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    Unfortunately i only considered taking CS after i had already chosen my A-levels, none of which included maths. Now i do understand that maths is a fundamental part of CS but i have 2 questions:

    1: Is a computer science course possible without maths at A-level or will it be too hard?

    2: Are there any good universities who do not require maths at A-level to apply for CS? (I only know of Newcastle so far who only require a B in maths at GCSE)

    Any help would be appreciated
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    (Original post by Matthew.Trimble)
    Unfortunately i only considered taking CS after i had already chosen my A-levels, none of which included maths. Now i do understand that maths is a fundamental part of CS but i have 2 questions:

    1: Is a computer science course possible without maths at A-level or will it be too hard?

    2: Are there any good universities who do not require maths at A-level to apply for CS? (I only know of Newcastle so far who only require a B in maths at GCSE)

    Any help would be appreciated
    My best mate also wants to do computer science and doesn't do maths either. Check out Brunel uni london, Queen Mary's, reading and brighton. Those are the ones he's applying too :-)
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    (Original post by Matthew.Trimble)
    Unfortunately i only considered taking CS after i had already chosen my A-levels, none of which included maths. Now i do understand that maths is a fundamental part of CS but i have 2 questions:

    1: Is a computer science course possible without maths at A-level or will it be too hard?

    2: Are there any good universities who do not require maths at A-level to apply for CS? (I only know of Newcastle so far who only require a B in maths at GCSE)

    Any help would be appreciated
    1. No, it would start from scratch and there should be extra help sessions for people who aren't comfortable with maths.

    2. Check these out:

    Grouping 1: KCL, Leeds, Nottingham, Newcastle, Lancaster, Swansea, Loughborough, Cardiff, RHUL, Exeter, Liverpool, QMUL, UEA, QUB, Dundee, Surrey

    Grouping 2: Brunel, City, Strathclyde, Sussex, Essex, Leicester, Aston, Kent, Heriot Watt, Aberystwyth, Hull

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    So there's a story about a Physicist who made amazing discoveries because he could solve problems using pictures. I forgot his name, but he is down in history as one of the greats and had no formal mathematical training.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    1. No, it would start from scratch and there should be extra help sessions for people who aren't comfortable with maths.

    2. Check these out:

    Grouping 1: KCL, Leeds, Nottingham, Newcastle, Lancaster, Swansea, Loughborough, Cardiff, RHUL, Exeter, Liverpool, QMUL, UEA, QUB, Dundee, Surrey

    Grouping 2: Brunel, City, Strathclyde, Sussex, Essex, Leicester, Aston, Kent, Heriot Watt, Aberystwyth, Hull

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    What made you separate these universities into different groups?
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    (Original post by Tom__)
    What made you separate these universities into different groups?
    Research strength, course, ranking
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Research strength, course, ranking
    Would group 1 be considerably harder to receive an offer from?

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by Goel)
    Would group 1 be considerably harder to receive an offer from?

    Thank you.
    Nah
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Nah
    I'm in a (sort of) similar situation to OP. I'm only doing one A level which is A level Maths alongside a BTEC extended diploma in IT. I'm worried that top universities like Nottingham, Sheffield, Leeds will decline my offer cause of my AS level results (I got a C in Maths and D*D in the BTEC). My predicted grade is B in Maths.. this is definitely achievable but I'm worried about whether any of those 3 universities will even give me an offer
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    (Original post by Tom__)
    I'm in a (sort of) similar situation to OP. I'm only doing one A level which is A level Maths alongside a BTEC extended diploma in IT. I'm worried that top universities like Nottingham, Sheffield, Leeds will decline my offer cause of my AS level results (I got a C in Maths and D*D in the BTEC). My predicted grade is B in Maths.. this is definitely achievable but I'm worried about whether any of those 3 universities will even give me an offer
    Oh, you can apply to places above grouping one with that prediction combo afaia - like York which is AAB.

    And nah most unis don't actually care as much as you'd think tbh.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    1. No, it would start from scratch and there should be extra help sessions for people who aren't comfortable with maths.

