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Syrian refugees in Germany find country's mosques too conservative watch

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    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-a7384146.html

    Over two months, a dozen Syrians in six places of worship in three cities told Reuters they were uncomfortable with very conservative messages in Arabic-speaking mosques. People have criticised the way the newcomers dress and practise their religion, they said. Some insisted the Koran be interpreted word-for-word.
    “One time when I was there, a Salafist asked a young Arab man to leave because he was wearing shorts,” he added. “At the Turkish mosque no one cares what you're wearing.”

    In a windowless ground floor room inside the Arabic mosque one Friday in August, some 200 men, including about two dozen with bushy beards and trimmed moustaches typical of ultra-Orthodox Muslims, crowded for prayers.
    A 2008 survey of Muslims and Christians in Europe by the state-funded WZB Berlin Social Science Centre found fundamentalist attitudes were less prevalent among German Muslims than elsewhere in Europe, but still quite widespread: For example, nearly half the Muslims it surveyed in Germany felt religious law to be more important than secular law.
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    You know there's a problem with a mosque when even refugees from ultra conservative Middle Eastern nations think it's too extreme.
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    Good, hopefully they will start to change slowly and become more conservative too; it's hardly surprising that they are so slack when the Assads have been slowly destroying their faith for decades.
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    If they don't like it they can go back home then.
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    (Original post by Zamestaneh)
    Good, hopefully they will start to change slowly and become more conservative too; it's hardly surprising that they are so slack when the Assads have been slowly destroying their faith for decades.
    No its the mosques that need to change not the people who clearly realise there is more to life than religion.
    In fact any mosque in which a muslim from a muslim country thinks is too strict should be closed with all staff members detained indefinitely until an investigation for links to terrorism can be completed.
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    (Original post by AlexS101)
    No its the mosques that need to change not the people who clearly realise there is more to life than religion.
    In fact any mosque in which a muslim from a muslim country thinks is too strict should be closed with all staff members detained indefinitely and investigated for links to terrorism.
    The whole point of religion is that it defines the purpose of your life; it's like saying clearly there is more to going to Hospital than getting better from illness, like you can get your MOT done for your car, or auction berries picked from your garden - it's nonesensical.

    And then the second half of your post indicates you are either trolling or severely lacking upstairs.
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    (Original post by Zamestaneh)
    The whole point of religion is that it defines the purpose of your life; it's like saying clearly there is more to going to Hospital than getting better from illness, like you can get your MOT done for your car, or auction berries picked from your garden - it's nonesensical.

    And then the second half of your post indicates you are either trolling or severely lacking upstairs.
    As an Atheist I prefer to see religion as a way dictators used to try and control others before there was proper governance.
    Any decent hospital does go further than getting people better from their illness, and also deals with arranging support to reduce the risk of reoccurrences, and in many hospitals there are people who specialise in helping relatives of the bereaved and terminally ill who themselves are not unwell.
    The second half was initially badly written but I'm afraid I stand by it, as these refugees are likely to have a better understanding of Islam than local security services, and their actions are suggesting that these mosques are not preaching a moderate view, and are likely to be harbouring at least some with extreme views that could be a danger to locals.
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    (Original post by AlexS101)
    As an Atheist I prefer to see religion as a way dictators used to try and control others before there was proper governance.
    Any decent hospital does go further than getting people better from their illness, and also deals with arranging support to reduce the risk of reoccurrences, and in many hospitals there are people who specialise in helping relatives of the bereaved and terminally ill who themselves are not unwell.
    The second half was initially badly written but I'm afraid I stand by it, as these refugees are likely to have a better understanding of Islam than local security services, and their actions are suggesting that these mosques are not preaching a moderate view, and are likely to be harbouring at least some with extreme views that could be a danger to locals.
    As a former agnost, I used to agree with that view, and indeed we can look at times in history when say the Catholic church or various rulers of figures wielded religious power to benefit themselves; but it's actually a theory with little substance with regard to the founders of the religions themselves - no one can convincingly prove the intentions of the founders to be using religion as a tool of control, as if they did not genuinely believe in their own faith that they were propogating, and that they were insincere.

    Tbh 'liberal' Muslims have as corrupt an understanding of religion as ISIS, but they are just on the opposite side of the spectrum, so their opinion is not worth any weight; the only reason you might not care about this difference is because liberal Muslims aren't executing civilians for no reason. The Syrians complaining are too liberal because they have lived under a secular dictatorship for decades, so again their complaints mean nothing.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    If they don't like it they can go back home then.
    You are so incredible daft aren't you?

    They are literally saying what you want to hear. But you just hear "oh something they don't like, good they can go back".
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    (Original post by Zamestaneh)
    Good, hopefully they will start to change slowly and become more conservative too; it's hardly surprising that they are so slack when the Assads have been slowly destroying their faith for decades.
    What you would say to the Fatimids, I'd love to know...
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    You are so incredible daft aren't you?

    They are literally saying what you want to hear. But you just hear "oh something they don't like, good they can go back".
    He's so ignorant lol
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    If this is true then this is brilliant news, sounds like we need more Syrians
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    'Everything about this mosque made me feel uneasy', says migrant Hani Salam after being ordered to grow a beard
    lmao Islam is lit
 
 
 
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