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Anyone know what Investment Bankers do? watch

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    Anyone know what Investment Bankers do?
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    (Original post by RyanW)
    Anyone know what Investment Bankers do?
    work
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    (Original post by ThornsnRoses)
    work
    ....Oh and your funny.

    ****in loser.
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    9am - 12pm
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    (Original post by jumpunderaboat)
    9am - 12pm
    Quite.

    At least one day of the weekend is often included, frequently both.

    I've been told real stories about how corporate lawyers in the City (who work similarly antisocial hours) would send mailroom staff to Harvey Nichols (for new shirts) during a hectic merger.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Quite.

    At least one day of the weekend is often included, frequently both.

    I've been told real stories about how corporate lawyers in the City (who work similarly antisocial hours) would send mailroom staff to Harvey Nichols (for new shirts) during a hectic merger.
    Lol, sadly enough I'm trying to keep both the IB and corporate law careers as a possibility. Wanna start my own business eventually though, thats where the money and leisure is.
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    (Original post by jumpunderaboat)
    Lol, sadly enough I'm trying to keep both the IB and corporate law careers as a possibility. Wanna start my own business eventually though, thats where the money and leisure is.
    That's more or less what a close family member of mine did, following quite a nice route to success:

    Law Degree (LSE)>>International Corporate Lawyer>>MBA>>Own business

    Although being a Corporate Lawyer is stressful - done properly and given the right opportunities - it can mean that you want for nothing, and never need to work (for a living) again.

    I would gladly toil away for 15 years in the City, if it meant that by age 40, I could do more or less whatever I wanted to, on my terms, and not reliant on anybody for anything.

    I couldn't think of anything more stale than starting my career in a High St. Law firm.
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    As I'm going to be doing economics as my degree, would corporate law still be possible though?...with the right conversion courses etc

    Got a kinda funny story involving the MBA. My cousin did his and meanwhile worked in the local Budgens...the had no idea what course he was doing and yet promoted him to assitant manager then manager then regional manager. With those references got his current job which he earns about £50k from, he didn't even tell them about his degree or MBA...
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    My boyf is an i.banker and believe me, the working hours thing is not a joke. It's all true! These are my observations from the outside:

    1) Lots of work. Analysts (BA/BSC) and associates (MA/MSC/MBA) get to do most of the legwork. It's not unusual that a managing director or someone else high up will give you a piece of work to do last thing on Friday for first thing Monday. Adios weekend.

    2) Good pay, but the hourly rate probably isn't so great. C.f. above. Also not great job security. Great for the CV though. Gets you places.

    3) Interesting work (if you are into the maths/finance thing). However, beyond the introductory mini MBA type training, very little training and development support.

    4) Very political. You have to be very good at playing the game. Working hard is not enough.

    5) Personally I found some of my boyf's co-workers a bit, erm, well, sexist really. I've been to a few dinners, and when they found out that a blonde, ahem, shapely young lady had a successful career and was an Oxonian to boot, they really couldn't hide their surprise. I was stunned at this, I really was. I think that the new blood coming up through the firms doesn't share this attitude, but some of the older people appear to have hung on to their prejudices.

    CAVEAT to all of the above - this is just my experience, I'm not saying it is universally true. I've not worked in investment banking myself, but I do know three or four who do.

    What I would say is that often management consultancy is a better bet if you want flexibility later on. You will get staffed on a number of assignments across different markets/businesses, which might stand you in good stead later. However, a lot of the cons from above still apply.

    Try looking at vault.com for inside info on firms.

    HTH
    Lizzylou
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    (Original post by lizzylou)
    My boyf is an i.banker and believe me, the working hours thing is not a joke. It's all true! These are my observations from the outside:

    1) Lots of work. Analysts (BA/BSC) and associates (MA/MSC/MBA) get to do most of the legwork. It's not unusual that a managing director or someone else high up will give you a piece of work to do last thing on Friday for first thing Monday. Adios weekend.

    2) Good pay, but the hourly rate probably isn't so great. C.f. above. Also not great job security. Great for the CV though. Gets you places.

    3) Interesting work (if you are into the maths/finance thing). However, beyond the introductory mini MBA type training, very little training and development support.

    4) Very political. You have to be very good at playing the game. Working hard is not enough.

    5) Personally I found some of my boyf's co-workers a bit, erm, well, sexist really. I've been to a few dinners, and when they found out that a blonde, ahem, shapely young lady had a successful career and was an Oxonian to boot, they really couldn't hide their surprise. I was stunned at this, I really was. I think that the new blood coming up through the firms doesn't share this attitude, but some of the older people appear to have hung on to their prejudices.

    CAVEAT to all of the above - this is just my experience, I'm not saying it is universally true. I've not worked in investment banking myself, but I do know three or four who do.

    What I would say is that often management consultancy is a better bet if you want flexibility later on. You will get staffed on a number of assignments across different markets/businesses, which might stand you in good stead later. However, a lot of the cons from above still apply.

    Try looking at vault.com for inside info on firms.

    HTH
    Lizzylou
    So your partner is a banker, and I presume you're a student? Thats very rare, so how do you see each other seeing as he's so busy.
 
 
 
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