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    Hey,

    So long story short, I had what could be called a mental episode last week in Uni. Essentially I burst into tears on my way to my placement school and had to turn back. Essentially incredibly stressed and overwhelmed by being on the opposite end of the country from my family, in a school that is less than ideal and underwhelmed by my University. Today I went to the Dr and essentially he gave me a letter saying I should come home. I'm essentially in 2 minds over this.

    1) I hate where I am at the moment and would love to come home. The plan would be to return to teaching next year in a Uni much closer to my family and friends which would take a tonne of pressure off.

    2) There's no guarantee that I would get accepted next year, especially if I bowed out to stress this year. Funding would also not be guaranteed for next year so that may also be an issue. I'd also have to try and find work to cover myself between now and next September.

    Any advice people could give would be gratefully accepted, at the moment my minds running in circles and I can't tell my arse from my elbow. Thank you very much
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    don't make any big decisions while you are upset. spend time at home with your family. maybe get help with your stress symptoms from the doctor.
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    Are you on a PGCE? Why not email the unis closer to home and see if you can transfer there? Don't ask don't get and all...?
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    1. Talk to student support/ welfare about your homesickness/ anxiety.
    2. Talk to your tutor about the significance of taking a break from studies and your current situation.
    3. Do as moanymoo suggested and start contacting unis you are interested in to see if they are ok with applications from someone in your situation.
    4. Check the impact on financing.


    When you know the answers to these questions, then you will be in a better position to decide things. Rather than go ome immediately you do need to speak to someone on the course to make sure its an oderly exit and to make sure there is a way back.

    Can I just add, that I have sympathy for how unhappy you might feel , but before acting on impulse and running away to regroup you need to be aware of the impact on your course/career and that it is recoverable. I am not saying dont go home, but try and tidy things up where you are. You mught find it harder to get back onto a course and you need to know how it all works so you can make the best decision for you. To that extent I would just hang on and work hard to get more information.

    If you then have to go that's your choice, but it will be in an informed way of what lies ahead.
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    I'd make the observation on your point 2 that there is bound to be at least a question in the minds of Admissions' Tutors about any subsequent application for the same course as to your suitability, given that the reason you dropped out of your current course was for stress brought on by the workload. If you believe it wasn't so much the workload, but the fact that the school/university is poor and you missed home and, but for these factors, you would have coped with the stress/workload of the course, then that's ok, but it's something you would need to tackle head on with any subsequent university application. You might, also, need to be really honest with yourself about this, too.
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    (Original post by StudentTeach1982)
    Hey,

    So long story short, I had what could be called a mental episode last week in Uni. Essentially I burst into tears on my way to my placement school and had to turn back. Essentially incredibly stressed and overwhelmed by being on the opposite end of the country from my family, in a school that is less than ideal and underwhelmed by my University. Today I went to the Dr and essentially he gave me a letter saying I should come home. I'm essentially in 2 minds over this.

    1) I hate where I am at the moment and would love to come home. The plan would be to return to teaching next year in a Uni much closer to my family and friends which would take a tonne of pressure off.

    2) There's no guarantee that I would get accepted next year, especially if I bowed out to stress this year. Funding would also not be guaranteed for next year so that may also be an issue. I'd also have to try and find work to cover myself between now and next September.

    Any advice people could give would be gratefully accepted, at the moment my minds running in circles and I can't tell my arse from my elbow. Thank you very much
    There is some good advice in the answers you have already received.

    I did PGCE after going to university to PhD level and then working in industry for nearly 20 years. PGCE is without doubt the most difficult course I have ever done in my life. I lost count of the number of times I wanted to give in. However, I did n't. Now, 5 years on, I am so pleased about that as I love what I do.

    Try to accept that it's very hard work and just realise that you only have to get through about another 6-7 months. Also, there are loads of teachers who visit a doctor for stress so don't feel bad about that. If you can stick with it then really do try to do so.
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    Not sure if this is helpful, but I did an MRes full time 2011-2012. I got a scholarship but fee-waiver only, so I worked through it. I was MISERABLE. The course was a complete mess, and I was working a 'proper' graduate job four days a week, so I was exhausted. I wanted to quit every single day but couldn't walk away from a scholarship so kept on going. In the end I only got a pass (as did everyone else as it happens), and I think that the course has since been discontinued as it was just so so poorly put together.

    Despite all that, at the end of the day I do have a masters-level qualification, and the year did pass. I think I would have really regretted it if I dropped out. I have a friend on the other hand who took medical leave from his PhD, and has found it too difficult to return to. He will probably never go back, even though the place is waiting for him.

    Hence why I think transferring would be an option - if you get off the path, it's much harder to find your way back onto it. But if it's the wrong one anyway (teaching) then quitting while you've got minimal student loan debts and opportunity to find the right way forward is better than realising partway through your NQT year how miserable you are.
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    My personal opinion would be that dropping out is not the best decision, as you've said you risk not getting accepted to another course and you also don't give yourself the chance to learn to stand on your own feet. What happens if you can't get a job near your parents straight away?

    This is such a short period of your life and while I'm sure it feels horrible I think it would be far better to learn how to push through.
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    Cheers for the reply folksI have looked into into transferring but the Universities I've selected have said no. Essentially I'd have to start againI already have a masters so was prepared for a heavy workload but the PGCE is insane. There's no real communication between my placement and my Uni, so frequently I have a weeks notice to do an essay of 4000 words and plan lessons for the week. The main reason for the stress is the fact that my folks health has taken a knock this year and they're not getting any younger. I'd never forgive myself if something happened to them and I'm 6 hours drive away.Again, thanks for the advice folks. All opinions gratefully received
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    Think long term but also, there's a lot to be said for allowing yourself to make decisions that will make you happy.

    Getting onto another pgce is always a worry but some subjects have a massive shortage.

    If possible, have a week off with the drs note and use that break to come to the best decision you can. Be rational. Only you know how you feel.
 
 
 
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