd be doing very badly..more like GCSE). Unfortunately for me I've done A-levels and even finished uni...in the real world now working 9-5 Mon-Fri same as the rest of the sheep :p:
    Haha, indeed. Again, many apologies. Dunno why I came to that conclusion really!



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    (Original post by Fleece)
    to-infinitives are where you have the infinitive plus a 'to'.

    i.e. I don't know whether to buy a coat or not.
    omg i am soo stupid i imagined in my mind something like "before-to infinitives" so as if before and to would belong together and create a special infinitive before to-infinitives, of course... :rolleyes:
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    Ich gehe morgen nach Deutschland Ich brauche zeit [off] die Arbeit, weil ich es nicht mag (that sounds wrong, can you not say that in German?).
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Ich fahre morgen nach Deutschland Ich brauche Zeit [off] die Arbeit, weil ich sie nicht mag (that sounds wrong, can you not say that in German?).
    Fahren, not gehen. You seem to do this all the time. "Gehen" is "to go (on foot)". Time is a noun, so Zeit. Also, "Arbeit" is feminine, so "it" is "sie", not "es". "Es" can only refer to neuter objects.

    Don't know how to say 'time off work'. Hmm. "Zeit weg von der Arbeit"?
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    (Original post by wtid)
    Ich gehe morgen nach Deutschland Ich brauche zeit [off] die Arbeit, weil ich es nicht mag (that sounds wrong, can you not say that in German?).
    Yes you can:
    "Ich brauche eine Auszeit von meinem Job, weil ich ihn nicht ausstehen kann". ("Job" is used slightly differently in German).

    "Auszeit" usually means "time-out" (as in football, etc.), by the way.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Fahren, not gehen. You seem to do this all the time. "Gehen" is "to go (on foot)". Time is a noun, so Zeit. Also, "Arbeit" is feminine, so "it" is "sie", not "es". "Es" can only refer to neuter objects.

    Don't know how to say 'time off work'. Hmm. "Zeit weg von der Arbeit"?
    God I'm stupid! You're right I always do it, damn my stupid memory :mad: Oh well that's going to be added to my bedroom wall. I guess it's my own fault for posting at work, meaning I have no time to read over it.

    I'm not sure I fully knew about "es". So "die Gabel", you'd say "sie ist eine Gabel"? and for "der Löffel" "er ist ein Löffel"?
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    (Original post by wtid)
    God I'm stupid! You're right I always do it, damn my stupid memory :mad: Oh well that's going to be added to my bedroom wall. I guess it's my own fault for posting at work, meaning I have no time to read over it.

    I'm not sure I fully knew about "es". So "die Gabel", you'd say "sie ist eine Gabel"? and for "der Löffel" "er ist ein Löffel"?
    I don't see why you'd need to. You'd probably just say "das (= this/that) ist eine Gabel / ein Löffel". But: "Was hast du mit dem Löffel / mit der Gabel gemacht?" - "Ich habe ihn / sie gewaschen". Or "Wo ist der Löffel / die Gabel?" - "Er / sie liegt auf dem Tisch".
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    It's no use I can't get my head around it. My brain isn't designed to learn languages. My girlfriend tried to explain it but I just don't get how it works, I'll just wait till I go tomorrow and she can try and explain in real life, maybe it's easier to learn that way.

    Cheers anyway tho
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    (Original post by wtid)
    It's no use I can't get my head around it. My brain isn't designed to learn languages. My girlfriend tried to explain it but I just don't get how it works, I'll just wait till I go tomorrow and she can try and explain in real life, maybe it's easier to learn that way.

    Cheers anyway tho
    Oi, giving up is the worst thing you can do. What don't you understand about it? It's simple - there are three choices for the word "it", depending on what gender "it" is. "I have a spoon. It is blue." = "Ich habe einen (masculine) Löffel. Er (masculine) ist blau."
 
 
 
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