    2. Check these out:

    Grouping 1: KCL, Leeds, Nottingham, Newcastle, Lancaster, Swansea, Loughborough, Cardiff, RHUL, Exeter, Liverpool, QMUL, UEA, QUB, Dundee, Surrey

    Grouping 2: Brunel, City, Strathclyde, Sussex, Essex, Leicester, Aston, Kent, Heriot Watt, Aberystwyth, Hull

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    Thank you, i'll check all of those out, some i never even considered before. Luckily i think i have till Christmas to choose my options
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    (Original post by Matthew.Trimble)

    1: Is a computer science course possible without maths at A-level or will it be too hard?

    2: Are there any good universities who do not require maths at A-level to apply for CS? (I only know of Newcastle so far who only require a B in maths at GCSE)

    Any help would be appreciated
    I can answer both of your questions to a degree. I'm a first year undergraduate student at Newcastle University, I started just this September. Just to give you an idea, I studied English, History, Philosophy and Biology for my A Levels and ended up with ABB overall, and I got a B in maths at GCSE. I had 0 prior knowledge of programming/comp. sci. concepts.

    We're studying 4 modules right now: Computer Architecture, 'Software Engineering Professional' (essentially study skills + group-work), Programming (in Java), and Maths for Comp. Sci, with the majority of lectures and practicals/tutorials in the latter two subjects.

    The maths isn't so bad. Many of the concepts which come up I did at GCSE. Things like: simultaneous equations, LCM and HCF, algebraic fractions and vectors. Things I hadn't done at GCSE includes stuff like: binaries/octals/hexademicals, logarithms, set expressions, recursion, derivatives etc. If you study hard, write good notes and pay attention in lectures, you should be fine. We frequently have tutorials too in which you're given a worksheet based on content from lectures in which demonstrators who know their stuff will help you if you need it.

    I'm having a great time so far, but I'm definitely having to put in the effort to keep up. Most of my course friends did some combination of maths, physics or computer science at A Level so it comes a lot more naturally to them, don't let that put you off though. I'm finding the maths to be easier than the programming personally, I find programming makes sense in lectures but applying the knowledge to actually create a program can be pretty challenging, especially as Java isn't considered an entry-level language like perhaps Python or Ruby, rather being more of a mid-difficulty language.

    My other prospective unis were: Swansea, Kent, Hull and Keele/Bangor, Newcastle being my first choice.
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    Anyone know how good Reading is for comp sci?

    Also, I'm glad to find more people who haven't done A-Level Maths but are doing well now.
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    (Original post by Casri)
    I can answer both of your questions to a degree. I'm a first year undergraduate student at Newcastle University, I started just this September. Just to give you an idea, I studied English, History, Philosophy and Biology for my A Levels and ended up with ABB overall, and I got a B in maths at GCSE. I had 0 prior knowledge of programming/comp. sci. concepts.

    We're studying 4 modules right now: Computer Architecture, 'Software Engineering Professional' (essentially study skills + group-work), Programming (in Java), and Maths for Comp. Sci, with the majority of lectures and practicals/tutorials in the latter two subjects.

    The maths isn't so bad. Many of the concepts which come up I did at GCSE. Things like: simultaneous equations, LCM and HCF, algebraic fractions and vectors. Things I hadn't done at GCSE includes stuff like: binaries/octals/hexademicals, logarithms, set expressions, recursion, derivatives etc. If you study hard, write good notes and pay attention in lectures, you should be fine. We frequently have tutorials too in which you're given a worksheet based on content from lectures in which demonstrators who know their stuff will help you if you need it.

    I'm having a great time so far, but I'm definitely having to put in the effort to keep up. Most of my course friends did some combination of maths, physics or computer science at A Level so it comes a lot more naturally to them, don't let that put you off though. I'm finding the maths to be easier than the programming personally, I find programming makes sense in lectures but applying the knowledge to actually create a program can be pretty challenging, especially as Java isn't considered an entry-level language like perhaps Python or Ruby, rather being more of a mid-difficulty language.

    My other prospective unis were: Swansea, Kent, Hull and Keele/Bangor, Newcastle being my first choice.
    I'm in the same year as you, similar background, really enjoying Newcastle so far!

    I would disagree on one point though, although I've had no programming / maths experience, programming is certainly easier (for me) than the maths. I haven't had much time to revise or go over things but If I did put in an hour a night for the maths I can definitely say that it would be a lot easier.

    But yes, I have a friend who had studied Maths, F Maths, Physics and Chemistry. The math module comes very easy to him and hes doing very well despite walking out of most math lectures. With Newcastle though, there is enough help if you need it so you're never alone.
 
 
 
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