username2585877
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I’ve got the main 5 points of my essay, but I’m unsure on how to go about the introduction. The essay title is:

Golding’s Lord of the Flies is a commentary on civilisation and civilised behaviour. Discuss.
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Connor27
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(Original post by frankielogue)
I’ve got the main 5 points of my essay, but I’m unsure on how to go about the introduction. The essay title is:

Golding’s Lord of the Flies is a commentary on civilisation and civilised behaviour. Discuss.
Ooh I did LoTF for my lit GCSE aswell, I do A Level Lit at the moment.

For the introduction I'd make the general point that the entire book is an allegory for civilisation. The younger children represent the masses that are uneducated, their names are unimportant and they follow whoever is popular at the time (first ralph and then Jack.)

Jack represents fascism, and could be a caricature of Benito Mussolini (black uniforms, incredibly violent and sociopathic, attempts populism when Ralph's approach becomes unpopular)

Piggy represents the intelligentsia he is clearly more intelligent than the rest and is a bit elitist, as he insults those that are less intelligent than him. Also he is generally disliked as the intelligentsia are in modern society. Interestingly Golding gives Piggy a working class background while the rest of the boys are middle class, this is a neat reversal of real society where the elite are middle class and the masses are workers

Ralph represents liberalism and democracy, as he uses the conch to give everyone a voice and initially becomes chief by an vote, unlike Jack who feels he is entitle to lead. He also attempts to create a consensus between piggy's intellectualism and Jack's populism.
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CoffeeAndPolitics
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Try asking in this forum http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...2#post67043152 , someone might reply. I can't help sadly as I don't do Lord of the Flies :P .
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(Original post by Connor27)
Ooh I did LoTF for my lit GCSE aswell, I do A Level Lit at the moment.

For the introduction I'd make the general point that the entire book is an allegory for civilisation. The younger children represent the masses that are uneducated, their names are unimportant and they follow whoever is popular at the time (first ralph and then Jack.)

Jack represents fascism, and could be a caricature of Benito Mussolini (black uniforms, incredibly violent and sociopathic, attempts populism when Ralph's approach becomes unpopular)

Piggy represents the intelligentsia he is clearly more intelligent than the rest and is a bit elitist, as he insults those that are less intelligent than him. Also he is generally disliked as the intelligentsia are in modern society. Interestingly Golding gives Piggy a working class background while the rest of the boys are middle class, this is a neat reversal of real society where the elite are middle class and the masses are workers

Ralph represents liberalism and democracy, as he uses the conch to give everyone a voice and initially becomes chief by an vote, unlike Jack who feels he is entitle to lead. He also attempts to create a consensus between piggy's intellectualism and Jack's populism.
Oh my loooord thanks so much!! I could not think of a better introduction!
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Connor27
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(Original post by frankielogue)
Oh my loooord thanks so much!! I could not think of a better introduction!
No problem! I also forgot about Simon though :/

Simon represents religion, a cornerstone of society in the 50s (when the book was written and set), He is initially part of Jack's Choir as religion is considered a right wing ideology, but eventually Jack turns on Simon because he is a threat to Jack's absolute power; just as Adolf Hitler censored the church and attempted to replace the bible with Mein Kampf, because religion was an alternative to fascism, this culminates with Jack leading the children into murdering Simon and presenting him as the "beast" another scapegoat to direct anger away from his incompetent leadership, this scene is evocative of the death of Jesus, as Simon is dying for the sins of the masses, his death sparks Ralph and Piggy to go against jack, when they were just about to join the feast and submit to him
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(Original post by Connor27)
No problem! I also forgot about Simon though :/

Simon represents religion, a cornerstone of society in the 50s (when the book was written and set), He is initially part of Jack's Choir as religion is considered a right wing ideology, but eventually Jack turns on Simon because he is a threat to Jack's absolute power; just as Adolf Hitler censored the church and attempted to replace the bible with Mein Kampf, because religion was an alternative to fascism, this culminates with Jack leading the children into murdering Simon and presenting him as the "beast" another scapegoat to direct anger away from his incompetent leadership, this scene is evocative of the death of Jesus, as Simon is dying for the sins of the masses, his death sparks Ralph and Piggy to go against jack, when they were just about to join the feast and submit to him
I saw this in an examiners report from last year but you elaborated way better! Thanks soo much. Do you know where I might find any quotes to back up Piggy’s sense of superiority?

EDIT: It’s fine, I got some! Huge thanks though!
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(Original post by frankielogue)
I saw this in an examiners report from last year but you elaborated way better! Thanks soo much. Do you know where I might find any quotes to back up Piggy’s sense of superiority?
"Like Kids! Acting like a crowd of kids!"

"It's them that haven't no common sense that make trouble on this island"

Those two come to mind but I don't have a copy of the book handy I'm afraid
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(Original post by Connor27)
"Like Kids! Acting like a crowd of kids!"

"It's them that haven't no common sense that make trouble on this island"

Those two come to mind but I don't have a copy of the book handy I'm afraid
Thanks!
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